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2 hours ago, shasta said:

I still am shocked how much they VE'd this project from the original design and layout. This project is right up there with the downtown Embassy Suites level of ruined projects, if you ask me. maybe even worse because it will continue to get worse. It looks really bad.

 

It went from a collection of architecturally different buildings and interesting urban streetscapes to a cheap looking ruin of the mill monolithic apartment building . Even the retail is cheap looking..I drive by it everyday and shake my head of what could have been!

GID breaks ground on phase two of Regent Square mixed-use near Buffalo  Bayou - Houston Business Journal

 

Regent Square Houston | Wordsearch

Regent Square | www.huitt-zollars.com

At least we have City Center and the River Oaks district for developers that understand what quality mixed use developments are supposed to look like.

 

Too bad because this one has the best location and the potential to be the best new project in all of Houston. What a colossal disappointment.

 

In 10 years, this project will be considered so low quality that it might be well below market rate apartments.

They've definitely botched it so far. I almost loathe The Sterling compared to what they initially envisioned. It encapsulates Houston development in every sense of the phrase. No need to cut them any slack, they're a massive development firm. 

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This project was doomed after they changed architecture firms. I have a friend who was the lead for this project and they couldn't get the developer to moved and then It went dormant for several years. The developer came back and changed firms, and the scope and vision were completely redirected or misdirected. Originally they were going to have several prominent firms designs an urban cluster of mid to high rise  buildings that would create a walkable area, but unfortunately they scrapped all of the good stuff and went with this abomination. If I never hear the words, " it's better that a vacant lot" again, I'll be so happy. This won't go away soon. We're stuck with mediocrity for the next fifty years, and unfortunately they own a whole lot of land in this neighborhood. Its going to be the stucco capital of Houston when they get done, and has the makings of a dated Three Fountains apartments area on Fountain View.

 

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On 8/27/2021 at 2:30 PM, HoustonBoy said:

Are we all overlooking the massive tower in the first picture of the model? Is that not a new tower? It looks great. Almost Art Deco. 

 

It looks like it will replace this portion of Allen House, just south of Sovereign at Regent Square 

 

image.png.d74bfbca11cebf8eb560d09279db542b.png

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24 minutes ago, tigereye said:

That freaking sucks

Edited by wilcal
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12 minutes ago, wilcal said:

That freaking sucks

Hay Merchant is a cool place, and there's still time to enjoy it.

 

However, this little bit is interesting:

 

Quote

Leaving the current building also removes Georgia James from potential disruptions by imminent street construction on Waugh and whatever closures take place as Skanska redevelops the property at Montrose and Westheimer that previously housed Spec’s and Half Price Books. The aging building, previously home to a lesbian bar named Chances, needs significant work, according to Shepherd, and he's ready to be in new construction that will need less of his attention.

 

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21 minutes ago, Montrose1100 said:

The aging building, previously home to a lesbian bar named Chances, needs significant work

To split hairs, there were two tenants in that building; Chances was on the east side, the space now occupied by Hay Market. Prior to Chances, this was the home of the infamous Boobie Rock.
Charlie's Coffee Shop was in the western portion, which is the current Georgia James location.

Edited by dbigtex56
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According to The Hay Merchant's Facrbook page the bar is closing. Massive loss to the craft beer scene. The Resturnat next door is moving to Regent.

 

So, you have probably heard the big news…After 10 years at 1100 Westheimer, we will be departing our current location—home of Georgia James and Hay Merchant—and Georgia James will relocate to Regent Square HTX.
With this new change, the obvious question that comes up is "what will happen to Hay Merchant?"
While the OG Hay Merchant is closing, we are going to do our very best to keep the Hay Merchant spirit alive throughout the company. While we are unsure if we will be able to open a new location, we do want to continue having weekly trivia nights, hosting watch parties & sporting events, as well offering a place to gather with friends to enjoy a good cocktail or beer. Additionally, you’ll still be able to get a damn good burger at the upcoming Underbelly Burger that will be opening at the Houston Farmer’s Market soon.
Trust us, we love Hay Merchant just as much as you do. We are committed to preserving the elements that make Hay Merchant so special, and we will continue to share updates as we know more about what this transition looks like.
Until then, we have until the end of the year to celebrate this amazing place. We plan to go out with a bang, and we hope you will join us!
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9 hours ago, Jimmy Bob said:

The Regent Square construction team worked overnight Friday night.  We listened to the trucks backing up all night.  What can be done to stop this?  There are posted work hours for these types of projects.

 

 

Depends on the circumstances.

Some portions of a project can only be done at night or in the early hours of the morning.

If a project is behind schedule, or a project is trying to get ahead of schedule then they will go to overnight hours.

In most circumstances there are no limitations on work hours unless construction is taking place in a neighborhood with deed restrictions that limit work hours, or if there are city ordinances which prevent working in the evening, night, or early morning.

To my knowledge there aren't any in this area which would prevent a contractor from working a project at night, nor do they have to give advance warning. While providing advanced warning would build a better relationship with the community, it isn't something they have to do.

I mean go ahead and check, but more than likely you won't get the desired result.

Do understand though that this isn't legal advice, or industry advice I'm providing. I'm just simply stating what I know from my experience.

If you are concerned, maybe just ask someone on the job at some point, and ask what their work schedule is or will be in the future and if they are going to continue with late hours into the night. You'd be surprised how open and willing foreman, subs, etc... are willing to help with questions or just chat about the project in general as most are very proud of the work they do and take it pretty seriously.

From what I've observed in photos posted on here thus far, this project is nearing or getting pretty close to substantial completion. At the very least they will be moving from exterior work to interiors in a short while, so I don't suspect they will be pulling a lot of late nights.

Hope that helps.

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pretty sure there is a sound ordinance in all of Houston, not just residential.

https://library.municode.com/tx/houston/codes/code_of_ordinances?nodeId=COOR_CH30NOSOLERE

residential outlines specific DB levels, but in general the following is defined:

Quote

It is unlawful for any person to make, assist in making, permit, continue, cause to be made or continued, or permit the continuance of any loud, unnecessary, or unusual sound or noise that disturbs, injures, or endangers the comfort, repose, health, peace, or safety of others. In determining whether a sound or noise is loud, unnecessary, or unusual, the following factors shall be considered...

there's a section of the defense of loud noises specific to construction:

Quote

The sound was produced by the erection, excavation, construction, or demolition of any building or structure, including the use of any necessary tools or equipment, conducted between the hours of 7 a.m. and 8 p.m., which activity did not produce a sound exceeding 85 dB(A) when measured from the property line of the residential property where the sound is being received.

next time it happens, call the cops (non emergency number) and report the noise. although 85dB is probably not going to be met, they will still send someone to the site. especially if there are multiple noise complaints.

edit: actually, reading that last part, I think the 85dB limit is between 7a and 8p, outside of those hours there doesn't appear to be any noise limit they can work within, unless I am reading it wrong, outside of 7a-8p they can't make any unnecessary noise that would disturb, or endanger comfort.

Edited by samagon
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1 hour ago, j_cuevas713 said:

All these developments offering high comfort walkability are really changing the landscape of the city. That in combination with local TIRZ improvements and the road overlay packages are drastically changing the aesthetics of the city. 

It does hurt that TIRZ are such a key component because of equity issues. Some places that need the most help don't have that support :/

BUT, I'm not trying to be a debbie downer here. This project looks great!

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2 hours ago, j_cuevas713 said:

All these developments offering high comfort walkability are really changing the landscape of the city. That in combination with local TIRZ improvements and the road overlay packages are drastically changing the aesthetics of the city. 

More impressive is that its private companies doing this themselves rather than specific city planning. Although good city planning helps properly stitch these large developments together in a seamless way (that will be the next step if that could be achieved), its better than what was on offering before.

Now the only thing thats missing is obviously retail, and people. Lets see how this space works once those start up.

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On 1/9/2022 at 1:56 PM, Luminare said:

More impressive is that its private companies doing this themselves rather than specific city planning. Although good city planning helps properly stitch these large developments together in a seamless way (that will be the next step if that could be achieved), its better than what was on offering before.

If anything, this shows how much we don't need more extensive city planning. Developers are doing this because there is a demand for these kinds of spaces and this kind of development. The city didn't have to do jack, and its reaping the benefits. And better the city didn't do anything, because it would only mess up and do things to make these kinds of developments (or other kinds of developments that aren't like this) impossible, like in so many other cities.

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13 minutes ago, Big E said:

If anything, this shows how much we don't need more extensive city planning. Developers are doing this because there is a demand for these kinds of spaces and this kind of development. The city didn't have to do jack, and its reaping the benefits. And better the city didn't do anything, because it would only mess up and do things to make these kinds of developments (or other kinds of developments that aren't like this) impossible, like in so many other cities.

I don't think the fact that one development in a hundred worked out well is an indication of that at all. 

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3 minutes ago, editor said:

I don't think the fact that one development in a hundred worked out well is an indication of that at all. 

17 minutes ago, Big E said:

If anything, this shows how much we don't need more extensive city planning. Developers are doing this because there is a demand for these kinds of spaces and this kind of development. The city didn't have to do jack, and its reaping the benefits. And better the city didn't do anything, because it would only mess up and do things to make these kinds of developments (or other kinds of developments that aren't like this) impossible, like in so many other cities.

I actually agree with both statements here. Both of true in different ways. @editor You are right. We currently don't have enough of a sample size from the pool of developments currently on going/ completed, etc... to really acknowledge that the totality of what @Big E said is correct, but at the same time Big E is correct in that in regards to how Houston functions as a city, if the city were to start step in and muck around and do things to these developments with the lack of experience they have it would only result in problems. Has every development faired greatly from this approach? No, but these companies, developers, architects, and contractors are learning from one another, and whats important is, on average are these developments getting slightly better over time? I would say yes. As long as the mean is improving relative to where things were at before, then I call that a success, and if this is without bloating central government to achieve that incremental improvement, then that is a wild success.

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On 1/11/2022 at 4:29 PM, Big E said:

If anything, this shows how much we don't need more extensive city planning. Developers are doing this because there is a demand for these kinds of spaces and this kind of development. The city didn't have to do jack, and its reaping the benefits. And better the city didn't do anything, because it would only mess up and do things to make these kinds of developments (or other kinds of developments that aren't like this) impossible, like in so many other cities.

Uh...No. We have some of the worst infrastructure and planning of any major world city that claims to be "alpha status".

We desperately need some kind of city plan, or vision, or we will continue to have have haphazard developments , some quality, but surrounded by poor sidewalks, no connectivity, even ditches a block or two over. .....quite pathetic

The strategy for Houston, and most of Texas, is to pass on the costs of infrastructure on to the developer. You want this development YOU help pay for the sidewalk upgrades, etc...no coincidence they are doing sidewalk and street upgrades right now around Regent Square and the Hanover project.

I'd love to see the actual breakdown of who paid for that.  The city of Houston sometimes applies for Federal money for improvements...but this is Texas so they do so lightly because those sitting in the Capitol Building in Austin do not like that move.

Texas even rejects federal funds that were GIVEN to us (i.e. Tom DeLay rejecting light rail funding). The joke is on us because THOSE funds just go to competitor cities that gladly take the federal funds that taxpayers ALREADY have paid for...

It will be very interesting to see how Texas handles President Biden's Infrastructure Bill....so do we ACCEPT the federal funds earmarked for improvements in Texas or do we REJECT the funding out of political pride and grandstanding?

Edited by shasta
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6 hours ago, shasta said:

Uh...No. We have some of the worse infrastructure and planning of any major world city that claims to be "alpha status".

We desperately need some kind of city plan, or vision, or we will continue to have have haphazard developments , some quality, but surrounded by poor sidewalks, no connectivity, even ditches a block or two over. .....quite pathetic

The strategy for Houston, and most of Texas, is to pass on the costs of infrastructure on to the developer. You want this development YOU help pay for the sidewalk upgrades, etc...no coincidence they are doing sidewalk and street upgrades right now around Regent Square and the Hanover project.

I'd love to se the actual breakdown of who paid for that.  The city of Houston sometimes applies fro Federal money for improvements...but this is Texas so they do so lightly because those sitting in the Capitol Building in Austin do not like that move.

Texas even rejects federal funds that were GIVEN to us (i.e. Tom DeLay rejecting light rail funding). The joke is on us because THOSE funds just go to competitor cities that gladly take the federal funds that taxpayers ALREADY have paid for...

It will be very interesting to see how Texas handles President Biden's Infrastructure Bill....so we ACCEPT the federal funds earmarked for improvements in Texas or do we REJECT the funding out of political pride and grandstanding?

You know damn well that the major cities in Texas will not see a single cent of that money. All of it will be funneled to rural areas because that is where the state governments voter base is and “big city bad.”

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On 1/12/2022 at 4:07 PM, jmitch94 said:

You know damn well that the major cities in Texas will not see a single cent of that money. All of it will be funneled to rural areas because that is where the state governments voter base is and “big city bad.”

Shhhhh....Don't tell him.

 

On 1/12/2022 at 9:49 AM, shasta said:

The strategy for Houston, and most of Texas, is to pass on the costs of infrastructure on to the developer. You want this development YOU help pay for the sidewalk upgrades, etc...no coincidence they are doing sidewalk and street upgrades right now around Regent Square and the Hanover project.

I actually fail to see how that's a bad thing? Part of the reason suburban sprawl is what is, is because the states and federal governments have long been subsidizing its growth. Actually forcing developers to pay for their developments seems like it might actually go a long way to slowing that trend.

 

On 1/12/2022 at 9:49 AM, shasta said:

It will be very interesting to see how Texas handles President Biden's Infrastructure Bill....so do we ACCEPT the federal funds earmarked for improvements in Texas or do we REJECT the funding out of political pride and grandstanding?

The answer is obvious. We'll take the money because it is our tax dollars too, just like Texas has always taken earmarked dollars, just like every other state. People may heehaw about the billions of dollars in spending that will almost certainly be waisted but they'll take the money all the same and heehaw about it later.

 

On 1/12/2022 at 9:49 AM, shasta said:

Uh...No. We have some of the worst infrastructure and planning of any major world city that claims to be "alpha status".

We desperately need some kind of city plan, or vision, or we will continue to have have haphazard developments , some quality, but surrounded by poor sidewalks, no connectivity, even ditches a block or two over. .....quite pathetic

And yet the city still functions as it should and millions still move here, tens of thousands more coming every year. One wonders why if infrastructure was really that bad.

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On 1/15/2022 at 2:47 AM, Big E said:

Shhhhh....Don't tell him.

 

I actually fail to see how that's a bad thing? Part of the reason suburban sprawl is what is, is because the states and federal governments have long been subsidizing its growth. Actually forcing developers to pay for their developments seems like it might actually go a long way to slowing that trend.

 

The answer is obvious. We'll take the money because it is our tax dollars too, just like Texas has always taken earmarked dollars, just like every other state. People may heehaw about the billions of dollars in spending that will almost certainly be waisted but they'll take the money all the same and heehaw about it later.

 

And yet the city still functions as it should and millions still move here, tens of thousands more coming every year. One wonders why if infrastructure was really that bad.

This may be the most sort-sided response I've ever seen. Yes we have many people moving into the city of Houston but our infrastructure is lagging ...by a lot. We literally have unpaved ditches a quarter mile outside of downtown Houston, we have streets and side walks that are  in very poor condition, for a metro of 7 million + we basically have very few miles of mass transit. And if you state wide, our energy grid wasn't equipped to handle a major weather even like the one we had last February.

And I don't think you understand how Suburban Sprawl works...a city/region can squash suburban sprawl with regional and city plans leading developers to develop a region per an actual plan.

The City of Houston n=has a rejected a city plan multiple times. The truth is...there was a while when the only "federal funds" we aggressively went after was funding to build new freeways...thus encouraging sprawl for developers looking to develop master plan communities and supporting developments.

Very little in Houston is thought our from a Civic standpoint...they are almost all negotiations with developers/ This is NOT the way to create a forward thinking city that matches the charm of the other Alpha cities it desperately wants to be a member of that group. You get a city of nice "pockets" but you also get a lot of third world type infrastructure.

 

 

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1 hour ago, shasta said:

This may be the most sort-sided response I've ever seen. Yes we have many people moving into the city of Houston but our infrastructure is lagging ...by a lot. We literally have unpaved ditches a quarter mile outside of downtown Houston, we have streets and side walks that are  in very poor condition, for a metro of 7 million + we basically have very few miles of mass transit. And if you state wide, our energy grid wasn't equipped to handle a major weather even like the one we had last February.

And I don't think you understand how Suburban Sprawl works...a city/region can squash suburban sprawl with regional and city plans leading developers to develop a region per an actual plan.

The City of Houston n=has a rejected a city plan multiple times. The truth is...there was a while when the only "federal funds" we aggressively went after was funding to build new freeways...thus encouraging sprawl for developers looking to develop master plan communities and supporting developments.

Very little in Houston is thought our from a Civic standpoint...they are almost all negotiations with developers/ This is NOT the way to create a forward thinking city that matches the charm of the other Alpha cities it desperately wants to be a member of that group. You get a city of nice "pockets" but you also get a lot of third world type infrastructure.

 

 

I agree with a lot of what you said but I also want to give credit where credit is due. The city has done a tremendous job in the past 20 years of providing more connectivity to those pockets of walkability. And let's not forget that cities like Los Angeles also exist with poor transit and walkability. We're an alpha city because we have such a massive impact on the economy for our region and beyond. Houston just grew too fast for it to match the infrastructure dollars. At least now we're rebuilding and correcting the errors we made. I'm excited to see how Shepherd and Durham look after construction. The major thoroughfares in this city should be priority for creating walkability and connectivity to neighborhoods and it looks like we're heading that direction. Houston is a great city and it's only getting better. 

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1 hour ago, shasta said:

This may be the most sort-sided response I've ever seen. Yes we have many people moving into the city of Houston but our infrastructure is lagging ...by a lot. We literally have unpaved ditches a quarter mile outside of downtown Houston, we have streets and side walks that are  in very poor condition, for a metro of 7 million + we basically have very few miles of mass transit. And if you state wide, our energy grid wasn't equipped to handle a major weather even like the one we had last February.

And I don't think you understand how Suburban Sprawl works...a city/region can squash suburban sprawl with regional and city plans leading developers to develop a region per an actual plan.

The City of Houston n=has a rejected a city plan multiple times. The truth is...there was a while when the only "federal funds" we aggressively went after was funding to build new freeways...thus encouraging sprawl for developers looking to develop master plan communities and supporting developments.

Very little in Houston is thought our from a Civic standpoint...they are almost all negotiations with developers/ This is NOT the way to create a forward thinking city that matches the charm of the other Alpha cities it desperately wants to be a member of that group. You get a city of nice "pockets" but you also get a lot of third world type infrastructure.

 

 

There is literally nothing wrong with everything you stated lol. If people here do not want to pay for it and are willing to forgo it, what's the problem? Houston is not Boston, New York, or Paris - nor should we attempt to be. Any city you view as a roll model is probably very expensive and unaffordable to most Houston residents. As long as the city is divided into many counties etc, these problems are going to be very hard to address so what is going on is a rational reaction to that. If Harris county funds things that people do not want to pay for, they will go to a county where they can pay less and enjoy the "free" nice things by just driving in. 

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3 hours ago, iah77 said:

There is literally nothing wrong with everything you stated lol. If people here do not want to pay for it and are willing to forgo it, what's the problem? Houston is not Boston, New York, or Paris - nor should we attempt to be. Any city you view as a roll model is probably very expensive and unaffordable to most Houston residents. As long as the city is divided into many counties etc, these problems are going to be very hard to address so what is going on is a rational reaction to that. If Harris county funds things that people do not want to pay for, they will go to a county where they can pay less and enjoy the "free" nice things by just driving in. 

You do realize, Texas (including Houston) has some of the highest property Tax rates in the country....right?

Our tax money should be re-invested to assist and protect our property...they are not!

Every significant rain event leads to flooding. We have some of the worst roads in the country. We have limited connectivity with sidewalks, etc.

Yes, we have made MAJOR strides in the last 20 years but we essentially let to inner city rot for the 100 years before that.

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45 minutes ago, shasta said:

You do realize, Texas (including Houston) has some of the highest property Tax rates in the country....right?

Our tax money should be re-invested to assist and protect our property...they are not!

Every significant rain event leads to flooding. We have some of the worst roads in the country. We have limited connectivity with sidewalks, etc.

Yes, we have made MAJOR strides in the last 20 years but we essentially let to inner city rot for the 100 years before that.

In a typical property tax bill you can see a huge chuck of it (85%+) goes to Harris Health and HISD alone so I think your main problem is with their severe inefficiency and corruption lol? I agree more money should go to infrastructure 

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