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Downtown Hotel Market


futuredeveloper85

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It just came to me that the only decent looking large chain hotel ion downtown Houston is the Hilton Americas connected to the GRB. The Hyatt looks horrible, and so does the Doubletree, the exterior of these hotels in downtown need to be updated soon...

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The exteriors of those buildings may be very plain, but all have undergone major interior renovations in the last three or four years. And they really aren't any worse looking outside than many of the other buildings downtown.

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not to mention the ugly orange/brownish brick of the Four Seasons hotel across from the Houston Center. It frustrates me that none of these buildings feel they need to update themselves into the look of the 21st century.

I think that one is kinda cool. Why does everything have to look like cutting edge 21st century? The world would be quite boring if everything was new, fresh and up to date.

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Oh my god!! I guest we need to get cracking on the Warrick. I mean those bricks old architectural detailing on the outside are so outdated. Maybe some metal plating, glass and smooth stone would help.

I have no problems with these hotels. I don't think people avoid going to them because of their exterior. The name and reputation gets these people going to them. And they are all quite nice on the inside.

It just like the Exxon building. Many peole think its hideous and old looking with that frame on the outside. I think it is quite beautiful. Updating on the outside should only restore the building to it orginal state. Unless the building has a checkered past that needs to be covered up.

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Updating on the outside should only restore the building to it orginal state. Unless the building has a checkered past that needs to be covered up.

Time to remodel the Enron building! :lol:

Actually, the two largest downtown exterior remodelings/"modernizations" lately have been hotels: the Inn at the Ballpark and the Crown PLaza. Neither, imo, strike me as Masterpieces of Architecture. On the other hand, the restored hotels (Sam Houston, Magnolia, Icon, and Club Quarters) generally seem pretty nice, although the windows on the Sam Houston are all wrong.

Point taken that the Hyatt exterior looks horrible, but it's hard to see what could be done with it, especially now that it has been foreclosed. The Doubletree just kind of comes off as anonymous. I think it's a fairly safe bet that one or more of these hotels will end up shutting down due to ongoing low occupancy.

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This is the exact reason why all the old majestic homes that used to line the streets of Westmoreland are mostly gone. I'm talking the homes that used to belong to the big Houston families. Unfortunately, they were just too old-fashioned and outdated and were razed.

You have to wonder what people are going to think of the old Hyatt or Four Seasons in another 70+ years. Will it be classic architecture to our grandchildren?

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Well coming from senior architecture major I think more could be done with the buildings. Considering Houston wants more conventions, and special events, the exterior of places where people will be staying plays a critical role in how our city comes off to visitors. The Four Seasons looks horrible, and more needs to be done than pressure washing. On the other hand I am rather impressed with the hotels in the Galleria area.

- Terrance G.

The Future is in our hands...

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I don't think the creator of the thread was talking about every hotel downtown, just the big chain ones like Four Seasons, Hilton, Hyatt, and Doubletree. I hope that is what he is talking about, becaue I happen to like the smaller boutique hotels such as ICON, Lancaster, Sam Houston, and Magnolia.

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I don't think the creator of the thread was talking about every hotel downtown, just the big chain ones like Four Seasons, Hilton, Hyatt, and Doubletree.  I hope that is what he is talking about, becaue I happen to like the smaller boutique hotels such as ICON, Lancaster, Sam Houston, and Magnolia.

I am the creator, and I did mean the large chain hotels. THanks for pointing that out, I love the boutique hotels also...

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If we're talking about fairly bland looking buildings, then what about the Waldorf Astoria in NYC?

Hotels are known for their service, comfort, and amenities and NOT for their appearences.

Hotel Derek is bland, but is sees a considerable amount of business. The Intercontintenal Hotel on 610 is good looking, but people flock to it all the time.

C'mon people, we're a bit TOO critical on the looks of something as opposed to the actual functionality and performance.

Lord knows I've been in a number of good looking homes which are poorly designed as far as the interior spaces go.

Ricco

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  • 1 month later...

Nothing major has happened to really turn people off from traveling other than ever increasing gas prices but considering the number of conventions that were book for 2005 and 2006, the growth in occupancy rates was expected. The biggest question is how much of a jump will actually be seen in 2006. Next year's All-Star Weekend (NBA) might help as well as the Big 12 Championship game later this year.

I'd be most interested to see which hotels are doing the best.

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That's good news to hear - More chain hotels need to be built downtown. The economy and trade within the Houston city limits needs to become more and more centered in Downtown.

The chains that do not have a hotel in Downtown include:

* Marriott

* Ritz-Carlton (Especially since the old Uptown hotel is now a St. Regis)

* Sheraton (perhaps a W Hotel - Houston needs a W Hotel)

* Sonesta

* Wyndham

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Good news, especially considering the big influx of new hotel space over the past couple years. I hope it continues to improve. Like Hizzy, I'm curious which hotels are showing improvement.

Funny, downtown used to have both a Sonesta and Sheraton, but no mas.

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That's good news to hear - More chain hotels need to be built downtown. The economy and trade within the Houston city limits needs to become more and more centered in Downtown.

The chains that do not have a hotel in Downtown include:

* Marriott

* Ritz-Carlton (Especially since the old Uptown hotel is now a St. Regis)

* Sheraton (perhaps a W Hotel - Houston needs a W Hotel)

* Sonesta

* Wyndham

Marriott had planned a Renaissance Hotel downtown, in the old Texaco building, but that project is now on hold. I'm sure once the market recovers Marriott will jump on the opportunity for a full-service hotel downtown if they can be assured of its success. At least they do have a Courtyard and Residence Inn downtown.

The others are probably in the same situation. Sonesta, and Wyndham to a certain extent, are more niche brands and may be harder to lure. But I'm sure Marriott and Starwood (Sheraton, W, Westin, St. Regis) would be downtown if the demand was there.

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Well, it's a sure bet that Marriott knew these numbers before we did...and are analyzing them carefully. As soon as they believe that the numbers are going where they need to be, Texaco will restart. I hope it is soon, since Minute Maid won't jumpstart the NE side on its own. Downtown will have to creep out to Minute Maid.

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  • 1 year later...

Pavillions, Fingers, more buildings, new businesses opening on street level...

We will probably hear more rumbles out Sakowitz since H. Pavilions dove in.

Downtown is the only area where light rail is completed, it will be interesting to see if construction has the same impact on those areas that it expands into as it did downtown and if that doesn't push business into downtown.

Any thoughts ?

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Pavillions, Fingers, more buildings, new businesses opening on street level...

We will probably hear more rumbles out Sakowitz since H. Pavilions dove in.

Downtown is the only area where light rail is completed, it will be interesting to see if construction has the same impact on those areas that it expands into as it did downtown and if that doesn't push business into downtown.

Any thoughts ?

Studies have shown that investments in rapid transit systems typically only cause significant and increased levels of private-sector investment in the Central Business District. Other areas tend to get a lot of government and non-profit offices relocating there, but don't get much investment unless forced by severe land use controls or major incentives programs. Atlanta is the case-in-point. I don't see why Houston should be any different.

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  • 4 weeks later...

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