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Houston19514

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Posts posted by Houston19514

  1. Just now, shasta said:

    I agree..it gets frustrating because we are one of the WEALTHIEST cities on planet Earth yet our developments continue to get VE'd compared to other cities which seem to build these grand districts/buildings.

    We are literally one of the richest cities in the World:

    https://www.henleyglobal.com/publications/wealthiest-cities-2024

     

    What you are missing is that projects get VE'd, delayed and canceled in other cities as well.  I presume you are not seeing it because you don't follow other cities as closely.

  2. 14 hours ago, editor said:

    From this line in the thread:

    It seems to me like someone is building a garage for the church, not the church building a garage for themselves.

    It actually seems pretty clear that is  not the case.  Crane had said at one time he was talking to the church/school about doing a joint deal, but from the looks of the filing posted above and comments on this thread (including a later comment by the same poster you quoted here), that apparently did not work out.  The church/school are building their own parking garage .

  3. 40 minutes ago, hindesky said:

    The church and Incarnate Word own the property, Jim Crane does not own it.

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    Jim Crane's affiliated company owns the block across Avenida De Las Americas.

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    Yes, and as far as I can tell (and according to the filing posted above), the church and the school are building the parking garage. 

  4. Just now, editor said:

    Does "spending" exist in this context?

    When a church I used to attend let a developer turn its parking lot into a residential skyscraper over a church parking garage, it didn't "spend" anything.  In fact, it makes money each year from the lease of the land to the developer, which built and owns the building.  That seems to be what's happening here, too.

    How so?  It seems the church and school are building this parking garage for themselves.

  5. 15 minutes ago, editor said:

    You seem to be under the impression that the archdiocese is not part of Houston.

    Also, while I'm not privvy to any of the arrangements made, generally speaking such a deal would be between the church and the developer, with the archdiocese serving only a distant advisory role.  In the Catholic Church, the parishes are organizationally separated from the Church as a whole.  

    It's the reason that when the roof of the church I belonged to burned, the parish had to foot the bill for its reconstruction (and then it burned again), and the archdiocese wouldn't even lend us money.  It's also  one of the reasons that it was so hard for so long for people to sue the Church (big C) over sexual abuse that happened in a church (little c) or parish.  

    Parishes need the permission of the Ordinary and his finance council to spend funds over a certain amount, which usually means that the purchase and sale of buildings would require the Ordinary’s permission (c. 1291). This requirement is meant to protect parishes from their pastor spending large amounts of parish funds without any check or oversight.

    https://ordinariate.net/parish-property-ownership

    • Thanks 1
  6. Following up on the prior post, county population estimates also came out:

    Harris County:

    • 2020:  4,734,792
    • 2021: 4,735,517
    • 2022: 4,781,337
    • 2023: 4,835,125. (+53,788)

    Austin County:

    • 2020: 30,132
    • 2021: 30,431
    • 2022: 31,070
    • 2023: 31,677 (+607)

    Brazoria County:

    • 2020: 373,493
    • 2021: 379,121
    • 2022: 388,234
    • 2023: 398,938 (+10,704)

    Chambers County:

    • 2020: 47,019
    • 2021: 48,727
    • 2022: 51,309
    • 2023: 53,876 (+2,567)

    Fort Bend County:

    • 2020: 829,109
    • 2021: 860,305
    • 2022: 888,919
    • 2023: 916,778 (+27,859)

    Galveston County:

    • 2020: 351,590
    • 2021: 355,560
    • 2022: 357,387
    • 2023: 361,744 (+4,357)

    Liberty County:

    • 2020: 92,479
    • 2021: 97,488
    • 2022: 102,462
    • 2023: 108,272 (+5,810)

    Montgomery County

    • 2020: 625,291
    • 2021: 650,755
    • 2022: 679,554
    • 2023: 711,354 (+31,800)

    Waller County:

    • 2020: 57,285
    • 2021: 59,419
    • 2022: 61,852
    • 2023: 63,553 (+1,701)

    Walker County:

    • 2020: 76,553
    • 2021: 78,348
    • 2022: 79,678
    • 2023: 81,268 (+1,590)

    Matagorda County:

    • 2020: 36,287
    • 2021: 36,339
    • 2022: 36,122
    • 2023: 36,359 (+237)

    Washington County:

    • 2020: 35,804
    • 2021: 35,947
    • 2022: 36,368
    • 2023: 37,007 (+639)

    Wharton County:

    • 2020: 41,564
    • 2021: 41,652
    • 2022: 41,740
    • 2023: 41,739 (-1)
    • Like 1
  7. City Population estimates for 2023 were recently released.  Here's some info I find interesting

    HOUSTON:  (#4)  

    • 2020:  2,299,269
    • 2021:  2,291,020
    • 2022: 2,302,488
    • 2023: 2,314,157  +11,669 (+0.5%)

    New York City:  (#1)

    • 2020: 2,314,157
    • 2021: 8,462,216
    • 2022: 8,335,798
    • 2023: 8,258,035. -77,763 (-0.9%)

    Los Angeles:  (#2)

    • 2020: 3,895,848
    • 2021: 3,832,573
    • 2022: 3,832,573
    • 2023: 3,820,914  -1,868. (- %)

    Chicago:  (#3)

    • 2020: 2,743,329
    • 2021: 2,704,101
    • 2022: 2,672,660
    • 2023: 2,664,452 -8,208. (-0.3%)

    San Antonio:  (#7)

    • 2020: 1,439,257
    • 2021: 1,454,003
    • 2022: 1,473,325
    • 2023:1,495,295. +21,970. (+1.5%)

    Dallas:  (#9)

    • 2020: 1,303,212
    • 2021: 1,289,705
    • 2022: 1,297,358
    • 2023: 1,302,868 +5,510. (+0.4%)

    Austin:  (#11)

    • 2020: 965,827
    • 2021: 969,608
    • 2022: 975,418
    • 2023: 979,882  +4,464 (+0.5)

    Fort Worth (#12)

    • 2020: 923,602
    • 2021: 937,590
    • 2022: 957,103
    • 2023: 978,468. +21,365. (+2.2%)

    Fulshear:  42,616 (+26.6%, +9,110) (Second-fastest-growing city in the US)

    Conroe:  108,248 (+6.6%, +6,689)

    Katy:  26,360 (+4.2%, +1,074)

    Texas City:  56,609 (+928, +1.7%)

    Alvin:  28,633 (+424, +1.5%)

    Huntsville:  48,552 (+689, +1.4%)

    La Porte:  36,991 (+411, +1.1%)

    Rosenbergy:  41,104 (+41,104, +1.1%)

    College Station:  125,192 (+912, +0.7%)

    League City:  116,320 (+841, +0.7%)

    Victoria:  65,800 (+433, +0.7%)

    Pearland:  127,736 (+675, +0.5%)

    Dickinson:  21,834 (+82, +0.4%)

    Lake Jackson:  27,768 (+98, +0.4%)

    Missouri City:  76,773 (+259, +0.3%)

    Friendswood:  40,826 (+98, +0.2%)

    Galveston:  53,237 (+106, +0.2%)

    Baytown:  84,067 (-303, -0.4%)

    Pasadena:  146,716 (-991, -0.7%)

    Sugar Land: 108,515 (-899, -0.8%)

    Deer Park: 33,176 (-293, -0.9%)

     

  8. 3 hours ago, editor said:

    We almost had it.  A quarter century ago, it was called the Trans Texas Corridor.  Superhighways linking the major cities of Texas with rail, pipelines, and fiber optic conduits down the center.

    It was supported by both Republican and Democratic politicians, but was killed by people who make their money from ever-sprawling suburbs and exurbs and turning what's left of Texas into cul-de-sacs and strip malls.  

     

    2 hours ago, august948 said:

    That take differs a little from the take on wikipedia for the TTC.  No mention of cul-de-sacs and strip malls but lots about environmental and private property issues.  And about being opposed by both parties.

    Seems a bit incongruent that suburban developers would oppose a new highway.

     

     

    Yeah, that was a bit of historical revisionism.  The TTC concept (proposed by Governor Rick Perry) was pretty much still-born because of concerns over property-takings related to the very wide rights-of-way that would have been required

    • Like 1
  9. From Axios, regarding Finner’s resignation:  

    • The move came after an email surfaced showing he was aware officers were dropping investigations due to a "lack of personnel" years before he claimed to have found out.
    • Like 1
  10. FWIW, from what I know, I don't agree with the Mayor's pending moves regarding the Shepherd/Durham pair.  But no minds will be changed by engaging in hyperbole and hate.

    Also, with regard to Metro and the University Line (and other BRT projects), it is indeed hyperbole to say they have been canceled. They are still shown on Metro's website as part of their plans.

  11. 37 minutes ago, Triton said:

    Time will tell whether this is hyperbole or not. So far, the pictures not too bright. 

    We don't need time to tell us that it is hyperbole to claim that he has completely reversed multiple projects that are nearing completion.  AFAIK, that description only applies to one project (the Houston Ave re-do).

  12. Millions of Dollars had been spent on the planing and design for the Astrodome work and construction was scheduled to begin only a couple months after Hidalgo canceled it (work was scheduled to start right after that year's Rodeo).

    According to reports at the time, Turner "tore up 5 contracts" for Bush Airport's International Terminal Expansion project, after "Phase 1" of the project (the construction of new Terminal C North to prepare for the replacement of old C North) had already started.

  13. 38 minutes ago, Kinglyam said:

    Can you provide some indications of such projects halted by previous administrations? Particularly those that put millions of Federal dollars at risk?

    I've been in Houston since Brown, and I don't recall White, Parker, or Turner halting projects of the previous administration while they "reassess" them. Much less take a sledgehammer to them right out of the gate like Whitmire has some, like the Houston Avenue median project. There was no "reassessment" there. It was ripped up within about a month of his inauguration.

    IIRC, Mayor Turner halted the Bush Airport international terminal expansion plan in its tracks shortly after taking office.

    • Like 1
  14. 37 minutes ago, s3mh said:

    What did he say during his interview that I got wrong?  And more importantly, what did he say in his interview that justifies sending a completely approved and funded project back to the drawing board, possibly jeopardizing federal funding and causes unnecessary delays.  The Shep corridor will be three lanes from Memorial to I-10 and from 15th to 610.  How is carving a 1.3 mile segment for four lanes out of 3.5 miles going to help traffic?  And giving up on the pedestrian improvements right smack in the middle of the corridor basically wastes all the money spent improving the bookends as you lose connectivity.  This is just a flex by the mayor to show the libs who is who.  This right out of the play book of the likes of Rep. Culberson and Gov. Abbott who just can't stand it when a local government wants to do something other than build more lanes.

    I just think it’s important for people to be able to listen to his actual words, in context. Hence I provided the link.

    • Like 1
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