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Subdude

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I went to Barnes and Nobiles yesterday and found a book called Cinema Houston! It has info on ALL houston Cinema's/Movie Houses EVEN Ashikaga's Santa Rosa, winkler drive in! It's a great book it was $50 though i found a few sites that have it. Most pictures and info is cited as "houston public library"

http://www.bestwebbuys.com/Cinema_Houston-...l?isrc=b-search

That is too cool. I've been looking for good, clear pictures of the Airline and I-45 drive-ins.

Thanks!!!

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That is too cool. I've been looking for good, clear pictures of the Airline and I-45 drive-ins.

Thanks!!!

I can only imagine what it would have been like had they left the Eastwood Theater alone. It was almost a replica of The Tower and wasn't even that old. Would have been very iconic to the area. I know a lady who's son was an usher there shortly before it was snuffed out. Grrr... and was just a grassy field for decades. Real *sigh*

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This book is excellent. I had the pleasure of meeting the author, David Welling, at his book signing back on Dec. 20th at Story Sloane's gallery. I highly recommend checking out a copy of this book, if you can get your hands on it, and I'm sure that some local places carry it - including, possibly, Story Sloane's gallery.

~ 320 pages, hard-bound

The Table of Contents goes something like this:

1 - Stage Origins

2 - The Nickelodeons

3 - Bigger and Better

4 - The Majestics

5 - The Main Three: The Metropolitan, the Kirby, and Loew's State

6 - The Later 1920s: You Ain't Heard Nothing Yet!

7 - Will Horwitz, Philanthropist

8 - The Neighborhood Theatre, 1934-1949

9 - Hoblitzelle's Interstate

10 - Jim Crow and the Ethnic Theatre

11 - The Fifties: The Incredible 3-D Wide-Screen Technicolor Stereophonic-Sound Ballyhoo Parade

12 - The Drive-in: A View from the Car Seat

13 - The Sixties: The Times, They Are A-Changin'

14 - The X-Houses

15 - From Multicinema to Multiplex: Safety in Numbers

16 - Let Them Eat Candy: The Concession Stand

17 - Beyond the Fringe: Midnight Movies and the Alternative Cinema

18 - Rediscovery in the Age of the Megaplex

19 - Perspectives: An Afterword

I can guarantee it is the most comprehensive source for the subject, as David Welling put a tremendous amount of work into this project. Well worth hunting down a copy.

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I think I mentioned this book in another thread recently. I have a reasonably substantial library of books related to theater history and motion picture technology, and this book is the last word on a subject that's not been well-documented in the past. Run, don't walk, to the bookstore and get it if you're even slightly interested in Houston's old theaters.

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I got it for Christmas and it is an absolutely lovely book. There is no old theatre that I know of that is not comprehensively covered. I second the enthusiastic recommendations. I actually was going to create a thread about this, but it fits here:

In the book, in the section devoted to the Village Theatre (which was an early Mackie and Kamrath, I had forgotten :( ) there is this intriguing passage:

After a period of sitting dormant, the property was acquired by Rice University. Plans were drawn up for a major reconstruction of the central Village shopping district, which would have required the demolition of the Village Theatre and neighboring buildings. Several preservation groups expressed a desire to save the cinema. Their concerns were politely rebuked...

(Jerry) Bryant's strategy was to seek $250,000 in corporate funding for the restoration process. The renovated theatre would host theatrical and musical performances, movies, civic affairs, and gatherings of Rice students. Rice and Weingarten were not receptive. To complicate matters, a city moratorium on the destruction of historic structures had been enacted by Mayor Lanier's administration a few years earlier. The theatre qualified for that protection because the Texas Historical Commission had declared it eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. Rice asked the state to remove the building from the list. That request was refused, so the university waited for the moratorium to run out. The moratorium expired on January 1, 1994. By January 15, the Village was gone.

--David Welling, "Cinema Houston," p. 167

Isn't that interesting? A city moratorium on the destruction of historic structures enacted by the Lanier administration? Rice University actively opposing preservation of an historic theatre?

Hmmm.

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there is this intriguing passage:
...a city moratorium on the destruction of historic structures had been enacted by Mayor Lanier's administration a few years earlier...Rice asked the state to remove the building from the list.

Isn't that interesting? A city moratorium on the destruction of historic structures enacted by the Lanier administration? Rice University actively opposing preservation of an historic theatre?

Hmmm.

Oh my, how somewhat recent memory fades! There must have been a small rift in the time space continuum to some other world

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This book is excellent. I had the pleasure of meeting the author, David Welling, at his book signing back on Dec. 20th at Story Sloane's gallery. I highly recommend checking out a copy of this book, if you can get your hands on it, and I'm sure that some local places carry it - including, possibly, Story Sloane's gallery.

~ 320 pages, hard-bound

The Table of Contents goes something like this:

1 - Stage Origins

2 - The Nickelodeons

3 - Bigger and Better

4 - The Majestics

5 - The Main Three: The Metropolitan, the Kirby, and Loew's State

6 - The Later 1920s: You Ain't Heard Nothing Yet!

7 - Will Horwitz, Philanthropist

8 - The Neighborhood Theatre, 1934-1949

9 - Hoblitzelle's Interstate

10 - Jim Crow and the Ethnic Theatre

11 - The Fifties: The Incredible 3-D Wide-Screen Technicolor Stereophonic-Sound Ballyhoo Parade

12 - The Drive-in: A View from the Car Seat

13 - The Sixties: The Times, They Are A-Changin'

14 - The X-Houses

15 - From Multicinema to Multiplex: Safety in Numbers

16 - Let Them Eat Candy: The Concession Stand

17 - Beyond the Fringe: Midnight Movies and the Alternative Cinema

18 - Rediscovery in the Age of the Megaplex

19 - Perspectives: An Afterword

I can guarantee it is the most comprehensive source for the subject, as David Welling put a tremendous amount of work into this project. Well worth hunting down a copy.

Can you scan and post things from it for us to see?

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that wouldn't be allowed, that could put Ed in some legal trouble. We're already cutting it close to posting portions of the Chron.com articles on here.

I didn't know the legal implications involved. On another thread, someone posted an item that I mentioned out of the Guiness Book of World Records about the Astroworld Hotel. That's why I thought that it might be OK.

Edited by northbeaumont
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I didn't know the legal implications involved. On another thread, someone posted an item that I mentioned out of the Guiness Book of World Records about the Astroworld Hotel. That's why I thought that it might be OK.

I'm not sure why the Chronicle gets so upset when some of their stuff is used on these boards. It's not like we're not going to buy their paper. They put it on their own web site for anyone to see free anyway. And it's not like we're claiming the work as our own... everyone always says "This is from the Houston Chronicle." Clear attribution.

Now a book is different. I can see why the publisher of a book wouldn't want excerpts posted... cause then people might not buy the book. There's only one book. But the paper is different each and every day - by definition. So even if somone posted all of yesterday's Chronicle on this site, it wouldn't harm today's sales.

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I'm not sure why the Chronicle gets so upset when some of their stuff is used on these boards. It's not like we're not going to buy their paper. They put it on their own web site for anyone to see free anyway. And it's not like we're claiming the work as our own... everyone always says "This is from the Houston Chronicle." Clear attribution.

Now a book is different. I can see why the publisher of a book wouldn't want excerpts posted... cause then people might not buy the book. There's only one book. But the paper is different each and every day - by definition. So even if somone posted all of yesterday's Chronicle on this site, it wouldn't harm today's sales.

Nevertheless they do get very antsy about it and have threatened HAIF before.

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I'm not sure why the Chronicle gets so upset when some of their stuff is used on these boards. It's not like we're not going to buy their paper.

I haven't bought a newspaper in over 10 years.

They put it on their own web site for anyone to see free anyway.

Where they sell ad space, and promise our eyeballs to advertisers.

Now a book is different. I can see why the publisher of a book wouldn't want excerpts posted... cause then people might not buy the book. There's only one book. But the paper is different each and every day - by definition. So even if somone posted all of yesterday's Chronicle on this site, it wouldn't harm today's sales.

Newspaper sales don't amount to diddly anymore. Advertising is where the money comes from (just like the HAIF).

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Nevertheless they do get very antsy about it and have threatened HAIF before.

The only thing I can think of is that I remember from a media law class I took in college that when it comes to copyrights and trademarks that if you aren't vigilant about enforcing it, you could lose potentially lose it, especially for trademarks.

But again, we aren't appropriating the Chronicle's name nor are we claiming the Chronicle's articles as our own. Everyone has always given then full attribution.

I contacted them once about using a few of their stories and images in an area history report I wrote. They allowed me to use them, provided I gave them attribution (which I was more than happy to do), the images could only be of a certain size, that the report would only be in pdf form, it could not be printed or placed on any website, and that it would go to no more than 100 people. All of these were very easy for me to comply with and placed no burden on me whatsoever as they all were what I was going to do anyway, but I was amazed they went into such detail.

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I haven't bought a newspaper in over 10 years.

Where they sell ad space, and promise our eyeballs to advertisers.

Newspaper sales don't amount to diddly anymore. Advertising is where the money comes from (just like the HAIF).

Yes, newspapers make most of their money from advertising. I don't think the Chronicle would stay in business very long if all they received was the 50 cents that a newspaper costs.

Years ago, to my surprise, I found out that fast food restaurants make their biggest profits from the sale of drinks, not food.

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Yes, newspapers make most of their money from advertising. I don't think the Chronicle would stay in business very long if all they received was the 50 cents that a newspaper costs.

Years ago, to my surprise, I found out that fast food restaurants make their biggest profits from the sale of drinks, not food.

Yep that why you pay up to 2.50 for a 20 oz... The markup on 20 oz pepsi is almost 1 buck. Whole sale is 65 cents a bottle. You buy it for 1.39

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  • 2 months later...

Says it was the "world's first"!

The Majestic Theater, designed by John Eberson and constructed downtown in 1923, is considered to be the most notable movie theatre built in the city.[48] The design was not of a standard theatre interior, but an outdoor plaza and garden of with a starlit sky overhead. The Mediterranean blue ceiling, inset with twinkling lights, featured clouds that floated over the heads of the audience during screenings. The Majestic was the world's first "atmospheric" movie theatre.[49]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Architecture_of_Houston

be sure to click on "atmospheric".

The new cinema book looks like it has a whole section on it. Wish I could have seen it. :mellow:

Edited by NenaE
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I remember the Majestic, Metropolitan and Loews very well....it was big deal to go "down town" and see a movie at one of these theaters.

My mom says the same thing - she moved to Houston in the early 50s from a town in deep East Texas that is tiny even today (blink once and you'll miss it while driving through). Those theaters would be quite impressive now, if they were still around; I can only imagine what they must've looked like in their heyday to someone who'd grown up in the country.

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  • 2 weeks later...
That's pretty cool--does it include drive-ins or just indoor?

One of my local public libraries had this book and I checked it out. Yes, one of the chapters is about drive-in theatres. I liked that aerial photo of the Post Oak taken in the early 1950s. It said that is where the Williams Tower is today. But there's one thing I read that I never knew before. It said that one of the things which led to the demise of DIs was when Daylight Savings Time started in 1967. I thought that we have always had DST. I read somewhere that DST was conceived by Benjamin Franklin as a joke.

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One of my local public libraries had this book and I checked it out. Yes, one of the chapters is about drive-in theatres. I liked that aerial photo of the Post Oak taken in the early 1950s. It said that is where the Williams Tower is today. But there's one thing I read that I never knew before. It said that one of the things which led to the demise of DIs was when Daylight Savings Time started in 1967. I thought that we have always had DST.

Daylight Savings Time was enacted during WWII but went away after the war. It came back in the late sixties as a way of saving energy. Politicians thought people would use less electricity for lights if there were more daylight hours.

Anyway, DST was one of the reasons drive-ins went away. With standard time, movies started at a reasonable hour, but with DST, it didn't get dark enough to start a movie until around 8:30pm. It totally messed with your evening timing. Nobody wanted to wait up that long to see a movie.

Rising land prices and film fees theater owners pay finally put the nail in the coffin for drive-ins. They just got too expensive to run. Land values went up and up, meaning property taxes also went up and up, and drive-ins finally threw in the towel in the 80s. There are still a few of them around, but very few.

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and the ever growing popularity of Television.

Major film studios tried everything to keep the Drive In & walk in theaters alive ie; 3-D process and other outrageous gimmick's. Most books on the subject describe in great detail.

I would like to add that violence was a major factor for closings. (Especially in Houston) I recall the 6 screen Drive-In theater in Greenspoint shut down after a mere, what was it 3-4 years? By early 80's it was the hot spot for serious gang wars. Oy vey!

Drive-In's would never work in today's environment, whole other topic. Imagine almost every person on their cell phones while watching the screen? Add Ipods and earth shaking boom box music. People simply do not respect each other any more. :(

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I would like to add that violence was a major factor for closings. (Especially in Houston) I recall the 6 screen Drive-In theater in Greenspoint shut down after a mere, what was it 3-4 years? By early 80's it was the hot spot for serious gang wars. Oy vey!

Not sure where you got your facts, but the I-45 Drive-In lasted for 10 years (1982-92) and closed because the area was being built up and the owner wanted to put a shopping center there. With a Wal-Mart being built next door in 1989 and the North Freeway being expanded in 1990, that was no longer a viable site for a drive-in, either from a viewing or economic perspective.

Here's two stories about the theatre's demise from the Chronicle, neither of which mention violence as the reason for closing:

http://www.chron.com/CDA/archives/archive....id=1992_1035533

http://www.chron.com/CDA/archives/archive....id=1992_1039552

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Did we forget the Houston Music Theatre in Sharpstown

I remember that place, if it is the same one that's called the Arena Theater now.Was built circular, in the round... Sits between two tall bldgs, on Hwy 59 So. Hard to believe, but when my family went there to see a play in the 60's, there was nothing but fields & chain link fences behind & around it. Right before Sharpstown.

Sevfiv, great pics. love the b/w ones especially. Thank goodness for Bob Bailey & those pics!

*I never heard much talk about the Bluebonnet growing up. Didn't last long, from what I've heard. The Broadway was popular, & the Santa Rosa (I think) might have hurt their business.

My dad liked to tell a story of reading an ad in the newspaper about a new spy movie playing at the Holmes Rd.? Drive-In, (later 610 Loop S) HUMM? Wonder what this is? It was "Dr. No". He loved the James Bond movies! The "original" ones, of course, with Sean Connery. :wub:

* Edit: I confused the Plaza with the Bluebonnet, as many do. See my post below for more info.

Edited by NenaE
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  • 4 months later...
Houston_Theater_Ads.jpg

Thanks Isuredid for posting these newspaper theater ad. listings, shows which movie theaters were in business at the same time, which could have been affiliated, and which ones were independently operated, at that particular time, of course.

I have found that people often confuse the East End/ SE End - Broadway street theaters.

The Bluebonnet was located at 1015 Broadway, one st. North of Lawndale (near Harrisburg).

The Broadway was located at 1325 Broadway, just South of Lawndale (near Harrisburg).

The Plaza is listed on the above ad as *3818 Broadway, near intersection of Broadway & Gulf Frwy. (I-45S) (in Park Place). It is listed under Independent Suburban Theaters, possibly why it did not survive very long with the competition. (Heard also, as mentioned in an above post, that it competed with the Broadway & Santa Rosa.) *Can anyone verify the Plaza address for me? it's blury in the ad.

Reason for edit: Plaza theater address verified by Gnu, see below post.

Bob Bailey collection, Bluebonnet Theater link: http://www.cah.utexas.edu/db/dmr/dmr_resul...ed&folder=5

Edited by NenaE
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Thanks Isuredid for posting these newspaper theater ad. listings, shows which movie theaters were in business at the same time, which could have been affiliated, and which ones were independently operated, at that particular time, of course.

I have found that people often confuse the East End/ SE End - Broadway street theaters.

The Bluebonnet was located at 1015 Broadway, one st. North of Lawndale (near Harrisburg).

The Broadway was located at 1325 Broadway, just South of Lawndale (near Harrisburg).

The Plaza is listed on the above ad as *3816? Broadway, near intersection of Broadway & Gulf Frwy. (I-45S) (in Park Place). It is listed under Independent Suburban Theaters, possibly why it did not survive very long with the competition. (Heard also, as mentioned in an above post, that it competed with the Broadway & Santa Rosa.) *Can anyone verify the Plaza address for me? it's blury in the ad.

My magnifying glass shows the address of the Plaza Theater was 1325 Broadway. Apparently the Broadway Theater was named the Plaza in an earlier life.

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The Plaza is listed on the above ad as *3816? Broadway, near intersection of Broadway & Gulf Frwy. (I-45S) (in Park Place). It is listed under Independent Suburban Theaters, possibly why it did not survive very long with the competition. (Heard also, as mentioned in an above post, that it competed with the Broadway & Santa Rosa.) *Can anyone verify the Plaza address for me? it's blury in the ad.

the former Plaza is still extant...

see my previous posting about the Plaza in the Alrey theater thread:

http://www.houstonarchitecture.info/haif/i...st&p=104433

Another theater that showed art films for a short time (in the late-forties), was the Plaza/Vogue Theater. It's the old theater near the circle at Broadway and 45 (which is currently a Pawn Shop) and opened in about 1941 as the Plaza Theater.

When the Santa Rosa opened nearby in 1947 (on Telephone Road), The Plaza, faced with the new competition from the Interstate-owned competitor, struggled and was eventually sold. The new owner renamed it the Vogue and started showing art films. The experiment did not last long and it soon reverted back to The Plaza. It only remained a theater until about 1951.

the current address of the pawn shop is 3818.

Edited by gnu
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the former Plaza is still extant...

see my previous posting about the Plaza in the Alrey theater thread:

http://www.houstonarchitecture.info/haif/i...st&p=104433

Another theater that showed art films for a short time (in the late-forties), was the Plaza/Vogue Theater. It's the old theater near the circle at Broadway and 45 (which is currently a Pawn Shop) and opened in about 1941 as the Plaza Theater.

When the Santa Rosa opened nearby in 1947 (on Telephone Road), The Plaza, faced with the new competition from the Interstate-owned competitor, struggled and was eventually sold. The new owner renamed it the Vogue and started showing art films. The experiment did not last long and it soon reverted back to The Plaza. It only remained a theater until about 1951.

the current address of the pawn shop is 3818.

Thanks Gnu, saw one of your references to the Plaza, in a previous thread, but it was the one with no address. When I did a search, I couldn't always access the exact post I needed, just gave me the Historic category, not the actual post, :angry2: .

So, they were all separate theaters, as I thought.

As a kid, that Plaza movie theater/ pawn shop was one of those many things that caught my eye, when passing by.

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Amazing to find that newspaper movie section. Remember this was one of the MAIN reasons we used to buy the newspaper was to see what was showing at local neighborhood theaters?

Even more amazing is that The Wayside Theater is listed! be sure to glance at the Bob Bailey pics of the Opening Ceremonies which included none other than Bob Hope as master of ceremonies?! What! :o:)

Its sad the entertainment industry was going thru so many new innovative changes that made these nabe theaters a short lived but very fun experience. (Still flipping out on The Wayside) pass by this spot now and well....best remember the way it was.

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Where was the Lindale Theater? Is the building still there?

BTW, that newspaper page is from 1942. "Orchestra Wives" was playing at the North Main, Wayside, and Delman Theaters. That's a great movie if you are a Glenn Miller fan, though the plot is a little corny.

The Lindale Theater was located at 5006 Fulton. Was opened in 1941, as an independent neighborhood theater, in it's early days it survived on B movies, later named the Al Ray. The building has been torn down. This info. was found in Cinema Houston by David Welling, p. 132. Also see Gnu's post link above, for more info.

Edited by NenaE
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The Lindale Theater was located at 5006 Fulton. Was opened in 1941, as an independent neighborhood theater, in it's early days it survived on B movies, later named the Al Ray. The building has been torn down. This info. was found in Cinema Houston by David Welling, p. 132. Also see Gnu's post link above, for more info.

Now you really have my curiousity going! :o

Could this 2006 Fulton be the very same location of what was once known as The Stardust Ballroom? Is this where Fulton curves and bends in front of Moody Park???

I was told that the old (now gone) Stardust was once a bowling alley but I also heard there was a theater next door? They said it was converted in the 50's?

This is real hardcore Houston history as far as I am concerned anyway.

The Stardust was finally swept away around 1989?

Maybe here is the question: What now stands at 2006 Fulton? Anyone? :D

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Now you really have my curiousity going! :o

Could this 2006 Fulton be the very same location of what was once known as The Stardust Ballroom? Is this where Fulton curves and bends in front of Moody Park???

I was told that the old (now gone) Stardust was once a bowling alley but I also heard there was a theater next door? They said it was converted in the 50's?

This is real hardcore Houston history as far as I am concerned anyway.

The Stardust was finally swept away around 1989?

Maybe here is the question: What now stands at 2006 Fulton? Anyone? :D

It's 5006 Fulton, not 2006. This is north of Moody Park - a few blocks north of the intersection of Fulton and Cavalcade.

5006 Fulton is now the site of the "Fulton Mansion" built a few years ago that's been discussed on HAIF previously.

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It's 5006 Fulton, not 2006. This is north of Moody Park - a few blocks north of the intersection of Fulton and Cavalcade.

5006 Fulton is now the site of the "Fulton Mansion" built a few years ago that's been discussed on HAIF previously.

Makes sense I guess. Perhaps that Lindale Theater was short lived as it seems the larger ones like The Granada were as close then came Northline Mall Cinema.

Northline's was somewhat decent in or around 1967-68 barely remember seeing Snow White & the 7 Dwarves there as a child (slept thru most of it I'm sure).

Now it would be remade as ...Chola White & the 7 Gangbangers. :lol:

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The Lindale Theater was located at 5006 Fulton. Was opened in 1941, as an independent neighborhood theater, in it's early days it survived on B movies, later named the Al Ray. The building has been torn down. This info. was found in Cinema Houston by David Welling, p. 132. Also see Gnu's post link above, for more info.

I remember going to the Al Ray in 1965 with my wife to be, in fact, on our first date. We saw "Zorba the Greek". In those days it showed foreign films and was one of the few place to see European films.

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I remember going to the Al Ray in 1965 with my wife to be, in fact, on our first date. We saw "Zorba the Greek". In those days it showed foreign films and was one of the few place to see European films.

Is it really true that names like Al Ray and Don Gordon were named after specific film actors?

Notice most of our theaters were either named after the neighborhoods or a person?

I still wonder about names like The Azteca but I do nto think it was named after the diversity of the area. I mean there were names of theaters in LA like The Egyptian and I am sure there were not a bunch of Egyptian's strolling around the hood. :)

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Theaters with names like "Azteca" and "The Egyptian" likely derived their names from the architecture of the buildings they were housed in. Exotic architectural styles like "Egyptian" or "Oriental" were very popular in the 1920s. Many proprietors felt that they were especially suited for the novel and fantasy-like atmosphere of a movie theater.

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Theaters with names like "Azteca" and "The Egyptian" likely derived their names from the architecture of the buildings they were housed in. Exotic architectural styles like "Egyptian" or "Oriental" were very popular in the 1920s. Many proprietors felt that they were especially suited for the novel and fantasy-like atmosphere of a movie theater.

There was also a worldwide fascination with anything Egyptian in the 1920's due to the discovery of King Tut's tomb.

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Is it really true that names like Al Ray and Don Gordon were named after specific film actors?

When I attended Jackson JHS and Austin SH back in the '50's, I recall hearing that the Don Gordon Theater was named after the owner's two sons. I vaguely remember that one of them - don't know which - was in the same grade as I was. Facts get less distinct with the passing of time...

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hearing that the Don Gordon Theater was named after the owner's two sons. I vaguely remember that one of them - don't know which - was in the same grade as I was. Facts get less distinct with the passing of time...

Correct, it was stated in a past theaters website, we always assumed it was named for a B actor named Don Gordon but that seemed unlikely especially if not a well known celeb.

I was somewhat fortunate to visit some of our last great movie palaces here in Houston as a child. We all have our distinct memories of them.

I remember the stage lights dimming and red velvet curtains slowly opening to the sides. Everyone hurrying to be seated while the ushers sat people down holding flashlights. The nice crushed swirling velvet carpetting. The theaters seemed cavernous too. The balcony was always a mystery as most times it was roped off with those neat red velvet roped off roles w/brass. There was always that space between the entry from the concessions that had port holes where you could stand tippy toe and see the film on the screen. By the mid to late 60's we kids only wanted to see giant monster films and they seemed as big as life on the big wide Cinemascope/Cinerama screens. The sound of Godzilla was as reall as can be. Even waiting outside under the flickering marquee lights was fun and you always got to see the posters of the upcoming films on the outside poster glass casings. Fun, fun days. :P

We thought those 1940/50's theaters were beautiful but mom always said they were nothing compared to the older ones in our very own downtown Houston! The Metropolitan/ Lowe's State, etc.

They were palaces.

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  • 4 months later...

Would anybody by chance have any information about a Sunset Theater on McGowen? This would have been from sometime in the 40's. A picture would be great.

I am not refering to the Sunset drive in, which seems to be the only result I can get for "Sunset theater".

Thanks,

Rhino

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Would anybody by chance have any information about a Sunset Theater on McGowen? This would have been from sometime in the 40's. A picture would be great.

I am not refering to the Sunset drive in, which seems to be the only result I can get for "Sunset theater".

Thanks,

Rhino

I went there many Saturdays, as a youngster in the early 40's, to see cowboy movies. Did take a date there in the early 50's. It was at McGowen and Chenevert. Built around 1940, if I remember correctly, by Albert Farb, father of Houston apartment developer, Harold Farb.

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  • 8 months later...

THE MAJESTIC AND THE METROPOLITAN THEATERS WERE LOCATED IN DOWNTOWN HOUSTON........THE SEATS WERE ON A SLANT FROM TOP TO BOTTOM AND THEY HAD A BALCONY....ALSO MINI BALCONIES BUT NO ONE SAT IN THOSE..........VERY OLD ARCHITECTURE BUT TORN TOWN FOR PARKING LOTS. LOWES, ALABAMA, FORGOT THE REST

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The church is a former movie theater. I remember passing by it on our way home from visiting family in that area. I was really little but I do remember around the mid to late 70s it being an X rated movie theater (didn't know what that meant then). I remember asking my dad if we could go see a movie there and he told me no because the movies there were dirty. First thing that came to mind was that there was probably alot of naked people in those movies. Which raised my curiosity even more...... smile.gif

The Avalon theater is gone as of 9-15-2009 Just a open lot of 1.5 Acr. for sale $1.5 mil

Racehorse East End To The End Milby class 1954

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