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W Hotel  

147 members have voted

  1. 1. What Development will Land the "W" in Houston?

    • BLVD Place
      48
    • Westcreek - Whatever it's called
      15
    • Highland Village
      17
    • Somewhere else
      31
    • Don't kid yourself. Houston can't support a "W"
      20
    • Downtown (Even though it would be financial suicide
      30


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Midtown would be a good option. It tends to be a youthful brand and midtown has no hotels. I think it would be the anchor to nightlife in the area and close enough to downtown to attract business travelers. W Dallas is outside the CBD and does well.

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Was kinda hoping nativehoustonian was sitting in first class on that Malaysian flight but then realized he only flies United BF.

Ritz is actively looking, possibly a couple others.

With business booming, the population exploding, and money flowing, I find it really hard to believe that someone hasn't taken a chance on a W Hotel, Mandarin Oriental, Ritz-Carlton, Taj, or Fairmont

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W Dallas is outside the CBD and does well.

The W in Dallas is in victory park, which is basically uptown.. The hottest sub market in Dallas by far... There's no comparison between that location and midtown. I agree with the other points you were saying about midtown, but I could think of a handful of other places it would be in before midtown..

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There is still so much potential in Midtown that there's no comparison to Uptown Dallas. I'm all for city planning, which Houston is finally beginning to initiate little by little. The problem is that Dallas over plans and over thinks every little thing they build that there is absolutely no organic development within their neighborhoods. I use to live about an hour away from Dallas a few years ago, and one thing I noticed is the culture is so drastically different between Htown and Dallas. Though both cities have some similarities, they are so different. One thing about Houston is we have such a natural style, we have a very big city feel. Nothing stereotypical Texas about Houston. Dallas has the more conventional, Texas stereotype, which they embrace. I won't lie though, Dallas is so lame, mainly because the people are so unoriginal and that translates in to how they build. 

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I am as quick to bash Dallas as the next person, but the above is a bit silly and kind of pointless. They have a slick modern W, and we can't even get one off the ground. That area of Dallas couldn't have been built at a worse time (ala Green Street), but with time it will become what it was planned for. Dallas has vision, and Dallas gets better architecture when it comes to residential and hotel towers. Austin really has the crown in that respect.

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One thing about Dallas - ground floor retail all over the place in Uptown.

Houston - still trying to split the atom.

 

and how much of that retail is sitting vacant or partially if not wholly subsidized by the office/residential/hotel component? i'll tell you - a bunch of it. dense ground floor retail makes urbanists pants bulge but it rarely makes economic sense. i've spoken to developer after developer and they all say the same thing - if they can subsidize it as an amenity to the major component of the development then they will consider it but by itself it is typically a money loser.

 

example: i was in austin a couple of weekends ago on 2nd street near the W eating dinner with some of my friends that live there. while the restaurants and bars typically do well i asked about the stores. they said many stores shutter or move within 9-12 months because rent is too high and there's absolutely NO PARKING. succesful pedestrian level retail requires a critical mass of residents and i'm sorry but that just doesn't exist in cities like Houston and Dallas and Austin.

 

btw W is still supposedly kicking tires for a houston location.

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and how much of that retail is sitting vacant or partially if not wholly subsidized by the office/residential/hotel component? i'll tell you - a bunch of it. dense ground floor retail makes urbanists pants bulge but it rarely makes economic sense. i've spoken to developer after developer and they all say the same thing - if they can subsidize it as an amenity to the major component of the development then they will consider it but by itself it is typically a money loser.

 

example: i was in austin a couple of weekends ago on 2nd street near the W eating dinner with some of my friends that live there. while the restaurants and bars typically do well i asked about the stores. they said many stores shutter or move within 9-12 months because rent is too high and there's absolutely NO PARKING. succesful pedestrian level retail requires a critical mass of residents and i'm sorry but that just doesn't exist in cities like Houston and Dallas and Austin.

 

btw W is still supposedly kicking tires for a houston location.

 

That's why I put the last two quotes in my signature - good reminders.

 

But good to know the success of GFretail vs. GFrestaurants.

 

It's also possibly a good argument for the city building more underground parking.

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  • 3 weeks later...

A little "W Hotel" talk today in HBJ today.

 

QUOTE: Branded residences, condos that are situated on top of premium hotels and use the hotels’ amenities such as those at the W Hotel in Austin, are doing well in Texas' metro markets, but have yet to call Houston home. It won’t be a trend for Houston, but will likely crop up in the near future in hot spots such as the Galleria area and downtown, Thomsen said. UNQUOTE

 

http://www.bizjourna...areas-will.html

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and how much of that retail is sitting vacant or partially if not wholly subsidized by the office/residential/hotel component? i'll tell you - a bunch of it. dense ground floor retail makes urbanists pants bulge but it rarely makes economic sense. i've spoken to developer after developer and they all say the same thing - if they can subsidize it as an amenity to the major component of the development then they will consider it but by itself it is typically a money loser.

example: i was in austin a couple of weekends ago on 2nd street near the W eating dinner with some of my friends that live there. while the restaurants and bars typically do well i asked about the stores. they said many stores shutter or move within 9-12 months because rent is too high and there's absolutely NO PARKING. succesful pedestrian level retail requires a critical mass of residents and i'm sorry but that just doesn't exist in cities like Houston and Dallas and Austin.

btw W is still supposedly kicking tires for a houston location.

What does this mean 'kicking tires'

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