Jump to content
Travel_n_Transport

Regent Square: Allen Parkway at Dunlavy

Recommended Posts

Wow, this is great news! Granted the design isn't anything spectacular, but it still creates those neighborhood connections that allow for more walkability. 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My eyes are not seeing a north-south street connecting to Woodhead in this rendering. The original plan had one.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Here is what I can see from the render. Since these guys can't bother to put up a site plan (because they know it will go against what they think is "walkable"):

 

2019 version

 

yZos8lV.jpg

 

 

Previous version:

 

FIS0Iso.jpg

 

Have a guess which is more walkable.

 

For $hits and giggles lets look at Hanover:

 

O6o1Gxd.jpg

 

One knows what they are doing. One sat on their a$$ for a decade and missed the plot, and then need to save face.

 

It would be one thing if the courtyards they are making here were publicly accessible, but I bet they will be private property which doesn't make this development walkable. Now if the reverse is true then this might be interesting, but for a team that took over a decade to do anything, I don't exactly expect them to be that clever.

 

Glad something is happening, but laughably pathetic considering where they started. 

 

EDIT: Made a quick ninja edit.

Edited by Luminare
  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, j_cuevas713 said:

IT'S ALIVE!!! 🧟‍♂️

 

This coupled with Hanover's development, East River, Buffalo Heights District, Lower Heights District, MKT, TMC3, and the Innovation DIstrict. Is it safe to say Houston is about to become a lot more walkable?

 

True. Though disappointed by the final product. What was a deadzone is now all the sudden a neighborhood overnight. Its definitely something unique about this city. Sudden things can sprout quickly.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Luminare said:

 

True. Though disappointed by the final product. What was a deadzone is now all the sudden a neighborhood overnight. Its definitely something unique about this city. Sudden things can sprout quickly.

With GID’s track record, I’ll believe “a neighborhood” is coming when I see framing start to go up.

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is really sad. To look at their early renderings and a neighborhood of 10 -15 story buildings in a mixed use development reduced to two story stucco apartment buildings is really disappointing. They could have left the old apartments that were there and it would be about the same and much lower rents for a while longer.

 

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, bobruss said:

This is really sad. To look at their early renderings and a neighborhood of 10 -15 story buildings in a mixed use development reduced to two story stucco apartment buildings is really disappointing. They could have left the old apartments that were there and it would be about the same and much lower rents for a while longer.

 

 

I mean it is 5 stories, but what was impressive about the last one was the dedication to more "fine grain" development with varying heights. The fact that its more monotonous in height, materials, and volume is pretty bland.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Luminare said:

 

I mean it is 5 stories, but what was impressive about the last one was the dedication to more "fine grain" development with varying heights. The fact that its more monotonous in height, materials, and volume is pretty bland.

 

6 stories, but who's counting?   😉

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/24/2019 at 12:39 PM, jmitch94 said:

What I don't get is how they can afford to sit on all this land, the tax burden must be huge. 

 

Was curious so had to look it up.

 

HCAD just has 5 years of values... but OUCH.

 

3gB7tzh.png

 

2019 is almost $4,000/day in property taxes. 

 

So how much property tax has been "squandered" since 2007? $10 million? 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

This is drastically different than the original layout from 10 years ago. Will this be on the same blocks as those or is this a different block?

 

Image result for regent square houston

Edited by shasta
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, shasta said:

This is drastically different than the original layout from 10 years ago. Will this be on the same blocks as those or is this a different block?

 

Image result for regent square houston

While it is a drastic change, I think we have to consider that GID was probably a little ahead of the game when developing this. Now that there are other developers pulling out all the stops I think they knew they had to make a move from a reputation standpoint. While it isn't as nice, I think all of this is heading the right direction. And remember, this is only Phase 2 of the project, some things may stay the same. 

Edited by j_cuevas713
  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Agh it hurts to look at that rendering. It's so nice. I think had it been built it would've been the hottest place to be in Houston. It reminds me of the Pearl Brewery in San Antonio. I know Houston is forging its own identity, but I wish we had a more downtown SA feel. SA has such a natural and interesting downtown/central area

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, HoustonBoy said:

Agh it hurts to look at that rendering. It's so nice. I think had it been built it would've been the hottest place to be in Houston. It reminds me of the Pearl Brewery in San Antonio. I know Houston is forging its own identity, but I wish we had a more downtown SA feel. SA has such a natural and interesting downtown/central area

I have to respectfully disagree. I went to San Antonio recently and that place is boring. I love what San Antonio is doing outside of the Riverwalk but the Riverwalk itself is outdated imo. They need to revamp that entire area. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, j_cuevas713 said:

I have to respectfully disagree. I went to San Antonio recently and that place is boring. I love what San Antonio is doing outside of the Riverwalk but the Riverwalk itself is outdated imo. They need to revamp that entire area. 

I think the main tourist area of the Riverwalk downtown is outdated as well, but there is a synergy that extends outside of the immediate downtown core that I personally find very attractive. What, if any, city would you like Htown to move towards or take inspiration from?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm excited we still have these towers but are they going for a clash of different architectures?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, Triton said:

I'm excited we still have these towers but are they going for a clash of different architectures?

Different architecture makes it look like the buildings weren't all built at the same time. It helps make it feel more like a natural neighborhood. 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Triton said:

I'm excited we still have these towers but are they going for a clash of different architectures?

I used to think the back of downtown on the convention center side was ugly and old looking

The gleaming 1980s office buildings seemed better

Today it has switched and the older buildings are becoming hotels and getting complementary buildings built to fit in with them

Putting up some contrast seems smart in the long-run

Edited by Timoric
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, SMU1213 said:

Different architecture makes it look like the buildings weren't all built at the same time. It helps make it feel more like a natural neighborhood. 

 

26 minutes ago, Timoric said:

I think different is good - ever tried to match granite on a project to existing?

Good points. Guess it will feel more natural. Hopefully we do actually get those buildings close to the bayou though. Love that older 1920s feel.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, how many new residential/hotel units are we adding along Allen Parkway, in the next 5-10 years?

 

Regent Square- 600 Apartment Units, per article

 

The Allen-  ?# Condo Units

The Allen- ?# Apartments Units

The Allen-  ?# Hotel Rooms

 

Hanover- ?# Apartment Units 

Hanover - ?# Hotel Rooms

 

Ismaili Center- ? Any residential units or hotel rooms as part of this project?

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, shasta said:

So, how many new residential/hotel units are we adding along Allen Parkway, in the next 5-10 years?

 

Regent Square- 600 Apartment Units, per article

 

The Allen-  ?# Condo Units

The Allen- ?# Apartments Units

The Allen-  ?# Hotel Rooms

 

Hanover- ?# Apartment Units 

Hanover - ?# Hotel Rooms

 

Ismaili Center- ? Any residential units or hotel rooms as part of this project?

That is just Phase II of Regent Square. There are two more phases. You also have Wood Partners deal next to Hanover's. And the JLB site that burnt down that is under contract to another apartment developer. The corridor between Allen Pkwy and W Dallas has to have over 3,500 units planned. 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Triton said:

I'm excited we still have these towers but are they going for a clash of different architectures?

 

I think I've said in another thread that "Life is about tradeoffs". Fine-grain development is what we are after at this point, but this will lead to a "clash" of different styles, but this can lead to interesting variations in the environment that would make a walk in this environment more pleasing and interesting. Coarse-grain is also fine in certain instances when you want to holistic and integrated look. At this point we have enough coarse-grain development, and its time to start getting/accepting more variation. At some point we will want to switch back to coarse-grain when the variations get too chaotic to stomach. Normally from my experiences in Europe, fine-grain is great in areas which embrace variations, and non-conformity. They also work well for most situations in a given city (like your typical neighborhood block or street). Coarse-grain is great in areas that are centralized, or areas which are meant to convey a sense of authority or prominence. These areas embrace conformity, and consensus because its more about the integration of the whole rather than the sum of its parts.

Edited by Luminare
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For the next phase, which apparently is heavily office focused, does anyone know the stats on the office market in Houston right now and what trajectory it is headed right now?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

whatever happened to the second tower behind the Sovereign? @SMU1213

 

I imagine if this is phase 2, Phase 3 and 4 are the blocks bound by W. Dallas / Dunlavy / Allen Parkway / Tirrell and the block by the remaining Allen House...  Not sure what phase the 2nd Rochow St tower fits in?..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Avossos said:

whatever happened to the second tower behind the Sovereign? @SMU1213

 

I imagine if this is phase 2, Phase 3 and 4 are the blocks bound by W. Dallas / Dunlavy / Allen Parkway / Tirrell and the block by the remaining Allen House...  Not sure what phase the 2nd Rochow St tower fits in?..

GID designed too expensive of a building so it is on the back burner for now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
On 5/17/2019 at 12:53 PM, wilcal said:

 

Was curious so had to look it up.

 

HCAD just has 5 years of values... but OUCH.

 

3gB7tzh.png

 

2019 is almost $4,000/day in property taxes. 

 

So how much property tax has been "squandered" since 2007? $10 million? 

 

 

Apparently they weren't high enough. 

 

Our valuation system fails to discourage under-development. If instead we had a land-value tax, sites like this would be developed a lot faster (and we'd have a lot fewer surface parking lots downtown).

 

 

 

 

Also, looking for the parking in the rendering and I can't find it.

Edited by Angostura
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

1 hour ago, Angostura said:

 

 

Apparently they weren't high enough. 

 

Our valuation system fails to discourage under-development. If instead we had a land-value tax, sites like this would be developed a lot faster (and we'd have a lot fewer surface parking lots downtown).

 

 

 

 

Also, looking for the parking in the rendering and I can't find it.

 

Why should the government be able to force you to develop something?

 

That's like taxing people who don't study for not "developing" the full potential of their mind lmao.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, iah77 said:

 

 

Why should the government be able to force you to develop something?

 

That's like taxing people who don't study for not "developing" the full potential of their mind lmao.

 

It doesn't seem like anyone is suggesting the government should force anyone to develop something.

 

The idea of property taxes being shifted to more land-based and less improvement-based is not a new concept, or an illiberal concept.  Land is scarce and finite; improvement is not.  Because taxes can be seen as a discouragement to do certain things, it makes sense that it's in the public interest to focus more on taxing the land than the improvement.  The Economist newspaper has advocated for this, too, as I recall.  To avoid vacant properties from increasing sprawl, which makes costs go up for everyone, some jurisdictions charge higher taxes for some vacant properties, too.  This is all a system of encouragement; nobody is forcing anything.

 

The Regent Square property has been a blight on central Houston for a long time now -- a giant fenced off field that is serving no use to anybody, aside from a small amount of vacant-land property taxes being paid.  Perhaps it would make sense for Texas to charge higher property tax rates on vacant or unused urban properties (like Regent Square and the old Holiday Inn downtown) to minimize blight and encourage investment.

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, iah77 said:

 

 

Why should the government be able to force you to develop something?

 

That's like taxing people who don't study for not "developing" the full potential of their mind lmao.

 

 

It's not about forcing anyone to do anything. It's about aligning the incentive structure to favor things we want and disfavor things we don't.

 

Taxing improvements and land equally disincentives investment, and encourages land speculation. As long as land appreciation exceeds the taxes, it can be profitable to sit on vacant land. Even more so if you get some parking revenue on it, which is why so much of the most valuable land in the city (downtown) is used for surface parking.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Angostura said:

 

 

Apparently they weren't high enough. 

 

Our valuation system fails to discourage under-development. If instead we had a land-value tax, sites like this would be developed a lot faster (and we'd have a lot fewer surface parking lots downtown).

 

We already have a land-value tax.  Apparently, you want more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, rechlin said:

It doesn't seem like anyone is suggesting the government should force anyone to develop something.

 

The idea of property taxes being shifted to more land-based and less improvement-based is not a new concept, or an illiberal concept.  Land is scarce and finite; improvement is not.  Because taxes can be seen as a discouragement to do certain things, it makes sense that it's in the public interest to focus more on taxing the land than the improvement.  The Economist newspaper has advocated for this, too, as I recall.  To avoid vacant properties from increasing sprawl, which makes costs go up for everyone, some jurisdictions charge higher taxes for some vacant properties, too.  This is all a system of encouragement; nobody is forcing anything.

 

The Regent Square property has been a blight on central Houston for a long time now -- a giant fenced off field that is serving no use to anybody, aside from a small amount of vacant-land property taxes being paid.  Perhaps it would make sense for Texas to charge higher property tax rates on vacant or unused urban properties (like Regent Square and the old Holiday Inn downtown) to minimize blight and encourage investment.

The Economist over the years had drifted leftwards and I think most people would agree there is no "shortage" of land in Texas. I would argue the opposite, that there is plenty of land and the problem here is improving it. The main cost of most project is the improvements and not the land.  Here we have a labor shortage and now materials have gone up with Trumps tariff along with insurance. The government here subsidizes sprawl via cheap highways and FHA loans which highly favor new homes and almost never fund condos or older homes. 

 

Augostura who is the "we" in what we want? I promise you your ideal city looks very different from mine lol. Is the land truly valuable if the owner has decided to leave it as parking? Most of the city I can guaranty you does not want to work in downtown and I'm not even sure the roads can handle more cars into it at peak hours. Real estate is very cyclical and your idea mainly only functions in an up cycle. Your idea might actually encourage the demolition of historic areas as many times the land value is so high to you it might not justify having a nice historic home on the very valuable lot etc but anyways just playing devils advocate since I don't mind either much. 

 

People don't seem to get that taxes discourage everything period. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Between taxes and pref, developers have plenty of incentive to put shovels in the ground as quickly as possible already. The exceptions are groups that have owned the land for decades (Regent Square) and their cost basis is so low they can afford to be patient or religious institutions (Islamic center) who don't pay taxes and have bottomless bank accounts. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More on  GID Development Group’s Regent Square Phase 2 in Houston.

This is from Globe St published Monday (paywall article, subscription needed):

But here are some of the important parts:



..."The timing for the Regent Square phase two delivery in the first quarter of 2021 has been much anticipated,” Mark Raines, JLL managing director, retail advisory services, tells GlobeSt.com. “The Houston market has been awaiting the type of quality development GID is known to deliver and in a location with retail leasing opportunities that will be desired by many.”

...The retail will ring a central plaza designed by Houston-based OJB Landscape Architecture, which will encompass two activated green spaces, a signature water feature and a pedestrian promenade. Designed by CBT, phase two was conceived as a scaled and site-specific three-dimensional design that will allow residents and visitors to engage with the programmed urban environment.

 

“Our goal for Regent Square is the creation of an exemplary, urban mixed-use district in the heart of Houston. Phase two, the core of the master plan, is poised to establish the project as a dynamic, walkable place as it weaves high-quality restaurants, retail and residential into the fabric of the surrounding neighborhoods,” said James Linsley, president, GID Development Group.

...“JLL is honored to be leasing the retail portion of this game-changing development that will create a key connection between River Oaks and downtown, embracing and complementing adjacent Buffalo Bayou Park with unmatched opportunities for pedestrian-oriented retail and restaurants in this sought-after Inner Loop corridor,” said Matt Parsons, JLL SVP, retail advisory services.


https://www.globest.com/2019/05/20/phase-two-delivery-of-regent-square-is-much-anticipated

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Houston19514 said:

 

We already have a land-value tax.  Apparently, you want more.

 

We currently have a property tax, not a land-value tax. That is, we tax a dollar's worth of land at the same rate as a dollar's worth of improvement. I'd prefer we lower the burden on improvement and raise it on land, but keep the total tax the same.

 

 

16 hours ago, iah77 said:

Angostura who is the "we" in what we want? I promise you your ideal city looks very different from mine lol. Is the land truly valuable if the owner has decided to leave it as parking? Most of the city I can guaranty you does not want to work in downtown and I'm not even sure the roads can handle more cars into it at peak hours. Real estate is very cyclical and your idea mainly only functions in an up cycle. Your idea might actually encourage the demolition of historic areas as many times the land value is so high to you it might not justify having a nice historic home on the very valuable lot etc but anyways just playing devils advocate since I don't mind either much. 

 

People don't seem to get that taxes discourage everything period. 

 

I don't think I'm along in thinking that having a lot of vacant lots in the CBD is not ideal. And there have been enough land transactions in the CBD to indicate that land there is pretty valuable. $15 to 40M per block, it seems. Maybe more in some parts of downtown. (The Chronicle building apparently went for north of $50M.)

 

Our current tax regime has actually been pretty effective at shifting some land in some neighborhoods to higher-value uses. The de-industrialization of the outskirts of the Heights in the last 5-7 years is an example, but the fact that there are so many surface parking lots downtown indicates that we can do better. An office tower on a full city block downtown might be assessed at $300M or so, while the surface lot across the street is assessed at less than a tenth of that. If we assessed both at (the equivalent of) $160M, many of those lots would cease to be vacant.

 

BTW, a lot of those empty lots are owned by a single entity connected to a Taiwanese oil company that seems perfectly content to sit on the land indefinitely. Click around the HCAD parcel map and look for land owned by "Golconda Venture". It's the equivalent of about 11 blocks, all vacant.

 

(W/r/t to demolition of "historic" areas... moo. With a few notable exceptions, most of what we currently call historic preservation is really just density prevention by other means. But that's a discussion for another thread.)

 

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Angostura said:

 

Our current tax regime has actually been pretty effective at shifting some land in some neighborhoods to higher-value uses. The de-industrialization of the outskirts of the Heights in the last 5-7 years is an example, but the fact that there are so many surface parking lots downtown indicates that we can do better. An office tower on a full city block downtown might be assessed at $300M or so, while the surface lot across the street is assessed at less than a tenth of that. If we assessed both at (the equivalent of) $160M, many of those lots would cease to be vacant.

 

So you want a bunch of vacant building instead of a bunch of vacant lots. Because if you do what you are stating, I'd rather build a building and have it be 10% full so I'm bringing in some revenue to offset my taxes that are fixed whether the building is built or not. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Urbannizer said:




From the brochure and website for Regent Square , the mixed use development that is going up in Houston.


 

Vibrant Mix of Uses
 

The community combines a blend of 300,000 square feet of shops and

restaurants, 200,000 square feet of offices, 1,500 residences, and valet and

self-parking spaces for 4,200 vehicles.

 

World-Class Public Spaces
 

Regent Square creates new streets and boulevards, tree-lined sidewalks and promenades, signature parks, and distinctive public spaces.



Exceptional Architecture


A collection of the world’s preeminent architects collaborated to design Regent Square and craft an urban experience that combines traditional architectural styles with elements of contemporary design.



Social Interaction


Regent Square pulses with energy throughout the day and evening as residents, office workers, shoppers, diners, and visitors experience the diverse array of activities and

experiences associated with city life.



Sustainable Development


Adhering to the principles of new urbanism, Regent Square is the largest sustainable development in Houston, and demonstrates a commitment to smart growth, green building, and environmental consciousness.


______________________________________________

 

Block B Retail & Restaurants

Regent Square launches Block B with 50,000 square feet of prime dining and retail real estate for chef-inspired concepts and destination retailers.


Regent Square provides a mix of exceptional retail, restaurant, and entertainment opportunities. A blend of classic and contemporary architecture along tree-lined sidewalks and signature public spaces creates a spectacular backdrop for a day of shopping or a memorable evening out on the town.
 

Regent Square will be the ultimate live, work, play destination, creating the most dynamic shopping, dining, nightlife and entertainment district in Houston.

 

Shopping

 

Shoppers stroll among a collection of national brands, specialty retailers, fashion boutiques, and home and lifestyle stores.



Health and Wellness


Health conscious consumers frequent an array of fitness, spa, and wellness venues focused on the mind, body, and spirit.



Dining and Nightlife


Fine dining, vibrant nightlife, sidewalk cafes, specialty food purveyors and casual restaurants are a non-stop draw.

 

 


Events and Live Entertainment


Evening concerts, outdoor cinema, fashion shows, farmers’ markets, and festivals further enrich Regent Square, making it Houston’s most exciting destination for live entertainment.

.

 

 

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Response said:

It hasn't lost it's coolness.

yes it has

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another 12 years and the dream of Regent Square will be realized (or at least a significantly reduced dream).  

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's right. We need to keep those lots empty for another eternity so that someone else can develop something slightly cooler for our great great grandbrats. 😏

  • Like 2
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I think it’s hilarious how Hanover  is showing GID how it’s done!  Seems like GID has been caught completely flat-footed.

Edited by MarathonMan
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...