Jump to content

Bill's House


BenH

Recommended Posts

I agree that it's not a house many would love at first glance. It takes the idea of a cathederal ceiling to its ultimate conclusion, doesn't it?! Caudill wanted you to get that sense of space and grandeur when walking from the very low ceiling of the dining room into the cathederal of the living room. The view from inside is pretty incredible, especially with the bayou just behind it. But it is very church-like.

The current owners love modern art, so the walls that aren't glass are fun to look at too.

Was CRS most famous Houston building Jones Hall?

From:

http://eng.archinform.net/arch/6292.htm?scrwdt=1024

William W. Caudill

American architect.

Study:

1933-37 Oklahoma State University, Stillwater;

1937-39 the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge.

1946 in Houston as well as John Miles Rowlett and starting from 1948 with Wallie Eugene Scott the architect's office Caudill Rowlett Scott, starting from 1950 created as CRS Inc., with branch offices in New York, Hartford/Connecticut among other things. Caudill kept the line up to its death.

Training activity:

1939-42, ' 46-49 Texas A&M University, there founders of Texas engineering experiment station;

1961-69 (you School of Architecture), ' 69-71 Rice University, Houston.

Member: among other things.

AIA board of Directors.

1969 initial member Academy of Texas.

Numerous honors and prices, among other things:

1957 the Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti; AIA Firm Award;

1970 Planner of the Year Award;

1978 gold medal rope sigma delta Fraternity, Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture;

1983 gold medal AIA (postum).

C and its company were starting from the 60's internationally well-known, particularly by training and buildings of universities. Methodically he was a convincing proponent of teamwork and taut office organization; herein it applied for many American architect's offices as model. He saw the task of architecture in the linkage of organization and modern technology.

New York Times Obit:

Published: June 30, 1983

William W. Caudill, an architect, educator and author, died at his home in Houston on June 25.

He was 69 years old. Mr. Caudill was founder of the CRS Group of Houston, an international architecture and construction company. He lectured in the United States and abroad on design, and was a member of the American Institute of Architects. Mr. Caudill was the author of a dozen books in his field, including ''Toward Better School Design'' and ''Architecture by Team.''

He is survived by his wife, Aleen; a daughter, Susan Kent Caudill of Dallas, and a son, William W. Caudill of Houston.

Not to rain on anyones parade, but at least from that view, that's an ugly house. A box with an acute triangle sitting on top.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree that it's not a house many would love at first glance. It takes the idea of a cathederal ceiling to its ultimate conclusion, doesn't it?! Caudill wanted you to get that sense of space and grandeur when walking from the very low ceiling of the dining room into the cathederal of the living room. The view from inside is pretty incredible, especially with the bayou just behind it. But it is very church-like.

The current owners love modern art, so the walls that aren't glass are fun to look at too.

Yeah, I guess I'd have to see it in person and the inside of it. Because that picture obviously isn't doing it justice if y'all say it's as great as it is.

How'd y'all see the inside anyway?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is an odd house, but in a luring type of way. It certainly makes one want to see inside. It is probably one of those rarities where you can call something ugly/beautiful. There is a house in Timberwilde that is a flat roofed modernist mansion and it has a massive pyramid sitting on top. This reminds me of that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's a link to the house in Timberwilde, M. Brichford posted it on lottaliving. I thought I remembered the pyramid being more massive in person. I haven't been on this street in a while.

http://www.lottaliving.com/gallery/main.ph...g2_itemId=10862

You'll get a great look at it soon. I shot that house this past weekend. Wonderful place with wonderful owners. They built the house in 1967. The pyramid is supported by four wooden pillars on the inside, with the living spaces designed around it. The idea is to have a greenhouse inside the home and most of the rooms open into it. The back is all glass with a marvelous view of the bayou and walking trails. Richard Colley (the architect, who worked with O'neil Ford) did a massive amount of detailing and the materials are pretty unique. It's in pristine condition. More when the website is up.

By the way, I would NOT suggest driving down that street to take pictures unless you are the guest of someone who lives there. Yes, it's a public street and you would not be breaking any laws, but you will be asking for trouble from private security. They constantly monitor the happenings in that neighborhood, as some EXTREMELY wealthy people live there. Trust me on this.

Edited by BenH
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You'll get a great look at it soon. I shot that house this past weekend. Wonderful place with wonderful owners. They built the house in 1967. The pyramid is supported by four wooden pillars on the inside, with the living spaces designed around it. The idea is to have a greenhouse inside the home and most of the rooms open into it. The back is all glass with a marvelous view of the bayou and walking trails. Richard Colley (the architect, who worked with O'neil Ford) did a massive amount of detailing and the materials are pretty unique. It's in pristine condition. More when the website is up.

By the way, I would NOT suggest driving down that street to take pictures unless you are the guest of someone who lives there. Yes, it's a public street and you would not be breaking any laws, but you will be asking for trouble from private security. They constantly monitor the happenings in that neighborhood, as some EXTREMELY wealthy people live there. Trust me on this.

I'm looking forward to seeing the photos that you took! I love that house and the Price designed house down the street.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love the Price House too! It's one of my favorite houses in Houston. Any background info on that architect?

It's great to hear these houses are being documented. They are definitely in the crosshairs of the wrecking ball, should they ever be sold. That land is just too valuable to have a 50 year old house sitting on it! (please hear the sarcasm in my typing)

Jason

I'm looking forward to seeing the photos that you took! I love that house and the Price designed house down the street.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I could be mis-remembering but I seem to remember that Thomas Price was a friend of Howard Barnstone's, and he served as Barnstone's guide during his researching of what became the book _The Galveston That Was_ in the mid-60s. Apparently, Price died in Galveston from a freak fall just before a meeting with Barnstone, and Barnstone was, as you might expect, deeply upset by this. Price stepped through some kind of emergency exit door while trying to find a restroom and fell several feet to his death. The story is related in the introduction to _The Galveston That Was_; or I could be all wrong and it was someone else.

marmer

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love ... the Price designed house down the street.

The Price designed house is owned by the chairman of Weingarten Realty. He and his son are architectural aficionados. Other important architectural landmarks they own are the River Oaks Shopping Center, River Oaks Theater, and Alabama Theatre. The Price designed house is an economic misimprovement according to the Harris County Appraisal District.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Price designed house is owned by the chairman of Weingarten Realty. He and his son are architectural aficionados. Other important architectural landmarks they own are the River Oaks Shopping Center, River Oaks Theater, and Alabama Theatre. The Price designed house is an economic misimprovement according to the Harris County Appraisal District.

So is David Red's house on Sunset Blvd. and basically every other old mod out there. I would love to get into the Price designed house; fell for it the moment I saw it in person. The guide photo doesn't do it justice at all.

Edited by BenH
Link to comment
Share on other sites

By the way, I would NOT suggest driving down that street to take pictures unless you are the guest of someone who lives there. Yes, it's a public street and you would not be breaking any laws, but you will be asking for trouble from private security. They constantly monitor the happenings in that neighborhood, as some EXTREMELY wealthy people live there. Trust me on this.

You could just carry a clipboard and claim to be a HCAD inspector! Bonus points for non-descript vehicle and white dress shirt with tie. :lol:

marmer

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You could just carry a clipboard and claim to be a HCAD inspector! Bonus points for non-descript vehicle and white dress shirt with tie. :lol:

marmer

That's awesome! We really need to come up with some kind of game this. How many points for trespassing?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...

Yes, it's been on my mind a lot. I don't know and I'm afraid to ask if it's going to survive. I guess I'll brace myself for the news. If it does get torn down, I think it's the biggest loss since the Mitchell House, though some may argue the Bousquet House or the Bentsen House. If it gets torn down, that's 2 of the houses from the 2005 RDA tour gone. Ponder that a minute.

Jason

You guys probably know this but this house is currently for sale on HAR:Caudill House, although it's already OP.

Amazing place.

Sorry, but the link above doesn't work. Let's try this one: Caudill House on HAR.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There is a sort of Richard Neutra vibe to some of the areas in this house which I love, particularly in the sunroom. The steep vault in the great room is awkward, but I think this is a very interesting house and hopefully it will be respected.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...