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There are variance request signs for the portion east of Dunlavy that claim a hearing is happening April 24th or 28th (I already forgot). But I have to think that if the developers are thinking this thing is dead, they wouldn't be moving forward for approval to scrape the other 300 units that are generating income.

Once upon a time someone from Regent came on here and said one of the reasons for the delay had to do with the fact they were going to be able to build faster than anticipated and pushed the date back for some reason. Is there any possiblity that they are waiting to clear out the whole property and do it all at once instead of in phases? I'm not a real estate person, just a guy that likes buildings. I'm curious as to your opinions about whether there is any benefit to proceeding this way.

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Did some quick photoshop during my break of both Hanover and GID put together.   Existing Conditions:     Full Build Out of both Develepments:     Now

Website finally updated!!   http://regentsquarehouston.com/

New Master plan with a number of tenants in mind   http://www.wordsearch.co.uk/work/regent-square/  

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I think Houston-Development is confusing you with somebody else from a different thread that was genuinely being a jackass.

if that is the case, bpe has my sincere apologies.

it was similar writing style and broad generalizations.

again, if it wasn't him, im sorry for making that assumption.

ps - i, like ricco, am proud of my jackassedness but only to the appropriate parties.

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  • 4 weeks later...
our (mine) favorite project has made some changes...

http://swamplot.com/going-straight-regent-...3/#comment-1099

is it just me or does the scope of the project seem much smaller in this new rendering? the report says it's remaining at 24 acres, but the original siteplan looks to encompass a much larger tract of land.

regardless, this is still a very exciting project... fantastic location.

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is it just me or does the scope of the project seem much smaller in this new rendering? the report says it's remaining at 24 acres, but the original siteplan looks to encompass a much larger tract of land.

regardless, this is still a very exciting project... fantastic location.

This phase 1 appears to encompass the same land as the original phase 1. The original plan also shows phase 2, which still has the apartments on it.

I wouldn't say this looks all that different to me. I know they have a variance scheduled for May 22. I think this is still looking very cool. Hope it works out.

What we need now is a pedestrian bridge over allen parkway at Dunlavy. I know I could walk down to Waugh, but it would be nice to be able to cross without recreating a game of frogger.

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I wouldn't say this looks all that different to me. I know they have a variance scheduled for May 22. I think this is still looking very cool. Hope it works out.

it looks to me like the changes leave out green space previously there :(

But it also looks like the new buildings have more floors.

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Wow. There's a lot less green space. There also appears to be about 5 times as much surface parking. Much of it is "hidden" behind the project but I feel sorry for the folks who live across the street on the "backside" of Regent Square!

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Wow. There's a lot less green space. There also appears to be about 5 times as much surface parking. Much of it is "hidden" behind the project but I feel sorry for the folks who live across the street on the "backside" of Regent Square!

There does not appear to be any surface parking. All four of those "surface lots" appear in the 3-D drawings to be garages. Click on swamplot's link to the drawings posted earlier to see the 3-D versions.

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We live on Tirrell St, on the backside of the development. It is a parking garage across the street (we were told it'll look nice), not a parking lot, but it was there in the original renderings. As for the green space, we're all for it, but it seems that most of it that was lost was in interior courtyards, something we probably couldn't use ourselves.

As for the variances (we get them by mail automatically since we live so close) IIRC, they are for small sight triangles at some of the intersections (something like 12' instead of the usual 15'). I'm all for that...12' is a lot better than the 3' the W Dallas & Tirrell intersection has now with those bushes...I'm halfway into W Dallas before I can see west-bound traffic!

What we are most excited for is our "Road to Kroger" (the diagonal road from W Dallas to W Clay)...we have a bit of a detour now. However, Marvy's Whole Foods just east of here will probably make that less of an issue.

Finally, do we think Regent Sq. will have a hotel? My guess is that is what the cul-de-sac just south of W Dallas is for.

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There does not appear to be any surface parking. All four of those "surface lots" appear in the 3-D drawings to be garages. Click on swamplot's link to the drawings posted earlier to see the 3-D versions.

Nope, Red. There are a total of 12 surface parking spaces.

The horror, the horror. :rolleyes:

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Nope, Red. There are a total of 12 surface parking spaces.

The horror, the horror. :rolleyes:

Niche -- please say you aren't sure. In the original drawings and the first set of revisions that were released yesterday it looked like those surface lots were actually roof parking.

I hope that they are. There is a lot of good activity going on in the neighborhood right now -- I think this place could help it reach a critical mass. I don't want to be a doom and gloomer.

And as an edit... I don't see driveways for those lots. And they have structural thingies (architecture term) at the corners. I want to believe, dammit!!!

Edit again.. I noticed you said spaces, not lots, Niche. I'm accustomed to thinking lots. As you can tell, I'm architecturally shellshocked.

Edited by capnmcbarnacle
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Looks pretty freaking cool... Houston doesn't have anything like this. Phase II seems pretty sweet too. Hopefully the trend continues.

This project reminds me of West Village in Uptown Dallas, except somewhat larger it seems.

This is by far my favorite Houston project. It's like 20 projects in one, and the synergy it'll bring will be unmatched IMO.

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This project is excellent.

I just wish it was being built along either the light rail line or one that is planned for in the future. It's been awhile, but I do think there is bus service down West Dallas but none on West Gray or Allen Parkway. Is that right?

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I think the Inner Katy line is not too far from here. Maybe a trolley service or something (maybe like the McKinney Streetcar in Dallas), could be built.

Nice renderings by the way.

Edited by Trae
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I just wish it was being built along either the light rail line or one that is planned for in the future. It's been awhile, but I do think there is bus service down West Dallas but none on West Gray or Allen Parkway. Is that right?

I agree, the only downside is the fact that Ill have to drive to get there.

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you don't have to drive, you choose to drive.

This isn't necessarily bad, but just an observation. How come guys like you, niche and red never say yall like developments. Maybe yall do and I just miss it. But it's either an objective opinion which is fine, or it's negative. But almost never any compliments.

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This isn't necessarily bad, but just an observation. How come guys like you, niche and red never say yall like developments. Maybe yall do and I just miss it. But it's either an objective opinion which is fine, or it's negative. But almost never any compliments.

i can't speak for niche or red, but i don't think i've ever said that. like life in general, there are good things and bad things. a question for you are there any bad projects?

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I can't speak for Lockmat, but I will say that they are some badly planned projects. Some also would be best in better locations (so the actual project may be great, but located sucks).

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i can't speak for niche or red, but i don't think i've ever said that. like life in general, there are good things and bad things. a question for you are there any bad projects?

What do you mean you've never said that? Said what? I don't think I said you ever said anything. I pointed out what you have not said. But it's ok. Just an observation.

My opinion is different just b/c I don't live where many of them are taken place. But honestly I like most of them goin up, but there are certain aspects of some of them I don't like, like the garages for Cosmopolitan and the Titan.

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My opinion is different just b/c I don't live where many of them are taken place. But honestly I like most of them goin up, but there are certain aspects of some of them I don't like, like the garages for Cosmopolitan and the Titan.

for me it's more than just the project but how it affects the area as well. in some instances, the second is more detrimental than the first.

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I agree, the only downside is the fact that Ill have to drive to get there.

What, you're too good to take the bus? The 3, 18, 48 and 313 all run directly to this location from downtown via Gray, Dallas and Allen Parkway.

This isn't necessarily bad, but just an observation. How come guys like you, niche and red never say yall like developments. Maybe yall do and I just miss it. But it's either an objective opinion which is fine, or it's negative. But almost never any compliments.

There are usually so many "This is great!" posts that I do not feel the need to add to them. I do try to be objective, since the "This is great!" posts add nothing to the conversation. And, I do admit that correcting an inaccurate post can come off as negative. For what it is worth, I DO like this project. But, at the same time, it will almost certainly be aimed at the "upscale" resident and shopper, so, other than the occasional restaurant visit, it is not a place where I will spend a lot of time. But, I do recognize its value to the area.

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What, you're too good to take the bus? The 3, 18, 48 and 313 all run directly to this location from downtown via Gray, Dallas and Allen Parkway.

THIS IS GOOD TO KNOW. I DON'T EVER RECALL SEEING BUSES ON ALLEN PARKWAY BUT I AM GLAD THEY RUN THAT ROUTE.

There are usually so many "This is great!" posts that I do not feel the need to add to them. I do try to be objective, since the "This is great!" posts add nothing to the conversation. And, I do admit that correcting an inaccurate post can come off as negative. For what it is worth, I DO like this project. But, at the same time, it will almost certainly be aimed at the "upscale" resident and shopper, so, other than the occasional restaurant visit, it is not a place where I will spend a lot of time. But, I do recognize its value to the area.

In the end, I like these types of projects Inside the Loop. A key for good development in my opinion is one in which car trips can be minimized. This one does that for the residents. They can walk to a dry cleaners or to dinner. They can even walk to Kroger's and a movie on West Gray. Getting cars off of the road is what Houston needs to focus on. Smart developments and transit options can do that.

Now, if only we'd have more of these types of projects on the rail line...

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Looks like they're trying to pull off a more traditional style here than what is usually found in these new developments (ie: Post Midtown, BLVD Place, etc), but I find the designs a tad more convincing than many other developments that try their hand at such a style (ie: West Ave). I appreciate the architectural subtleties in most of the buildings; they do not attempt to over festoon most of them with trite and stereotypical neoclassical elements, such as quoins, keystones, etc.

Furthermore, it also looks like the majority of it will be clad in solid masonry; here's to hoping that those stucco looking structures are not actually done in EIFS.

I'm just hoping that the actual results will be just as convincing as these renderings.

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There are usually so many "This is great!" posts that I do not feel the need to add to them. I do try to be objective, since the "This is great!" posts add nothing to the conversation. And, I do admit that correcting an inaccurate post can come off as negative. For what it is worth, I DO like this project. But, at the same time, it will almost certainly be aimed at the "upscale" resident and shopper, so, other than the occasional restaurant visit, it is not a place where I will spend a lot of time. But, I do recognize its value to the area.

I understand. But I guess everyone has their place. Someone has to (at least when it actually is) say, "This is great!", right? ha

And I don't mind corrective posts, I like them. It's just that some people don't use a very nice tone when doing it.

for me it's more than just the project but how it affects the area as well. in some instances, the second is more detrimental than the first.

I agree. Unfortunately that's the part that is hard for me to weigh in on since I don't live ITL nor do I frequent it as often as I'd like to.

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What, you're too good to take the bus? The 3, 18, 48 and 313 all run directly to this location from downtown via Gray, Dallas and Allen Parkway.

You're right Red, there shouldn't be anything wrong with taking a bus. I've just been discouraged so many times after having to wait ridiculous times for transfers that I now try to avoid it. I am perfectly happy with taking the rail (I do it nearly every day) and haven't had any problems with it. I am lucky because I can walk to the Museum District station.

When I first moved here I relied 100% on the bus (mostly Bissonnet and Richmond). I remember too many times waiting 30 minutes at a bus stop with no benches my first summer here. Anyways, hopefully they have some decent routes between this place and Downtown. If so, that could work for me. It's not that I'm too good for the bus. I guess I just didn't realize there were direct routes from Downtown. I still wish it was on one of the proposed rail lines...

Edited by Jax
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This project is fantastic...I can't wait to watch some dirt to begin turning. I think in light of gas being 5 to 6 dollars by the time this project is up and running, you will see a great deal of suburbanites moving to a project like this....

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Saying "This is great!" adds a whole lot more to the conversation than posts some people make just to pick on other members.

This does look fantastic in the renderings. To me the hardest thing is visualizing this amount of development density on the Allen House site. That said, I tend to be a bit suspicious of the "mixed use" concept. Unless the retail and business components are very specifically targeted, I suspect that residents will continue to do most of their shopping elsewhere, and most shoppers and workers will drive in from elsewhere. We shall see.

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This project will never get off the ground!

It will be nothing but a parking lot and it will look nothing like the renderings and will be a total architectural disappointment.

:unsure:

Did I miss anything?

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This project will never get off the ground!

It will be nothing but a parking lot and it will look nothing like the renderings and will be a total architectural disappointment.

:unsure:

Did I miss anything?

Well, played, sir. ;)

I agree with Subdude, however. There comes a point when mixed-use needs to be very community specific. When the retailers don't match the residents' demographics (or at least reaches a point where much of it doesn't match the demographics) then you begin to lose some of the project's original focus. Will it truly be an urban neighborhood if a greater mix of the clientelle ends up driving in from elsewhere?

And so on.

So far, it seems West Ave, in this respect, seems to be off to a good start. Then again, it's slated to be a smaller project overall.

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I agree with Subdude, however. There comes a point when mixed-use needs to be very community specific. When the retailers don't match the residents' demographics (or at least reaches a point where much of it doesn't match the demographics) then you begin to lose some of the project's original focus. Will it truly be an urban neighborhood if a greater mix of the clientelle ends up driving in from elsewhere?

And so on.

So far, it seems West Ave, in this respect, seems to be off to a good start. Then again, it's slated to be a smaller project overall.

But we don't know of any tenants yet, right? And who knows, while this project is grand in scale it still seems to be modest, at least in architecture. So maybe the the tenants will to...or not. We'll see.

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But we don't know of any tenants yet, right? And who knows, while this project is grand in scale it still seems to be modest, at least in architecture. So maybe the the tenants will to...or not. We'll see.

:lol:

lockmat, put down the mushroom tea. The location of this development (to the east of River Oaks) all but REQUIRES that the tenant mix be the same stuffy, overpriced retailers that one finds to the west and south of River Oaks...oh, and a Subway.

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This isn't necessarily bad, but just an observation. How come guys like you, niche and red never say yall like developments. Maybe yall do and I just miss it. But it's either an objective opinion which is fine, or it's negative. But almost never any compliments.

In this case, because the scale is impressive, but the architecture itself is canned neotraditional blah. It isn't terrible, like the condo towers in S. Padre that you recently posted about, but also isn't any Pennzoil Place. Considering the location and size, it is appropriate to meet market demand. Only appropriate. And that just doesn't warrant particular comment.

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:lol:

lockmat, put down the mushroom tea. The location of this development (to the east of River Oaks) all but REQUIRES that the tenant mix be the same stuffy, overpriced retailers that one finds to the west and south of River Oaks...oh, and a Subway.

So why is subdude worried about there being the right tenant mix for the community? If it is stuffy, it'll fit right in.

In this case, because the scale is impressive, but the architecture itself is canned neotraditional blah. It isn't terrible, like the condo towers in S. Padre that you recently posted about, but also isn't any Pennzoil Place. Considering the location and size, it is appropriate to meet market demand. Only appropriate. And that just doesn't warrant particular comment.

True, but at least it isn't trying too hard like The Woodlands Market Street faux.

Edited by lockmat
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I'm just hoping that the actual results will be just as convincing as these renderings.

This is another thing. The end project is usually not as attractive as the rendering, and I can't recall even one that looks better than the rendering. What you see is the best possible outcome.

I'm hesitant to proclaim a project great because of a great rendering, but if the rendering already sucks, I'm inclined to think that the end product built to those specs is going to look at least as bad.

And of course, there's always the possibility that the rendering gets thrown out.

Saying "This is great!" adds a whole lot more to the conversation than posts some people make just to pick on other members.

FWIW, lockmat's question did seem to spur some meaningful commentary. I don't mind being prodded now and again.

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So why is subdude worried about there being the right tenant mix for the community? If it is stuffy, it'll fit right in.

I don't know. Maybe he'll chime back in. This is one development that the price of rents would seem to guarantee that the resident and retailers match.

True, but at least it isn't trying too hard like The Woodlands Market Street faux.

Good description of Market Street. They are simply trying too hard.

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This is another thing. The end project is usually not as attractive as the rendering, and I can't recall even one that looks better than the rendering. What you see is the best possible outcome.

Of course the rendering will attempt to present a product in the best possible light; they are trying to sell it to someone/a certain demographic after all.

What I meant regarding my previous statement was the desire for that the subtleties and such portrayed in the renderings to be preserved in real life once the project is completed, or at least for some sort of resemblance to the projections.

As someone stated above, I at least appreciate the fact that the architecture is not going on an excessively trite level, like Market Street. This is perfect example of a project which is overly encrusted with neoclassical elements; it has more of a superficial appeal to superficial people who want to have the "canned Disneyland experience" (complete with the long waits, and overpriced crap) without the idiots in suits parading about. At least in RS, the so called "canned" architectural elements are applied in a much more reserved manner; there is less "makeup" applied to the facades. Sure, it may still be somewhat superficial, but at least it is somewhat more convincing than the other examples.

While we are on this note; perhaps you could show us examples of architecture and projects from recent history, and modern times that you do appreciate, eh Niche? ;)

Edited by UrbaNerd
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Stitched 'em up...

n159900085_30299584_9457.jpg

n159900085_30299581_8249.jpg

n159900085_30299582_8761.jpg

n159900085_30299585_3839.jpg

I believe this is gonna be one place where people will walk around and think, "I'm not in Kansas anymore." I think it's gonna feel real homey(sp?).

post-723-1211763247_thumb.jpg

Edited by lockmat
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So why is subdude worried about there being the right tenant mix for the community? If it is stuffy, it'll fit right in.

Well, that's the thing.

Perhaps if the developers included some subsidized housing in their plans, the 'urban experience' might be a trifle more authentic.

These socialist, commie ideas seem to work pretty well in Toronto.

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Of course the rendering will attempt to present a product in the best possible light; they are trying to sell it to someone/a certain demographic after all.

What I meant regarding my previous statement was the desire for that the subtleties and such portrayed in the renderings to be preserved in real life once the project is completed, or at least for some sort of resemblance to the projections.

As someone stated above, I at least appreciate the fact that the architecture is not going on an excessively trite level, like Market Street. This is perfect example of a project which is overly encrusted with neoclassical elements; it has more of a superficial appeal to superficial people who want to have the "canned Disneyland experience" (complete with the long waits, and overpriced crap) without the idiots in suits parading about. At least in RS, the so called "canned" architectural elements are applied in a much more reserved manner; there is less "makeup" applied to the facades. Sure, it may still be somewhat superficial, but at least it is somewhat more convincing than the other examples.

While we are on this note; perhaps you could show us examples of architecture and projects from recent history, and modern times that you do appreciate, eh Niche? ;)

roadrunner is spot on. It looks like Boston. ...well aside from that odd concrete form in the last rendering, hanging in the sky with sparkling light underneath it. I'm not sure what to make of that.

But I thought the exact same thing when I first saw lockmat's post. And it probably looks like Boston because that's where the developers are from. That something is a more convincing fake doesn't add a whole lot of value in my eyes. It is what it is, and whether a fake with class or a fake without class, it is a fake.

Examples of recent buildings/renderings that I like: Memorial Hermann Medical Plaza, Mosaic, and nearly anything developed by Hines (including their parking garage on Main).

Older product that I like is all over the place in Houston. Our boomtimes were in a good moment of architectural histroy, IMO, and I'm thankful that we don't have all the cheesy spires of Atlanta. I'm not even sure where to start, except to say that from time to time, an angle of a building that I've seen a hundred times will pop out at me as being just magnificent...large buildings and small buildings alike.

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