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tierwestah

Why doesn't Galveston take better care of their beaches?

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I always knew that HAIF was addictive...but I did not realize that it was a gateway drug until now. :unsure:

It all depends on WHICH gateway you want to go through. Now, it is time to choose....

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Edited by TJones

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I check the Galveston webcams daily. Doesn't look like a bad place to me and apparently has great appeal to the developers. I have "The Spot" webcams on my daily journal so everyone can see the fun place known as "Galveston".

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What I think will finally make a difference, as far as CLEAN beaches, will be the passing of the gambling bill. It will bring Bukoos of money into town for them, and once the city council gets a few letters and suggestion box cards about "why can't you guys comb your beaches ?" They will hop-to on it. I will bide my time.

Edited by TJones

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What I think will finally make a difference, as far as CLEAN beaches, will be the passing of the gambling bill. It will bring Bukoos of money into town for them, and once the city council gets a few letters and suggestion box cards about "why can't you guys comb the your beaches ?" They will hop-to on it. I will bide my time.

Looks like gambling won't happen..The bills were defeated as announced in the Galveston Daily News last Sunday:

Lawmakers know when to fold on gambling

By Mark Collette

The Daily News Published June 3, 2007

It wasn't exactly a roll of the dice.

When State Sen. Rodney Ellis sat down for a two-hour subcommittee hearing on his gambling bills, he knew no one was taking bets. The bills had no chance. They never even went to the full State Affairs Committee for a hearing.

Yet there are signs that, two to four years from now, things could change.

Bills that would have given voters a chance to decide on the expansion of gambling in Texas sat dead in the water in the 80th Legislature, despite the Texas license plates that fill parking lots at racetracks and casinos in neighboring states, carrying with them billions of dollars.

The bills were dead, despite an about-face from major gaming companies, which have decided that more gambling in Texas is a good thing, even if it initially steals revenue from their casinos in Louisiana, Oklahoma and New Mexico.

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Looks like gambling won't happen..The bills were defeated as announced in the Galveston Daily News last Sunday:

Lawmakers know when to fold on gambling

By Mark Collette

The Daily News Published June 3, 2007

It wasn't exactly a roll of the dice.

When State Sen. Rodney Ellis sat down for a two-hour subcommittee hearing on his gambling bills, he knew no one was taking bets. The bills had no chance. They never even went to the full State Affairs Committee for a hearing.

Yet there are signs that, two to four years from now, things could change.

Bills that would have given voters a chance to decide on the expansion of gambling in Texas sat dead in the water in the 80th Legislature, despite the Texas license plates that fill parking lots at racetracks and casinos in neighboring states, carrying with them billions of dollars.

The bills were dead, despite an about-face from major gaming companies, which have decided that more gambling in Texas is a good thing, even if it initially steals revenue from their casinos in Louisiana, Oklahoma and New Mexico.

That sucks. They are the ones stealing revenue from Texas.

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Galveston is just a neat spot to me. Not just a beach.

Bingo!

I live here in Clearwater, Florida now...beautiful beaches abound in the area for sure. But not one of them is a replacement for funky, eccentric and myriad GALVESTON!

Iron front Strand with its funky and cool shops and coffee houses. Seawolf park. Asian tourists riding tandem bikes. Low-income families fishing off some of the hotel piers. Wind and roller-bladers along an unimpeded and majestic Sea Wall vista. The pedestrian traffic all over especially at the point near a fave restaurant called Fishtails.

Galveston is touristy, industrial, port, tacky, quaint, fun, dirty, pretty, the 'hood, odd downtownish, and haunted ALL AT ONCE. It is a lovely and lively stew that greets you with the view of the Moody Gardens and Village of Tiki Island!

I don't see that here in Vanilla West Coast Florida, so resplendent with "beautiful" beaches. I think St. Pete Beach is kinda cool and all that but...(I mean, where the hell do you find a haunted, Victorian restaurant like Luigi's in Clearwater, Dunedin or Indian Rocks Beaches?)

Clearwater Beach...it's like rated the most beautiful city beach...but it's so BORING and vanilla at night. Galveston? That place has an eerie but EXHILIRATING nocturnal vibe with virtually some sort of supernatural ambience in comparison. How I rate my two beach towns?

"Beach": Clearwater Beach 1, Galveston 0

Varied Shopping: Galveston 1, Clearwater 0

Architecture: Galveston 1, Clearwater 0

Bars: Galveston 1, Clearwater 0

Movie Theater: Galveston 1, Clearwater 0

Rail trolley: Galveston 1, Clearwater 0

Spookiness: Galveston 1, Clearwater 0

Food: Galveston 1, Clearwater 0

Unhindered Sea Wall: Galveston 1, Clearwater 0

Buxom bikini babes: EVEN, more or less.

Non-pet rats amok: Galveston 1, Clearwater 0

Scientology Central proximity: Clearwater 1, Galveston 0

When you take "beach" out of the equation, it's clear that Galveston blows away one of America's premier touristy city post card beach towns.

In fairness, I grew up with both Clearwater Beach and Galveston. They are yin and yang to me overall though it's obviously more than just the beach for me. Those negative pickers who bash on Galveston's less-than-Florida aspect miss out on the entire package that the Moody and Enchanted Island is in its entire context. Galveston, unique as it is, has a rich culturally-loaded urban partner called Houston. Clearwater has, um. Tampa. No, Orlando. Yep, I'm diggin' historic fine Cuban cigars, Mickey Mouse and whiny expat New Yorkers who have dominated the proletariat hoagie food culture here.

Furthermore, don't Phoenix, Las Vegas, Atlanta, Denver, Dallas, St. Louis and other such great but coastless cities wish they can have a wonderful and weird island getaway that Houston has so close by? For Chicago, I guess you could always take a personal yacht to Gary, Indiana.

As said, if you want a fake beach, then come see me. Otherwise take it easy on a wonderful resource like Galveston. Any place can use improvement, Galveston included...but I think it's humorous to see huffing and puffing because it's not "Florida."

Edited by worldlyman

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Thank you worldlyman for your keen insights. I realize that complaints about the beach at Galveston are really made by people who only want the best for the city. The thing is, the majority of people are not even thinking about the beaches in terms of white or brown. Beaches are beaches, colors are colors, I mean...who cares really? Of course the city of Galveston has much to offer besides the beach.

Edited by moni

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The first step to improving Galveston beaches is everyone learning to clean up after themselves. I am there just about every weekend and am amazed at all the garbage left behind at the end of the day. Just last week while riding my bike I saw a woman parked on the seawall changing a child's diaper. On my ride back the woman and her car were gone, but the diaper was lying on the seawall, not 10 feet from a trash can! I agree that more could be done to maintain the beaches, but everyone has to be a part of the solution.

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The first step to improving Galveston beaches is everyone learning to clean up after themselves. I am there just about every weekend and am amazed at all the garbage left behind at the end of the day. Just last week while riding my bike I saw a woman parked on the seawall changing a child's diaper. On my ride back the woman and her car were gone, but the diaper was lying on the seawall, not 10 feet from a trash can! I agree that more could be done to maintain the beaches, but everyone has to be a part of the solution.

You certainly are right and people should clean up after themselves but a public beach invites everyone, good and bad, just like neighborhoods. Maybe a strict enforcement of the rules and a really high fine for breaking the rules, at least $500. Probably more beach patrols would help. With all the new developments moving into Galveston, you can be sure that those people will become more vocal about beach and seawall littering. Hopefully these kinds of things will discourage the "lower classes", to stay home and mess up their own place. And I don't mean racial classes, I mean "dirty" people, they should keep their nasty selves away from others.

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being from california I don't consider galveston beaches to be ugly. Yes florida has beautiful beaches, California decent beaches, but better rugged coastlines. Couyld galveston look better? Probably. But consider it's convenience to Houston I think it nice for them to have galveston. The beaches work and some people just plain like them. If they were so bad beach front homes wouldn't be renting year after year for thousands of dollars per week. Galveston is just a neat spot to me. Not just a beach.

The two issues you address above can and should be addressed separately IMO.

First, Galveston has a lot to offer in terms of land amenities and historic value.

Second, the beaches are crap for the most part and I believe something should be done. Back in the day, and i'm talking about in the 70's & 80's, the beaches were "planed" to remove the seaweed and to give the fresh look. Evidently, (and I have been accused of being many things, but Marine Biologist or Coastal Conservationist are not among them), the seaweed helps fight erosion so they leave it.

Problem is, leaving the seaweed is helping some of the sand stay, but forcing the people to leave (or more accurately, not come at all). I fail to believe, try though we may, there is anything we can do about the less-than-desirable appearance of the water. However, i have to believe we can do something about the way the beaches look that wouldn't threaten the coast line. It has to be possible.

For now, Galveston must sell itself IN SPITE OF its appearance. It seems within reality to sell itself BECAUSE OF its appearance, as well as other attributes....

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Does anyone know if Galveston has ever seriously considered just bringing in sand to build up the beaches? I know other coastal communities do that. I'm sure it would be expensive, but I have no idea how expensive. However, all of the pricey construction should be raising the property tax revenue of Galveston - in theory. Perhaps they could use some of the windfall to invest in the beaches. That way they could plow up the seaweed to beautify the beaches since the beach would be replenished with imported sand.

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I often times frequent Galveston and Surfside as well (down 288 for those of you unfamiliar.) I personally prefer Surfside for lazy beach lounging and swimming. But regardless, it too gets its fair share of trash washing up. Every singe time we visit no matter where we go we always take a garbage bag and clean up the general area. Yes we hate the trash, but looking at it or avoiding it is not going to change it. Freaking pick it up! even if its not your's. You don't have to be in a beach adoption program to care for that which you enjoy

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Does anyone know if Galveston has ever seriously considered just bringing in sand to build up the beaches? I know other coastal communities do that. I'm sure it would be expensive, but I have no idea how expensive. However, all of the pricey construction should be raising the property tax revenue of Galveston - in theory. Perhaps they could use some of the windfall to invest in the beaches. That way they could plow up the seaweed to beautify the beaches since the beach would be replenished with imported sand.

They did that back in the 90's...dredged a bunch of sand offshore and pumped it onto Galveston beaches. I think tens of millions of dollars were spent, and if I recall correctly, it was all washed away within a year by a couple of storms in the Gulf.

Big, big waste of money to try and beat Mama Nature.

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They did that back in the 90's...dredged a bunch of sand offshore and pumped it onto Galveston beaches. I think tens of millions of dollars were spent, and if I recall correctly, it was all washed away within a year by a couple of storms in the Gulf.

Big, big waste of money to try and beat Mama Nature.

From: Galveston.com, - Over the past three years, the city has been bringing in sand to widen the beaches between 10th and 61st Streets - as much as 150 feet in places - modeled after similar "beach nourishment projects" in Miami Beach, Fort Lauderdale and Daytona Beach.

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From: Galveston.com, - Over the past three years, the city has been bringing in sand to widen the beaches between 10th and 61st Streets - as much as 150 feet in places - modeled after similar "beach nourishment projects" in Miami Beach, Fort Lauderdale and Daytona Beach.

I have not witnessed the City doing so, but have noticed recently a few areas where the sand was only a foot or two below the Seawall.

Strict enforcement of existing litter laws and then using that revenue to clean up and replenish the beaches seems like a win/win to me.

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It's funny how some on this forum have conveniently left out the fact that there is literally...literally 2 ft of seaweed on the beaches right now. I went last weekend and we walked on seaweed so deep that it buried your foot and half your calf which then dumped into the gulf. No sand...seaweed. This was about two miles past the seawall on the gulf side.

For those on here who say "who cares...that's not were the tourists are," well I have news for you; the seawall area was in the same shape. Just not as deep. Something can be done, but nobody cares because it's "natural beauty." Blow that smoke up somebody else's ______. IMO** if the beaches were refurbished and MAINTAINED the influx of tourists would out-weigh the cost of keeping the beaches clean.

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Seaweed is a valuable crop. Someone should harvest it and make a bundle. Simple enough to contract the cleanup of seaweed to a biomedical company.

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It is a popular, nevertheless wrong misconception that Galveston is muddy because of the Mississippi. If we were muddy because of the Mississippi, then the water out in the Gulf would be muddy too. I can tell you from paddling my surfski just a mile or two off the beach out on West Beach that the water clears up and turns blue pretty fast. It is our own Texas rivers that do it, and it is completely natural. Galveston's water is muddy because of the silt that comes out of it from rivers like the Trinity, Brazos, etc. It is this silt that built up the Island. No silt, no Galveston. The silt makes the water muddy, and the silt becomes beach sand, so it is going to be fine and clumpy?

So how exactly are we supposed to clean up Galveston's beachs when they are naturally supposed to look like that?

As for the sargassum (seaweed) that washes up on the beach, scraping it off would also scrape off a lot of sand, which would contribute to beach erosion, which is a bad thing. Leaving it on not only does not harm the beach, it actually helps build the beach back up, because the seaweed provides a matrix that holds the sand in place and keeps so much of it from blowing away or being washed away.

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Living here (on the island) I may have a perspective of this that is missed by some of the people here who only visit on the weekends...

1. The beaches behind the seawall are scraped (and fluffed) everyday starting I believe at 4:00AM they are usually done by 8 ish. I see this everyday on my way to work so i know it happens. On particularly bad days for sargasum they will start using front end loaders to scoop up the seaweed after dark the night before. There is usually a crew of 6-8 people walking down the seawall and the beach picking up trash (im not saying they are the best but they are trying) The sargassum is raked on the west end occasionally at the request of the different neighborhoods (this varies based on who is in charge)

2. The monster sized mats of sargasum that float in during the spring and early summer would probably be 3-5' deep if they werent scraped daily, what this means is that even if the beach was cleaned 2 or 3 times a day the sargasum can wash up so quickly as to make it look like the beach isnt cleaned at all. obviously they cant clean the beach other than first thing in the morning for safety reasons.

3. The city digs sand from various places on the island and trucks it in to the beaches on the seawall. They seem to do this every other year or so. they spend millions doing this only to see it all get washed away! I'd like to see them look into other ways to keep the sand on the beach instead of spending more money on something thats only temporary http://www.rexross.com/reversingshoreline.html

4. The water does get to looking like chocolate milk alot of times. But, during the months of may-sept when the wind dies down for a few days in a row the water gets a nice green look to it. I have a window office on the 12th floor of the anico building in downtown and there are times during the year when you can see the clear "blue-green" water line less than a mile out. all in all id say that about 50% of the "prime time" beach season the beach water is decent looking.

5. Cleaning up the areas on the seawall where there is no beach is very dangerous because of the slick rocks and crashing waves and even still when it gets somewhat calm the city has crews out crawling among the rocks to pick up the trash and large driftwood. In the mornings you can tell when they are doing this because the top level of the seawall is literally covered in trash being thrown up to the trucks working above!

I will agree that we as a city can and should do more but I think the easiest thing the city could do is have an aggressive policy of enforcing littering laws.

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"I will agree that we as a city can and should do more but I think the easiest thing the city could do is have an aggressive policy of enforcing littering laws."

DON'T MESS WITH TEXAS!

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Living here (on the island) I may have a perspective of this that is missed by some of the people here who only visit on the weekends...

1. The beaches behind the seawall are scraped (and fluffed) everyday starting I believe at 4:00AM they are usually done by 8 ish. I see this everyday on my way to work so i know it happens. On particularly bad days for sargasum they will start using front end loaders to scoop up the seaweed after dark the night before. There is usually a crew of 6-8 people walking down the seawall and the beach picking up trash (im not saying they are the best but they are trying) The sargassum is raked on the west end occasionally at the request of the different neighborhoods (this varies based on who is in charge)

2. The monster sized mats of sargasum that float in during the spring and early summer would probably be 3-5' deep if they werent scraped daily, what this means is that even if the beach was cleaned 2 or 3 times a day the sargasum can wash up so quickly as to make it look like the beach isnt cleaned at all. obviously they cant clean the beach other than first thing in the morning for safety reasons.

3. The city digs sand from various places on the island and trucks it in to the beaches on the seawall. They seem to do this every other year or so. they spend millions doing this only to see it all get washed away! I'd like to see them look into other ways to keep the sand on the beach instead of spending more money on something thats only temporary http://www.rexross.com/reversingshoreline.html

Sorry, you're right, my place is out on the west side of the Island beyond city limits, where the city doesn't come in and take the seaweed away, I never go to the beach along the seawall, forgot they do that there. Of course, we have more beach between the vegetation line and the water line out west than the seawall beaches do, even though we don't pump sand there.....I wonder if our sargassum being left there has something to do with that?

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I often times frequent Galveston and Surfside as well (down 288 for those of you unfamiliar.) I personally prefer Surfside for lazy beach lounging and swimming. But regardless, it too gets its fair share of trash washing up. Every singe time we visit no matter where we go we always take a garbage bag and clean up the general area. Yes we hate the trash, but looking at it or avoiding it is not going to change it. Freaking pick it up! even if its not your's. You don't have to be in a beach adoption program to care for that which you enjoy

I agree and do likewise. When I have children with me I give them money for every bag of litter they fill. Money for ice cream is a great incentive. However if you are biking or jogging down the Seawall you won't get to far if you stop and pick up every piece of garbage you see. I can't imagine the thought process of someone who spends the day at the beach and then trashes the beach while there. People shouldn't have to clean up after other people, people should clean up after themselves!

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On 2/21/2007 at 5:33 PM, TJones said:

(HUGE BUZZER NOISE) WRONG !

Here Puma my friend, this gives a better explanation.

http://www.lazy-pelican.com/keeping-live-bait-alive.html

 

This refers to Galveston Bay, not the actual island. If it's suspended sediment, then the water should be clearer on calmer wind days.

 

On 2/22/2007 at 7:37 AM, brerrabbit said:

Not necessarily the Mississippi river but certainly the Sabine, the Trinity, the San Jacinto, the Brazos, and the Colorado all add to the problem. That combined with the fact that the Gulf is very shallow comparitivly speaking to other gulfs and oceans. It takes almost ten miles off shore to get past the hundred foot depth mark. Add it all up and you get murky water that deposits darker sand onto the beaches giving it a "dirty" look.

 

The Sabine,  Brazos, and Colorado rivers don't empty at Galveston.  The Trinity and San Jacinto go through Galveston bay before reaching Galveston, so much of the sediment should be deposited. 

 

The sheer bulk of discoloration clearly comes from the Mississippi River.

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On 3/2/2018 at 10:24 PM, AnTonY said:

 

This refers to Galveston Bay, not the actual island.

The island itself was formed by buildup of the same sediment that is suspended in the bay. And that same sediment extends out into the Gulf (which the bay is hydrologically part of).

 

On 3/2/2018 at 10:24 PM, AnTonY said:

 

 If it's suspended sediment, then the water should be clearer on calmer wind days.

Very fine suspended sediment takes several days of very still water to finally settle. One kickup of afternoon winds, one afternoon rainstorm, starts the clock all over again. But when we do get long stretches of doldrums and no rain, the gulf water often gets surprisingly clear, I've even snorkeled in it, I remember a few years ago it got where I could see my feet standing chest deep, and enjoyed following a school of spadefish for quite a while.

 

On 3/2/2018 at 10:24 PM, AnTonY said:

 

The Sabine,  Brazos, and Colorado rivers don't empty at Galveston.  The Trinity and San Jacinto go through Galveston bay before reaching Galveston, so much of the sediment should be deposited.

And the waters from the Trinity and San Jacinto keep on going through Bolivar Pass (and San Luis Pass to a lesser extent). Remember what I said about fine sediment taking a long time of still water to settle out? Well not only does the sediment from the rivers NOT have time to settle out, the currents the rivers create stir up sediment that has previously settled. 

 

Rivers also create plumes of sediment that fan out beyond a simple straight line out of their mouths. This is how deltas form. So just because the Sabine, Brazos, and Colorado rivers don't "empty at Galveston", doesn't mean their sediment can't make its way to Galveston.

 

And you're contradicting yourself here, you're saying the Sabine, Brazos, and Colorado, three rivers that are fairly close to Galveston can't affect Galveston water clarity because they don't empty at Galveston, but you are saying the Mississippi River, which is much farther away, can.

 

You're also not factoring in the longshore current, which runs parallel to the coastline, and which, in Galveston's case, happens to run West-Southwesterly (ie, from southwest to northeast), pulling sediment from the Colorado and Brazos towards Galveston.

 

On 3/2/2018 at 10:24 PM, AnTonY said:

The sheer bulk of discoloration clearly comes from the Mississippi River.

No, it doesn't, you're wrong, this has been definitively dealt with. The shear bulk of discoloration in Galveston comes from Texas rivers, NOT from the Mississippi. The Loop Current carries Mississippi water AWAY from Texas, not toward it. It makes no sense that you are so invested in the Mississippi source misconception.

 

 

On 3/5/2018 at 1:56 AM, AnTonY said:

 

Actually, the muddiness in Galveston Bay may not always have been:
https://www.chron.com/opinion/king/article/Galveston-Bay-s-muddy-waters-solely-our-fault-5610001.php

Bill King is both right and wrong. He's right that the bay used to be, and could be, clearer, and that oyster dredging and loss of seagrass makes for a silt bottom that is easily stirred up, making the bay murkier. If you look at Dana Cove, on the bay side of Galveston Bay State Park, where I've been canoeing and kayaking and fishing for 35 years, the planting of seagrass and placement of geotubes as breakwaters to shelter the cove and allow the seagrass to take hold since the 90s has absolutely made that water body clearer. When I was a boy in the 80s, it was nothing but puffermud and opaque brown water, but now when I paddle through it, I can see to the bottom, see flounder, stingray, crabs, etc. in the dense seagrass.

 

But King is off-base comparing the Great Lakes to Galveston Bay, especially using clarity as a benchmark. Clear water is not necessarily a sign of a healthy ecosystem, and the Great Lakes continue to struggle with water pollution, worse than Galveston Bay in some ways. And one reason why the Great Lakes have become so clear in recent years is the invasive zebra mussel, which filters plankton and nutrients out of the water - plankton and nutrients that native Great Lakes organisms need. It's not just the sediment that makes Galveston Bay waters murky, it's also the plankton, and that goes hand in hand with Galveston Bay being one of the most biologically productive estuaries in the United States. It blows the Great Lakes out of the water in terms of biomass density and biodiversity. You can see how much a role plankton plays in water turbidity in Galveston Bay during winter when the plankton doesn't bloom like it does during the summer. The water is much clearer in the winter, and a deep slate blue instead of greenish-brown.

 

As a final note, if you look at my profile, you'll see I'm an environmental scientist, so I kinda know what I'm talking about here.

Edited by Reefmonkey

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There should be a crystal blue lagoon development in Galveston. Along with some Hampton's type development. 

Edited by Elseed

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On 12/10/2018 at 1:56 PM, Elseed said:

There should be a crystal blue lagoon development in Galveston. Along with some Hampton's type development. 

What exactly do you mean by “crystal blue lagoon development “?

 

And what do you mean by “Hampton’s type  development?”  The Hamptons are a bunch of 200-300 year old towns, how do we recreate that artificially and why should we want to try to become an inferior wannabe clone of a NY East Coast experience  instead of the authentic Gulf Coast town we already are?

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On 12/17/2018 at 6:56 AM, Reefmonkey said:

What exactly do you mean by “crystal blue lagoon development “?

 What I mean is; there should be a a crystal clear blue lagoon development created in/around Galveston Beach. This project would be close to the beach and it will have a crystal clear blue lagoon anchoring it.

 

 

 

 

On 12/17/2018 at 6:56 AM, Reefmonkey said:

 

And what do you mean by “Hampton’s type  development?”  The Hamptons are a bunch of 200-300 year old towns, how do we recreate that artificially and why should we want to try to become an inferior wannabe clone of a NY East Coast experience  instead of the authentic Gulf Coast town we already are?

 

As for “Hampton’s type  development”, I mean; there should be a “Hampton’s type  development" in Galveston. No one said it has to be exactly like the Hampton's, that's why I wrote; “Hampton’s type  development." Notice the word "type." This development doesn't have to be inferior and it could essentially be just a neighborhood; at first. Then it can grow to whatever the developers or the city's hearts desires. Also, the "authentic Gulf Coast town" experience is a pretty crappy experience if you ask me. You've got to have vision Reefmonkey or you'll just continue to make the same crappy development that Houston and Texas is so used too.

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12 hours ago, Elseed said:

 

As for “Hampton’s type  development”, I mean; there should be a “Hampton’s type  development" in Galveston. No one said it has to be exactly like the Hampton's, that's why I wrote; “Hampton’s type  development." Notice the word "type." This development doesn't have to be inferior and it could essentially be just a neighborhood; at first. Then it can grow to whatever the developers or the city's hearts desires. Also, the "authentic Gulf Coast town" experience is a pretty crappy experience if you ask me. You've got to have vision Reefmonkey or you'll just continue to make the same crappy development that Houston and Texas is so used too.

 

https://www.beachtown.com/

Edited by Houston19514

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On 12/10/2018 at 1:56 PM, Elseed said:

There should be a crystal blue lagoon development in Galveston. Along with some Hampton's type development. 

Nope. There should be no further development West of the Seawall, and every effort made to remove existing development there. Behind the seawall, there should be no additional highrise development. In other words, let's not destroy Galveston by overbuilding crappy million dollar beach houses when there's no need for them.

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On 12/24/2018 at 11:36 AM, Ross said:

Nope. There should be no further development West of the Seawall, and every effort made to remove existing development there. Behind the seawall, there should be no additional highrise development. In other words, let's not destroy Galveston by overbuilding crappy million dollar beach houses when there's no need for them.

 

Nah, I think they're should be more development in Galveston. Just not any lame development.

On 12/24/2018 at 9:54 AM, Houston19514 said:

 Well there ya have it! Just more of it and much cooler for cooler people.

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On 12/23/2018 at 9:43 PM, Elseed said:

 What I mean is; there should be a a crystal clear blue lagoon development created in/around Galveston Beach. This project would be close to the beach and it will have a crystal clear blue lagoon anchoring it.

 

 

 

 

 

As for “Hampton’s type  development”, I mean; there should be a “Hampton’s type  development" in Galveston. No one said it has to be exactly like the Hampton's, that's why I wrote; “Hampton’s type  development." Notice the word "type." This development doesn't have to be inferior and it could essentially be just a neighborhood; at first. Then it can grow to whatever the developers or the city's hearts desires. Also, the "authentic Gulf Coast town" experience is a pretty crappy experience if you ask me. You've got to have vision Reefmonkey or you'll just continue to make the same crappy development that Houston and Texas is so used too.

 

You've just repeated what you have said, without any clarification or attempt to operationally define what you mean.

 

I've been to the Hamptons before. The public beaches are crowded and not really all that much more picturesque than Galveston, plus parking is expensive and kind of a nightmare, as is even getting to the Hamptons from New York City on a summer weekend. The hip restaurants and bars are expensive and difficult to get into - even difficult to get a reservation at, unless you're "somebody" (ie, famous or well-known to be rich). A lot of the best shoreline is inaccessible to the hoi polloi, can't even be seen behind high privacy walls.

 

On the "crystal clear blue lagoon" are you saying you want a large sheltered body of water, in which the water has no turbidity from suspended sediments or phytoplankton? First, you're going to have to have a sealed bottom, like concrete or gunnite, to replace the natural silt that makes up Galveston Island which gets stirred up and causes much of the turbidity in Galveston bay and beach water. Then, whatever water you fill this impoundment with is going to have to be continually filtered to prevent the impoundment from becoming a stagnant algae-choked swamp. One way to go would be to filter seawater through a semi-closed system. You'd have to have pretty good retention time on the water to eventually get rid of the finest suspended solids, but you'd also need to bring in new water periodically to keep your nutrient load low to reduce algae growth, and to replace water lost to evaporation. It would be a constant balancing act, and pretty energy and maintenance-intensive (read: expensive) for an impoundment of any size to handle the kinds of crowds who might be interested in it. It would never be "crystal clear", but could be significantly clearer than the bay or the beachwater. And it's never going to be blue, because you're going to have algae growth on your hard artificial bottom, so it's going to be green, not blue, plus that algae growth will make that hard bottom slippery, as anyone who has ever waded on a boat ramp knows.

 

The only option that would actually give you "crystal clear blue" water would be to chlorinate, which would give you a giant swimming pool, which Galveston already has in Palm Beach at Moody Gardens, and at Schlitterbahn, for that matter. Seems you're the one who might have the problem with vision, Elseed, since you apparently overlooked these two attractions. Just like you overlooked Beachtown on the Hamptons side of your wish list. It appears your impression of Galveston being a "pretty crappy experience" stems from being ill-informed about what the island actually has to offer. In 2016 6.5 million visitors spent $780 million dollars in Galveston, which generated $1.1 billion in total business sales, including indirect and induced impacts. Compare that to the 2.25 million people who visited the Florida Keys, which have a more year-round vacation climate, that same year. Seems Galveston is doing pretty well attracting visitors, despite your opinion of it. Why don't you go to the Hamptons and see how far you'd get on the same amount of money it takes to have a nice summer weekend down in Galveston? Or maybe since you seem partial to artificial manufactured simulacra of some "ideal" destination, you'd be more comfortable at Disneyworld?

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Posted (edited)
On 1/2/2019 at 11:43 AM, Reefmonkey said:

 

You've just repeated what you have said, without any clarification or attempt to operationally define what you mean.

 

I've been to the Hamptons before. The public beaches are crowded and not really all that much more picturesque than Galveston, plus parking is expensive and kind of a nightmare, as is even getting to the Hamptons from New York City on a summer weekend. The hip restaurants and bars are expensive and difficult to get into - even difficult to get a reservation at, unless you're "somebody" (ie, famous or well-known to be rich). A lot of the best shoreline is inaccessible to the hoi polloi, can't even be seen behind high privacy walls.

 

On the "crystal clear blue lagoon" are you saying you want a large sheltered body of water, in which the water has no turbidity from suspended sediments or phytoplankton? First, you're going to have to have a sealed bottom, like concrete or gunnite, to replace the natural silt that makes up Galveston Island which gets stirred up and causes much of the turbidity in Galveston bay and beach water. Then, whatever water you fill this impoundment with is going to have to be continually filtered to prevent the impoundment from becoming a stagnant algae-choked swamp. One way to go would be to filter seawater through a semi-closed system. You'd have to have pretty good retention time on the water to eventually get rid of the finest suspended solids, but you'd also need to bring in new water periodically to keep your nutrient load low to reduce algae growth, and to replace water lost to evaporation. It would be a constant balancing act, and pretty energy and maintenance-intensive (read: expensive) for an impoundment of any size to handle the kinds of crowds who might be interested in it. It would never be "crystal clear", but could be significantly clearer than the bay or the beachwater. And it's never going to be blue, because you're going to have algae growth on your hard artificial bottom, so it's going to be green, not blue, plus that algae growth will make that hard bottom slippery, as anyone who has ever waded on a boat ramp knows.

 

The only option that would actually give you "crystal clear blue" water would be to chlorinate, which would give you a giant swimming pool, which Galveston already has in Palm Beach at Moody Gardens, and at Schlitterbahn, for that matter. Seems you're the one who might have the problem with vision, Elseed, since you apparently overlooked these two attractions. Just like you overlooked Beachtown on the Hamptons side of your wish list. It appears your impression of Galveston being a "pretty crappy experience" stems from being ill-informed about what the island actually has to offer. In 2016 6.5 million visitors spent $780 million dollars in Galveston, which generated $1.1 billion in total business sales, including indirect and induced impacts. Compare that to the 2.25 million people who visited the Florida Keys, which have a more year-round vacation climate, that same year. Seems Galveston is doing pretty well attracting visitors, despite your opinion of it. Why don't you go to the Hamptons and see how far you'd get on the same amount of money it takes to have a nice summer weekend down in Galveston? Or maybe since you seem partial to artificial manufactured simulacra of some "ideal" destination, you'd be more comfortable at Disneyworld?

Sorry bud but I'm right. Galveston should have a Hamptons type development. It'll be amazing. Oh, and Galveston should have a man made lagoon. It'll look amazing. It'll be breathtaking.

Edited by Elseed

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I'd like to see Galveston Island back like it was when I was growing up about 40 miles from there, mid '40s to mid '60s. You could drive on West Beach, all the way from end of seawall to San Luis Pass. If you wanted to stop, fish, swim, camp overnight, etc. anywhere along the way, that was OK. For the most part, people put their trash in provided barrels along the beach. I especially remember surf fishing (caught mostly sand sharks & small hammerheads) and floundering at San Luis Pass. If you didn't want to take the slow route on the beach, the road to the Pass was a "two laner" all the way. Parking on the beach with girlfriends was another good memory from late teenage years.

 

I know, these are just irrelevant memories from an old Texan/Houstonian & times have changed.

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On 1/5/2019 at 10:17 PM, Elseed said:

Sorry bud but I'm right. Galveston should have a Hamptons type development. It'll be amazing. Oh, and Galveston should have a man made lagoon. It'll look amazing. It'll be breathtaking.

 

Well since I laid out very detailed reasons in both threads why your ideas for Galveston development are ill-considered, and all you could come up with in response was "no, I'm right, it would be amazing," it's pretty obvious to anyone who reads these threads that you are not right, and have no idea what you're talking about, as others have attempted to point out to you.

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On 12/24/2018 at 11:36 AM, Ross said:

Nope. There should be no further development West of the Seawall, and every effort made to remove existing development there. Behind the seawall, there should be no additional highrise development. In other words, let's not destroy Galveston by overbuilding crappy million dollar beach houses when there's no need for them.

 

Don't worry, thankfully, the City of Galveston is wiser than Elseed, after Ike they determined that investing any more money in infrastructure that would allow large-scale development beyond the seawall was irresponsible, and that (along with the economic downturn) cratered a proposed high rise development at Stewart Road and 12-Mile Road. The development had no business being there in the first place, as well as being environmentally unsustainable would have been a bad neighbor to surrounding neighborhoods that were already there. The developer had already broken ground (regrading and digging "lakes") and had presold some units, so certainly was out a bit of money when the project was cancelled, and in 10 years nobody has picked up where they left off because COG said they won't put in sewer and water to service the demand a highrise would create.

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