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Big Tex Storage The Heights: 7-Story Storage At 730 E. 11th


tmariar

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Does anyone know if the Resurrection Life Fellowship building at 730 E. 11th - not too far west of the instersection of 11th and Studewood - was once a movie theater? And, if so, what it was called?

I'll post this in the Heights subforum for now, but if a moderator wants to move it to Historic Houston, that's fine by me.

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Edited by tmariar
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According to Cinema Houston, it was the Stude Theater (625 seats built and run by Robert Z. Glass - Glass Theatre Corporation).

The grand opening was on November 16, 1939, featuring East Side of Heaven.

It has been a church since 1956, apparently.

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Thanks, Sev! The website just has this info:

"The year 1939 is generally considered to be Hollywood's true golden year. Four new theatres opened that year, all during the month of November, making the pre-Christmas season a busy one for moviegoers. Interstate's Alabama Theatre, was the first and largest out of the gate, and the only one that was not an independently owned house. This was followed by the Stude Theatre in the Heights, the Navaway, and the River Oaks Theatre."

"When it opened in 1939, the Alabama was Interstate's tenth theatre in the Houston area, the others being the Metropolitan, Majestic, Kirby, Delman, Eastwood, North Main, Tower, Bluebonnet, and the Yale. In addition, it was the first and largest of four November openings, with the independent Stude, Navaway, and River Oaks theatres following."

But I was also able to find this short piece from Boxoffice magazine, July 10, 1948:

"R.Z. Glass is now sole owner of the Stude Theatre. Glass, who has always owned half of the Stude, recently completed arrangements for the purchase of the other half from the Interstate circuit. He also owns the State, another suburban theatre in Houston. No changes in personnel are planned at the present. D.L. Murray will remain as general manager of both theatres, with F.A. Ross as treasurer. A parking lot next to the Stude accommodates 800 cars and further improvements are planned, including the installation of new seats. There will be no changes in policy or admission price. Before he built the Stude in 1939, Glass owned and operated three neighborhood houses in Dallas. He built the State in 1941. Prominent in aviation, Glass has been a pilot for 17 years. He does all his traveling by his own plane which he flies himself. He has won second and third places in two air races, the first in Miami in 1936 and the other in St. Louis in 1937."

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i would love to see it operate as theater again, but i know that is a pipe dream.

on a side note, i live a couple blocks away and never see "services" in action at that church... hate to admit it, but i'd rather see it be almost anything but a church. there are plenty of those in the heights...

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i would love to see it operate as theater again, but i know that is a pipe dream.

on a side note, i live a couple blocks away and never see "services" in action at that church... hate to admit it, but i'd rather see it be almost anything but a church. there are plenty of those in the heights...

I enjoy the artistic contribution the churches make to the neighborhood, but I'm with you on this one. This building needs to become something else.

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I enjoy the artistic contribution the churches make to the neighborhood, but I'm with you on this one. This building needs to become something else.

in some cases, yes. they are very pretty and i think churches add to a sense of community (even though i never step foot in them)

i guess i am just bitter b/c when DH and i bought our house, we saw a sign that said "the vinyard" and were all excited about the possibility that there was a wine bar so close to our house... :blush:

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  • Highrise Tower changed the title to Big Tex Storage The Heights: 7-Story Storage at 730 E. 11th St.

This building looks like it was originally a movie theater, which would account for the marquee and distinctive 'stepped' shape of the building to accommodate a sloped floor and and seating. 
Any idea as to what it was originally called? 
https://www.google.com/maps/place/730+E+11th+St,+Houston,+TX+77008/@29.7908659,-95.3884872,3a,75y,228.93h,82.27t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s9rMIBPkBGPRsy8Ci6eapGw!2e0!7i16384!8i8192!4m5!3m4!1s0x8640b8a3e13d48ad:0x3d7f7d15a95b7876!8m2!3d29.7905505!4d-95.3886791?hl=en

 

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13 minutes ago, dbigtex56 said:

This building looks like it was originally a movie theater, which would account for the marquee and distinctive 'stepped' shape of the building to accommodate a sloped floor and and seating. 
Any idea as to what it was originally called? 
https://www.google.com/maps/place/730+E+11th+St,+Houston,+TX+77008/@29.7908659,-95.3884872,3a,75y,228.93h,82.27t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s9rMIBPkBGPRsy8Ci6eapGw!2e0!7i16384!8i8192!4m5!3m4!1s0x8640b8a3e13d48ad:0x3d7f7d15a95b7876!8m2!3d29.7905505!4d-95.3886791?hl=en

 

Stude Theater. Scroll up to the top of the thread.

 

From the 1942 City Directory

image.thumb.png.1c5e65f55e8e56b1e01d2ec3e8ad42b9.png

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On 12/9/2008 at 11:32 AM, heights_yankee said:

. . . hate to admit it, but i'd rather see it be almost anything but a church . . .

 

On 12/10/2008 at 9:08 AM, tanith27 said:

. . . this building needs to become something else . . .


That's a "be caureful what you wish for" 12 years in the making. For a self storage of all places . . .

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Wow, just wow. I was just in Memphis and that city knows how to save its history. I'm embarrassed. And this is all the wiggle room that is needed for those other historic buildings on 11th to see the same fate. Literally makes me sick to my stomach. When is this city going to do something about its Preservation Ordinance? 

Edited by j_cuevas713
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11 minutes ago, j_cuevas713 said:

Wow, just wow. I was just in Memphis and that city knows how to save its history. I'm embarrassed. And this is all the wiggle room that is needed for those other historic buildings on 11th to see the same fate. Literally makes me sick to my stomach. When is this city going to do something about its Preservation Ordinance? 

Well, it's currently being sued for trying to enforce what little ordinance it has . . . so we'll have to wait for that to pan out first 😁

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Quote

Wow, just wow. I was just in Memphis and that city knows how to save its history. I'm embarrassed. And this is all the wiggle room that is needed for those other historic buildings on 11th to see the same fate. Literally makes me sick to my stomach. When is this city going to do something about its Preservation Ordinance? 

 

I'm sorry but there is nothing remarkable or worth preserving about an old movie theater that has been converted into a church.  Now, I will certainly admit that a 7 story self storage building on 11th street in the heights is a rather bold "only in Houston" maneuver.... at least the property will now contribute to the local tax base.  I am curious how they will manage with the new permitting requirements for stormwater detention.

 

Quote

Well, it's currently being sued for trying to enforce what little ordinance it has . . . so we'll have to wait for that to pan out first 😁

Oh really? Any more details?

 

https://theleadernews.com/leader-listings-real-estate/citys-preservation-ordinance-faces-legal-challenge/

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19 minutes ago, tangledwoods said:

 

I'm sorry but there is nothing remarkable or worth preserving about an old movie theater that has been converted into a church.  Now, I will certainly admit that a 7 story self storage building on 11th street in the heights is a rather bold "only in Houston" maneuver.... at least the property will now contribute to the local tax base.  I am curious how they will manage with the new permitting requirements for stormwater detention.

 

 

https://theleadernews.com/leader-listings-real-estate/citys-preservation-ordinance-faces-legal-challenge/

I'm so done. Anyone have an opinion on the possible outlook of this?

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1 hour ago, tangledwoods said:

 

I'm sorry but there is nothing remarkable or worth preserving about an old movie theater that has been converted into a church.  Now, I will certainly admit that a 7 story self storage building on 11th street in the heights is a rather bold "only in Houston" maneuver.... at least the property will now contribute to the local tax base.  I am curious how they will manage with the new permitting requirements for stormwater detention.

With all due respect, it's attitudes like this which end up completely erasing historic neighborhoods in cities like Houston. There's so much of the city that's been bulldozed for no reason other than "it's not remarkable," replaced with something that absolutely contributes less to the community than whatever was there before. We'd be so much better off if we had kept more 1936 movie theaters instead of paving another parking lot. This individual building might not be remarkable anymore (though I disagree), it used to be part of an entire community of similar structures, and only now that it's all that's left from the period it looks out of place.

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That's probably not great for Bellagreen - they currently have some sort of arrangement with the church that allows diners to use the church's parking lot during times when the church isn't holding services (Bellagreen's own parking area is tiny). I can't imagine that will continue once a self-storage facility goes up.  

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  • 1 month later...

This is why forcing everything into going up and off of the relevant neighborhood message board is a major mistake by HAIF.  This demo and development pretty much blindsided everyone in the Heights.  

This is truly the worst project in the Heights since Walmart.  It is almost as if this developer is doing this just to piss off people in the Heights.  There are at least a half dozen different lots up and down N. Shep and Durham that would work just fine for a storage facility.  But it almost seems like someone purposefully sought out a historic building in the middle of the Heights to have the doubly crushing blow of tearing down a historic theater and putting up a giant storage facility right in the heart of the neighborhood.  

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https://www.houstonchronicle.com/neighborhood/bellaire/news/article/Heights-residents-fear-demolition-of-historic-15822312.php

Heights’ residents fear demolition of historic buildings after Stude Theater becomes storage facility

By Ryan Nickerson, Staff writer Dec. 22, 2020

The Heights’ Stude Theater was demolished and will be replaced by a seven-story Big Tex Storage Facility, according to the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation.

Having opened in 1939, the building was an independent movie theater until 1957, when it became the church for the Resurrection Life Fellowship. The building retained its authentic marquee and vintage theater structure, but the church’s crown with the words “Our God Reigns” remained above the marquee until the building’s demolition.

Some Heights residents have been concerned about the destruction of many historical buildings over the past decade, while others are more concerned about what is replacing the buildings.
 

“It’s bad enough we lost another piece of history here,” Heights resident Fred Lindner said. “But what’s even worse is what’s taking its place, which is affront to this community.”

Although the Stude Theater wasn’t as devastating of a loss for the community as the demolition of Fitzgerald’s or the Ashland Tea House, residents hope they are not being desensitized to historic buildings getting torn down due to area development.

“I think there should be some sort of, if not historic protection for these buildings, at a minimum, I think there needs to be some sort of ordinance on it,” Lindner said.

One of the biggest concerns about the anticipated storage facility is that it is going to be the tallest structure in the area — a tall, black, windowless structure that residents fear is going to be an eyesore.

“Something like this just doesn’t belong in the neighborhood,” Lindner said.

“It can go up on a major thoroughfare and go up on the loop on a highway, but not in the middle of the neighborhood.”

Resident Viula Torgerson is also more concerned about the storage facility than the church’s destruction.

She fears the walkability of the neighborhood is threatened by the storage facility because most of the buildings in the area are old enough to not have “busy driveways and parking lots.”
 
“It’s going to be this giant, windowless, corrugated metal monster right there towering over all the buildings around it,” Torgerson said.

“And it’s just really sad.”

Torgerson remembers a time, before the pandemic, when her two sons could walk around the neighborhood and shop at local bakeries and restaurants, but she feels like the increase in area development hinders their ability to do that.

“It’s sad when Houston loses its history, which it does every day,” Torgerson said.

“This is not the worst of those situations but when you take away something historic and put something that adds no value to the community at all in its place, it’s like the worst of the worst.”

ryan.nickerson@hcnonline.com

Edited by hindesky
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25 minutes ago, gmac said:

Would you feel any different if this was replaced with a dozen (or more) condos to increase density?

There are an absurd amount of empty lots in this city that can be filled up first, then the surface lots, then the shitty stucco strip malls, then...

We have so much space to add density without destroying historic structures. 

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I get being upset about a seven story storage facility, it’s an eyesore. But to act like the building it’s replacing is a huge loss or historical in any way is laughable. This section of 11th was always destined for densification. Just look what’s happening further down 11th and around 19th and 20th. If this monstrosity of a storage building came AFTER other densification (e.g mid-rises and retail) then hardly anyone would care. 
 

if this replaced a hand car wash or church parking lot on 11th then it would be getting the same reaction from NIMBY residents. Nothing to do with “history”. 

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2 hours ago, LBC2HTX said:

I get being upset about a seven story storage facility, it’s an eyesore. But to act like the building it’s replacing is a huge loss or historical in any way is laughable. This section of 11th was always destined for densification. Just look what’s happening further down 11th and around 19th and 20th. If this monstrosity of a storage building came AFTER other densification (e.g mid-rises and retail) then hardly anyone would care. 
 

if this replaced a hand car wash or church parking lot on 11th then it would be getting the same reaction from NIMBY residents. Nothing to do with “history”. 

This property was left out of the Historic Districts.  So, the owner was free to demolish it and shame on us for not having it included in the district.  But 11th is nothing like 19th and 20th.  The majority of the street frontage on 11th is either single family residential or small 1-2 story retail/commercial.  This section of the Heights has mostly very small lots abutting 11th and was never destined for densification.  

And if you think the theater was an eyesore, how in the world is a seven story storage facility an improvement?  The owner of this lot could sell the land and probably have enough money to buy a larger lot on N. Shep or Durham.  This is just a stupid place to put a storage facility.  The Heights is not what it was fifteen years ago when no one wanted to build anything in the neighborhood.  The neighborhood has some of the best new developments in Houston.  You can call people "NIMBYs" all day, but that doesn't mean that putting a storage facility on 11th is a good idea.  

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4 hours ago, LBC2HTX said:

I get being upset about a seven story storage facility, it’s an eyesore. But to act like the building it’s replacing is a huge loss or historical in any way is laughable. This section of 11th was always destined for densification. Just look what’s happening further down 11th and around 19th and 20th. If this monstrosity of a storage building came AFTER other densification (e.g mid-rises and retail) then hardly anyone would care. 
 

if this replaced a hand car wash or church parking lot on 11th then it would be getting the same reaction from NIMBY residents. Nothing to do with “history”. 

Umm yeah because it was neglected. Had the building been restored, it would have been beautiful. Densification has nothing to do with this. You can build smart and still be dense. Plus plenty of us in the Heights aren't happy about this for good reason. 

Edited by j_cuevas713
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This property was left out of the Historic Districts.  So, the owner was free to demolish it and shame on us for not having it included in the district.  But 11th is nothing like 19th and 20th.  The majority of the street frontage on 11th is either single family residential or small 1-2 story retail/commercial.  This section of the Heights has mostly very small lots abutting 11th and was never destined for densification.  

And if you think the theater was an eyesore, how in the world is a seven story storage facility an improvement?  The owner of this lot could sell the land and probably have enough money to buy a larger lot on N. Shep or Durham.  This is just a stupid place to put a storage facility.  The Heights is not what it was fifteen years ago when no one wanted to build anything in the neighborhood.  The neighborhood has some of the best new developments in Houston.  You can call people "NIMBYs" all day, but that doesn't mean that putting a storage facility on 11th is a good idea.  

11th is mostly a commercial corridor from Michaux to Yale. Yes, it’s mostly 1 and 2 story buildings, but that’s exactly what most places are like before densification. If you didn’t think this would happen on 11th then you haven’t been paying attention to everything else happening in the Heights. You only need to look at 1111 studewood to know this was coming to this part of 11th.

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Even if you're expecting development, it's perfectly reasonable to be upset about this specific development. A storage facility is a huge waste of this spot, and, even though the old theater wasn't much to look at, it represented the potential to be reused as something good. 

Storage facilities are super cheap to build and maintain and provide guaranteed income with minimal future expenditures. Like surface parking lots downtown. And they're terrible. Houston does not need more storage facilities. I don't support explicit regulation of use on private land, but I do think there have to be options for the City to actively disincentivize stuff like this.  

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1 hour ago, s3mh said:

This property was left out of the Historic Districts.  So, the owner was free to demolish it and shame on us for not having it included in the district.  But 11th is nothing like 19th and 20th.  The majority of the street frontage on 11th is either single family residential or small 1-2 story retail/commercial.  This section of the Heights has mostly very small lots abutting 11th and was never destined for densification.  

And if you think the theater was an eyesore, how in the world is a seven story storage facility an improvement?  The owner of this lot could sell the land and probably have enough money to buy a larger lot on N. Shep or Durham.  This is just a stupid place to put a storage facility.  The Heights is not what it was fifteen years ago when no one wanted to build anything in the neighborhood.  The neighborhood has some of the best new developments in Houston.  You can call people "NIMBYs" all day, but that doesn't mean that putting a storage facility on 11th is a good idea.  

There are already storage places on Shepherd and Durham. The storage place developers presumably did some sort of market research, and found a need for a storage unit location in this area. At some point, we will achieve peak storage unit, and will quit seeing new ones being developed. I will also assume that the storage unit developers made the best offer to the church for the property. The deed doesn't mention sales price, so any financing did not result in a lien on the property.

 

 

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59 minutes ago, j_cuevas713 said:

Umm yeah because it was neglected. Had the building been restored, it would have been beautiful. Densification has nothing to do with this. You can build smart and still be dense. Plus plenty of us in the Heights aren't happy about this for good reason. 

Clearly no one was willing to restore it.   The level of unhappiness isn’t a surprise. The heights is full of NIMBYs who have only moved there within the last 10 years. 
 

As I said, the NIMBYs would be up in arms even if this was being built on an empty lot. This has nothing to do with “historical preservation”. 

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15 minutes ago, LBC2HTX said:

Clearly no one was willing to restore it.   The level of unhappiness isn’t a surprise. The heights is full of NIMBYs who have only moved there within the last 10 years. 
 

As I said, the NIMBYs would be up in arms even if this was being built on an empty lot. This has nothing to do with “historical preservation”. 

So you're calling me a NIMBY? No actually if it was built on an empty lot I wouldn't complain. Not sure what your overall stance on historic preservation actually is, but it sounds pretty damn nearsighted

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Like I originally said, I understand being upset with a 7 story storage center. It’s an eyesore and a symbol of American excess. However, these developments are everywhere inside the loop. In any case, I’m all for historic preservation of actual historic places, just not preservation of old dilapidated buildings that have been neglected for decades and weren’t even notable when originally built.
 

I’m going to call BS on that given the reaction to the apartments under construction on 6 1/2 street (behind onion creek), as well as the proposed automated parking structure on White Oak.

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11th is mostly a commercial corridor from Michaux to Yale. Yes, it’s mostly 1 and 2 story buildings, but that’s exactly what most places are like before densification. If you didn’t think this would happen on 11th then you haven’t been paying attention to everything else happening in the Heights. You only need to look at 1111 studewood to know this was coming to this part of 11th.

You are right.  When they announced the development of 1111 Studewood almost ten years ago, everyone knew that it was only a matter of time before a seven story storage facility would pop up on 11th St because developers started building apartments almost two miles away.    

 

 

I’m going to call BS on that given the reaction to the apartments under construction on 6 1/2 street (behind onion creek), as well as the proposed automated parking structure on White Oak.

We were pissed about those too.

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There are already storage places on Shepherd and Durham. The storage place developers presumably did some sort of market research, and found a need for a storage unit location in this area. At some point, we will achieve peak storage unit, and will quit seeing new ones being developed. I will also assume that the storage unit developers made the best offer to the church for the property. The deed doesn't mention sales price, so any financing did not result in a lien on the property.

 

 

There is only one storage place on N. Shep and Durham.  Storage facilities are clustered all around each other in Houston.  It is just like car dealerships.  They want to all be in the same area so you do not have to go far if you don't find what you want at your competition.  No one in Woodland Heights is going to pick Big Tex over Storage West because it is barely a mile closer.  

And screw all the "guy with the biggest bag of money gets to ruin the neighborhood" bs.  This is an incredibly stupid use of this property.  It does absolutely nothing for the neighborhood.  

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2 hours ago, s3mh said:

There is only one storage place on N. Shep and Durham.  Storage facilities are clustered all around each other in Houston.  It is just like car dealerships.  They want to all be in the same area so you do not have to go far if you don't find what you want at your competition.  No one in Woodland Heights is going to pick Big Tex over Storage West because it is barely a mile closer.  

And screw all the "guy with the biggest bag of money gets to ruin the neighborhood" bs.  This is an incredibly stupid use of this property.  It does absolutely nothing for the neighborhood.  

You are right.  When they announced the development of 1111 Studewood almost ten years ago, everyone knew that it was only a matter of time before a seven story storage facility would pop up on 11th St because developers started building apartments almost two miles away.    

Are you saying that the church should have consulted with the neighbors before selling, and received endorsement for the buyer? Are you saying that the church shouldn't have been able to sell for the highest amount possible if the buyer wasn't "acceptable"? This is Houston, where sellers get to take the highest bid, and buyers get to build pretty much whatever they want.

1111 Studewood is not two miles away from this location. It's hardly 2 blocks.

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2 hours ago, s3mh said:

You are right.  When they announced the development of 1111 Studewood... almost two miles away.

WHAT? This is the unappealing 6 story building behind someburger. Literally across 11th street from this project. 

2 hours ago, s3mh said:

We were pissed about those too.

That’s my point. Bunch of NIMBYs.

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Whether or not the property owner and developer were in the right, can we all just agree for once that building a multistory self-storage warehouse on top of what had been one of the last historic movie theaters on a sidewalk fronting lot in the city is just like dropping a massive wet turd and why Houston can't be nice like other cities?

Call me a NIMBY if you want, but you know people do vote with their dollars and feet when it comes to where they prefer to live and work. It's why people from other cities look down on us. If Houston preserved its historic commercial buildings and streetscapes better it would have higher property values and attract the people who would pay for that.

Edited by zaphod
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1 hour ago, zaphod said:

Whether or not the property owner and developer were in the right, can we all just agree for once that building a multistory self-storage warehouse on top of what had been one of the last historic movie theaters on a sidewalk fronting lot in the city is just like dropping a massive wet turd and why Houston can't be nice like other cities?

Call me a NIMBY if you want, but you know people do vote with their dollars and feet when it comes to where they prefer to live and work. It's why people from other cities look down on us. If Houston preserved its historic commercial buildings and streetscapes better it would have higher property values and attract the people who would pay for that.

I can't agree that it's like dropping a big wet one there. The new owner obviously believes there is a market for the product he plans to offer. Houston is actually nice like other cities, and even better in some respects, as it doesn't generally force property owners to abide by some vague aesthetic view promulgated by self proclaimed experts. 

What do you think should have been built there? Would you put, say, a million of your own dollars into making the theater something else? How do you propose to ensure that property owners get maximum value when they sell, while still satisfying your desire for preservation of old(nothing in the Heights is historic) buildings?

I am not against keeping old buildings, but the owners need to have a say in the process, and not have rules changed on them in the middle of their ownership, like the historic district ordinance did, forcing some people to sell when they were unable to modify their property to meet their needs.

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  • 5 weeks later...
1 hour ago, s3mh said:

Of course, this won't go anywhere and the stupid storage place will get built.  But it is a positive sign that Heights residents have not given up and still have some fight left in them.  

 

https://www.stopbigtexstorage.org/

The Ashby folks might claim copyright infringement for the angry toothy building image... :ph34r:

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2 hours ago, s3mh said:

Of course, this won't go anywhere and the stupid storage place will get built.  But it is a positive sign that Heights residents have not given up and still have some fight left in them.  

 

https://www.stopbigtexstorage.org/

Even if this thing still gets built, hopefully it puts pressure on the city to revise the preservation ordinance.

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6 hours ago, s3mh said:

Of course, this won't go anywhere and the stupid storage place will get built.  But it is a positive sign that Heights residents have not given up and still have some fight left in them.  

 

https://www.stopbigtexstorage.org/

The developer is from Dallas?!? Definitely cannot allow this to move forward now.

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  • Highrise Tower changed the title to Big Tex Storage The Heights: 7-Story Storage At 730 E. 11th

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