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WesternGulf

Westheimer Tower

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TheNiche    961
:D thanks TheNiche. Boy you have been around. I would LOVE to go to the top of the former Enron Tower II. How were you able to do that? Is there an observation deck for the pubic, or do you have connections?

I'm in the industry. To my knowledge, there is no observation deck planned for 1500 Louisiana. You'd have to talk to Chevron about that.

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Triton    9,105
That's becuase it IS under construction.

Are you sure? :o

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TheNiche    961
I think you made a mistake, Editor. On the upcoming Houston projects you list Houston Cent re is under construction.

Houston City Centre is U/C at the old Town & Country site. Camden's City Center apartment project is also U/C.

The one on Main Street hasn't even gone public yet with its plans.

Edited by TheNiche

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tierwestah    7

No No No. Hold up!!!

Let's get back on the subject regarging the comment Ricco made. I want some answers.

Ricco, what do you mean it IS under construction

Edit: Nevermind, Niche answered the question in the above post. I let my excitement get away because i only had the proposed one downtown in mind. My bad.

Edited by tierwestah

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Jersey01    0
Although they have their obvious differences, the first thing that came to my mind was Calatrava's 80 South Street proposal for Lower Manhattan.

It reminded me of 80 South Street too.

I'm shocked that so many people here do not like this building and are bashing it!?! Architecture should be progressive, it should represent ideas and forward thinking. The Riparian and 2727 Kirby are nice, I do like them, but this building just makes a great statement. It's all a matter of taste. Most people love buildings like Montebello in Uptown, but I'm not fond of it.

The response that I am seeing in this project reminds me of The Richard Meier towers in the West Village of Manhattan. When it was being built, it was quite controversial. Now, people are starting similar projects all over Manhattan by the finest architects (I'm crazy about 40 Mercer by Jean Nouvel.) This building, if completed, could represent a major shift in what will come in this city that I, for one, would love to see. On the other hand, the response could be hated like that of Tremont Tower, though Tremont really is ugly.

Allen Bianchi has some really good work. I hope this project will be built, and if the prices aren't insane, I'll buy one. I like it that much.

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TheNiche    961
It reminded me of 80 South Street too.

I'm shocked that so many people here do not like this building and are bashing it!?! Architecture should be progressive, it should represent ideas and forward thinking. The Riparian and 2727 Kirby are nice, I do like them, but this building just makes a great statement. It's all a matter of taste. Most people love buildings like Montebello in Uptown, but I'm not fond of it.

The response that I am seeing in this project reminds me of The Richard Meier towers in the West Village of Manhattan. When it was being built, it was quite controversial. Now, people are starting similar projects all over Manhattan by the finest architects (I'm crazy about 40 Mercer by Jean Nouvel.) This building, if completed, could represent a major shift in what will come in this city that I, for one, would love to see. On the other hand, the response could be hated like that of Tremont Tower, though Tremont really is ugly.

Allen Bianchi has some really good work. I hope this project will be built, and if the prices aren't insane, I'll buy one. I like it that much.

Who's bashing it? It seems that a lot of us really like the aesthetic. But the truth is that highrises aren't built so that passers-by can oogle them, only so that units can sell. And in Houston, which does not have a mature highrise market on account of other housing options being so affordable, developers have to be generalists when it comes to design; they must appeal to the broadest market possible because that market is so small. Designs that are too avant garde carry a high risk because a large segment of the market just won't 'get it' and even those prospective buyers that do 'get it' will still weigh their options with competing buildings (such as those that have balconies).

I'm just saying that it is riskier from a financial and marketing perspective. That's all.

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Jersey01    0
Who's bashing it? It seems that a lot of us really like the aesthetic. But the truth is that highrises aren't built so that passers-by can oogle them, only so that units can sell. And in Houston, which does not have a mature highrise market on account of other housing options being so affordable, developers have to be generalists when it comes to design; they must appeal to the broadest market possible because that market is so small. Designs that are too avant garde carry a high risk because a large segment of the market just won't 'get it' and even those prospective buyers that do 'get it' will still weigh their options with competing buildings (such as those that have balconies).

I'm just saying that it is riskier from a financial and marketing perspective. That's all.

A couple of people did bash it. "Horrid" was the word used. Horrid seems like an emotional word, hence my calling it bashing.

I completely agree that developers ultimately want a building to sell more than they want it to be beautiful. You are right. But the reality is that the exterior of a huge building in a neighborhood ultimately impacts those neighbors and passers-by and effects more people than the amount that inhabit it. Because of this, it thrills me that developers and architects in Houston are starting to consider the impact of design and how successful it has been in other large cities. I do agree with you that designs that are too avant garde risk success in sales, but sometimes all it takes is one or two examples of success and others will follow. Randall Davis decided to convert old warehouses into moderately expensive apartments, sometimes only containg one room and a bathroom. This was hardly normal in Houston, but now it is. You can get a loft (such a loosely used term now) in nearly any part of the Houston, and they get a premium over standard condos and apartments.

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Mister X    207
A couple of people did bash it. "Horrid" was the word used. Horrid seems like an emotional word, hence my calling it bashing.

That's true, but I bet for every one person that doesn't like this building there are 10 who do like it. I think it's awesome, but it probably would work better as an office building. I would want a balcony if I were going to live in a highrise.

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nmainguy    4
I completely agree that developers ultimately want a building to sell more than they want it to be beautiful. You are right. But the reality is that the exterior of a huge building in a neighborhood ultimately impacts those neighbors and passers-by and effects more people than the amount that inhabit it. Because of this, it thrills me that developers and architects in Houston are starting to consider the impact of design and how successful it has been in other large cities. I do agree with you that designs that are too avant garde risk success in sales, but sometimes all it takes is one or two examples of success and others will follow. Randall Davis decided to convert old warehouses into moderately expensive apartments, sometimes only containg one room and a bathroom. This was hardly normal in Houston, but now it is. You can get a loft (such a loosely used term now) in nearly any part of the Houston, and they get a premium over standard condos and apartments.

Some developers are flippers. That's great as far as it goes. Some want lasting beauty, economy and utility-which ultimatly reaps greater rewards. Some love One Houston Center for it's bulk and mass. It's long term return has been less than Two Houston because more companies prefer the quality and utility of Two with it's elegant entrance, quality use of materials in it's public spaces and span as opposed to One's street level some-times revolving doors. That's a great side-by-side comparison. Some are driven to excellence. They know the long term benefits. Others settle for the mundane and reap the rewards of their low expectations. It's really no different than residential real estate: If you offer a quality property you get quality buyers/renters. If you offer up crap then you get crap and who wants to visit crap?

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Jersey01    0
That's true, but I bet for every one person that doesn't like this building there are 10 who do like it. I think it's awesome, but it probably would work better as an office building. I would want a balcony if I were going to live in a highrise.

Hopefully 9 out of 10 would like it. The scheme is so preliminary that it is possible that there could be balconies, but they may compromise the composition. One of my favorite residential hi rises has electrically sliding glass panels built into the walls so that the room may act as a balcony. But it costs a pretty penny for that feature. I'd prefer some balconies as well, but I guess some of the other hi rises around town without them have been successful. As for the office vs. residential, if it is built in the proposed area, I'd love to see this building be mixed use. Maybe the first couple of floors could be galleries, restaurants, shops, or offices.

Edited by Jersey01

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Anyone have any other info on this potential project? The only info I can find is on the link:

westheimeruo0.png

Looks kinda like those new hideous aluminum sided 'lofts' that are sprouting up all over Houston.

Houston City Centre is U/C at the old Town & Country site. Camden's City Center apartment project is also U/C.

The one on Main Street hasn't even gone public yet with its plans.

Off topic, but I didn't find out until recently that Camden is a Houston based, publicly traded company.

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TxDave    20

I posted the same comments in another thread, but I would love to see this building in a more established/prominent location...

That tower is fascinating and will be a great addition to Houston's collection of significant buildings.

However, I think the parcel on Westheimer is an odd location for any high rise, let alone such a prominent building.

I hope the developer does decide to relocate this one to somewhere in Midtown, Uptown, or the Museum/Medical District.

I think it would compliment/elevate any of those neighborhoods without appearing to be an "odd man out"

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musicman    178
I hope the developer does decide to relocate this one to somewhere in Midtown, Uptown, or the Museum/Medical District.

I think it would compliment/elevate any of those neighborhoods without appearing to be an "odd man out"

i think it would be an "odd man out" in midtown and the museum district too. i still think it would fit well in greenway.

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i think it would be an "odd man out" in midtown and the museum district too. i still think it would fit well in greenway.

Greenway just might be a logical place for it, but I could see it (even though I am not wild about the design) in the Galleria area.

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Jersey01    0
i think it would be an "odd man out" in midtown and the museum district too. i still think it would fit well in greenway.

I know I like the convenience of the proposed location, but it would stick out there for sure. Then again, that didn't stop the developers of The Royalton or The Huntingdon.

This may seem like an odd location, but I think that it would be neat on Sterrett Street or Richey Street in northernmost downtown. I've always liked this tiny little area, it's like Houston's own microscopic SoHo or Meatpacking District. It would be nice with the Hardy Railyard Project nearby as well as downtown conveniences.

Edited by Jersey01

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bachanon    400

i think the galleria or allen parkway/memorial drive would be a more appropriate place for this building. near herman park or along almeda near mosaic would be better as well. i do not like the proposed location.

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TheNiche    961
Some developers are flippers. That's great as far as it goes. Some want lasting beauty, economy and utility-which ultimatly reaps greater rewards. Some love One Houston Center for it's bulk and mass. It's long term return has been less than Two Houston because more companies prefer the quality and utility of Two with it's elegant entrance, quality use of materials in it's public spaces and span as opposed to One's street level some-times revolving doors. That's a great side-by-side comparison. Some are driven to excellence. They know the long term benefits. Others settle for the mundane and reap the rewards of their low expectations. It's really no different than residential real estate: If you offer a quality property you get quality buyers/renters. If you offer up crap then you get crap and who wants to visit crap?

Weak analogy. A trophy office skyscraper in a Central Business District is not in any way and will never be comparable to a for-sale residential condominium building outside of any business district. And your conclusion is frequently false; most condo buyers are not at all familiar with construction methods, have no reliable way of forecasting energy use, and are not well-versed in the finer points of architecture. Moreover, the relatively small scale of a condo purchase typically does not warrant exhaustive investigation of these matters, whereas a large office tenant taking full floors at a time of a building probably will (or at least should) have professionals advising them every step of the way.

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ricco67    382

Anyone have any information on this, or do y'all think this is a dead project/rumor?

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lockmat    1,965

I personally just think it's a rumor, FWIW.

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infinite_jim    926

Am i the only one who thinks that rendering looks like some 1st year student's work?

not against modernism, but this looks like a heavy handed attempt for commercial recognition, err branding..

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Subdude    1,308
Am i the only one who thinks that rendering looks like some 1st year student's work?

not against modernism, but this looks like a heavy handed attempt for commercial recognition, err branding..

I thought the idea was quite cool looking. Certainly a step up from the Mercer.

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