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Simbha

Is Downtown Houston the world's largest 'building'?

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Here's a question I've been pondering for a while...

Houston doesn't have any single buildings that contend for largest-building status (as measured by square footage). But, if a 'building' is defined as connected internal floorspace, would the collective buildings in downtown Houston - bound by the tunnel system (and skywalks) - be one of the largest buildings in the world?

I don't have square footage stats on all the DT buildings, so I can't answer this question myself... And, I also don't have any good info on how other cities might compare.

Anyone?

(Edit) Addendum: According to Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_largest_buildings_in_the_world), at least one building on the list - the Warren G. Magnuson Health Sciences Building in Seattle - actually consists of several interconnected wings.

Oh, and sewage lines don't count IMO, as they're not meant to be walked normally.

Edited by Simbha

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Interesting. I think Danax had mentioned this at one point too. Anyone know if this would indeed be eligible for consideration as one large building?

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If Embarcadero Center gets to be counted as one building, then Houston Center should be too. That's my position is that frankly, this list needs better quality control.

If you start considering entire districts on the basis of tunnels or skywalks, then downtown and the TMC probably would make a good show, as would downtown Minneapolis. Not sure about how we might stack up against international cities, though.

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If Embarcadero Center gets to be counted as one building, then Houston Center should be too. That's my position is that frankly, this list needs better quality control.

If you start considering entire districts on the basis of tunnels or skywalks, then downtown and the TMC probably would make a good show, as would downtown Minneapolis. Not sure about how we might stack up against international cities, though.

Probably not well. Some of the subway stations I've seen in Tokyo, Hong Kong, and Singapore connect to 20 or 30 different skyscrapers, and then have sky bridges that go beyond.

Also, Chicago has a pedestrian tunnel system like Houston's called the Pedway. I'm not sure which is larger linearly, but Chicago's buildings in general are taller than Houston's.

FWIW, New York has multiple non-subway tunnel systems, as well. Cincinnati has a skywalk system similar to Minneapolis.

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Probably not well. Some of the subway stations I've seen in Tokyo, Hong Kong, and Singapore connect to 20 or 30 different skyscrapers, and then have sky bridges that go beyond.

Also, Chicago has a pedestrian tunnel system like Houston's called the Pedway. I'm not sure which is larger linearly, but Chicago's buildings in general are taller than Houston's.

FWIW, New York has multiple non-subway tunnel systems, as well. Cincinnati has a skywalk system similar to Minneapolis.

According to the all-knowing Wikipedia (no idea if these figures are correct)...

The Houston Tunnel System links '95 full-city blocks' (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Houston_tunnel_system)

The Chicago Pedway connects 'more than 40 city blocks' (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicago_Pedway)

No idea how a 'full-city block' in H-town compares to a 'city block' in Chi-town.

Here are some others:

Minneapolis Skyway System: 69 full city blocks (11km) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minneapolis_Skyway_System) ... although the article on Skyways (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skyway) lists Minneapolis as having 13km of walkways.

Calgary's Skyway System: 16km

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Why stop at tunnels...go all out and count sanitary sewers too! They link tens of thousands of buildings in Houston!

The 69th Street plant services 53,500 acres of development in Houston -- that's one giant interconnected web of, uhhh... :wacko:

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Why stop at tunnels...go all out and count sanitary sewers too! They link tens of thousands of buildings in Houston!

The 69th Street plant services 53,500 acres of development in Houston -- that's one giant interconnected web of, uhhh... :wacko:

Build a Chipotle accessible only by sewer line, and I'll consider it. tongue.gif

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