Willowisp

Parade Of Homes Addresses?

11 posts in this topic

I found this info on another thread by SpaceAge and was wondering if a new thread could be started to list the actual addresses of any of these homes, especially of course, the moderns. I'm planning to be out and about looking for the best ones and taking pics. Glenbrook Valley is covered by RPS... I will mostly concern myself with Westbury and Meyerland, as that will be my immediate neighborhood. Maybe I will make it out to the library as was suggested in the other post.

These are the locations of the Parade of Homes houses for the first ten years:

1952 Edgewood- 32 houses

1953 Oak Forest- 30 houses

1954 City Wide- 32 houses

1955 Meyerland- 30 houses on Jackwood St.

1956 Glenbrook Valley- 30 houses

1957 Briarmeadow- 26 houses

1958 Sharpstown- 32 houses

1959 Westbury- 35 houses

1960 Walnut Bend- 31 houses on Olimpia

1961 Briargrove Park- 29 houses on Briarpark & Burgoyne

Thanks for the info!

Jason

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I know of course the ones listed on the brochure for '56, and the 6 on Glenview that were part of the '54. 1955 was on Jackwood street, but I don't know the addresses other than that one that is in the architectural guide. The one in Walnut bend was on Olympia I think.

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I went to the library as was suggested in the post I got these addresses from, and I found myself a victim of my own age. I had no idea the Houston Chronicle wasn't indexed or anything. I got out the old microfilm and sat for about 30 minutes looking at June, 1955. I think I got through about a week before I gave up. It was fascinating looking at the old newspaper, but I bored quickly! I went and found "Modernism Reborn" and checked it out. Great Book!

So, going back in time to the days before computers and newspaper indexes proved to be too much homework for me. I have more fun just driving the streets of the neighborhoods.

If I do find addresses, I'll post them.

Jason

I know of course the ones listed on the brochure for '56, and the 6 on Glenview that were part of the '54.  1955 was on Jackwood street, but I don't know the addresses other than that one that is in the architectural guide.  The one in Walnut bend was on Olympia I think.

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Willowisp - one thing that will make your searches easier is to check the Sunday sections... you can look at the classifieds (you'll see ads if the Parade of Homes was taking place) as well as the real estate section. Looking at other days of the week can prove frustrating and time consuming.

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Hi there - I've just registerd so that I can pass along some info to your group....I was researching "Parade of Homes" and discovered your site!

You all seem like a fun group!

The Scoop: There's about to be a Parade of Homes house on Olympia (1960) listed as a forclosure! :D

It's an amazing house - Kids in the neighborhood have called it "The Pointy House", and "The Lutheran Church" in the past....

The floorplan is very different! There are little courtyards off each bedroom, there's an indoor planter, a passthrough fireplace....it's just a "Mid Century" jewel.

(Sorry I put that last term in quotes - I find it a little comical....because, I suppose.....I'm mid century!)

I thought I should pass this along because you all may know of interested people - It would be a shame to see someone tear it down to build a McMansion! So pass along the info, watch har.com, and hopefully someone will want to put their sweat equity into a piece of Houston's history.

Thanks!

.

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Hi there - I've just registerd so that I can pass along some info to your group....I was researching "Parade of Homes" and discovered your site!

You all seem like a fun group!

The Scoop: There's about to be a Parade of Homes house on Olympia (1960) listed as a forclosure! :D

It's an amazing house - Kids in the neighborhood have called it "The Pointy House", and "The Lutheran Church" in the past....

The floorplan is very different! There are little courtyards off each bedroom, there's an indoor planter, a passthrough fireplace....it's just a "Mid Century" jewel.

(Sorry I put that last term in quotes - I find it a little comical....because, I suppose.....I'm mid century!)

I thought I should pass this along because you all may know of interested people - It would be a shame to see someone tear it down to build a McMansion! So pass along the info, watch har.com, and hopefully someone will want to put their sweat equity into a piece of Houston's history.

Thanks!

.

This one? http://search.har.com/engine/dispSearch.cf...mp;backButton=Y

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Welcome, Dee Ann! Here's a great site with the Glenbrook Valley homes, WITH ADDRESSES!: Parade of Homes - Glenbrook Valley

I have been using Google Maps to navigate street views of the mid-century Parade of Homes...taking a virtual drive down the streets! Beware, this is very addicting. I've spent too many late nights having fun like this. Unfortunately, not all streets are accessible with Google Maps on street level. For example, the 7900 block of Glenview cannot be viewed from street level. 7919 Glenview (magnificent!) was one of 6 original homes built 1954 included on that year

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10602 and 10607 olympia we're both in the 1960 parade. Unfortunately, and it breaks my heart, 10607 went into foreclosure, needed repairs and the integrity of the architectural detail was of no importance to those who "put the house back together." It was an amazing home. I had the opportunity to look at the house when it was in foreclosure in the early 90s. In the front yard there was a small water feature with a bridge leading over it to the front door. The water in the "pond" ran from the the outdoors to the indoors under a huge wall of glass. It was stunning. The front door was stunning too. Later that day after experiencing the home, I was telling my mother about it. I described some of the architecture and after rattling some of details off, she started telling me about the house. It turns out my father worked on that house and the one at 10602. He had been deceased for about 20 years at the time or I would have asked about the house. My father was an architect but i don't believe he was the main architect on those homes. I'm not really sure how that works. 

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Hello Alley. What is your fathers name?  Do you have any of his archive?

I toured both 10602 and 10607 Olympia in late '93 or early '94 when they were for sale. At that point, there was no information about them other than they were model homes.  On 10607, the front door was a translucent plastic/fiberglass exactly like the one at our Mod of the Month on Boros Drive in Hunters Creek last year. There is another door like this in Braeburn Valley at a house by Maggie Plumb. 10607 was unique and still original and in good condition in 1994. It did not need to be put back together.  Evidently the new owner did not understand/appreciate it and covered over much of the original details and added others.  Do you remember the kitchen? It was covered in black lava rock and seemed like a cave.  The kitchen was a small room at the rear of the house with a door that opened to the narrow strip of space behind the house. This house has two front yards, one in the normal place and another behind a wall along the building setback line. There is no back yard, only a utility easement behind the house. 

 

I have some newspaper copies about the 1960 Parade but very few stories that year mention the architect's names.  The promotion for 10607 Olympia says the builder was W. L. Kilgore, JR. and the caption under the photo says SPANISH-CONTEMPORARY DESIGN EXCITEMENT...A waterfall in the living room of this 4-bedroom, 4-bath all electric  two-story home...all masonry and glass. W L Kilgore, 4116 Dennis Street. 

 

10602 Olympia was by Dick Coneway's Harmony Homes.  Coneway was trained as an architect, according to Lars Bang who worked some with him but not on this house. The exterior is described as functional of new Miami Stone in a sandalwood coffee color. The east courtyard walls were originally diagonal in keeping with the floor plan but have been changed about ten years ago to align with the street. Part of the original promotion was that no flat walls face the streets

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About five years ago, someone in Sharpstown claimed that John Glenn once lived in the neighborhood. (not true). But having heard the stories about the astronauts and the 1962 Parade of Homes, I decided to find out what really happened and posted my findings on my web site.

 

You can find out the full story here

 

http://houstonfreeways.com/Home/Sharpstown_History

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