Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Thanks for the info! They all did a fantastic job "re-creating" this building. I was only in it briefly but was so impressed with the job they did. It has a very comfortable and open feel to it. Lots of greenery and they kept the wooden floors. Lots of natural light.

I worked in 1000 Main for a while after it was newly built. It looked very nice on the outside but it was so uncomfortable inside. Everybody was getting sick- something to do with construction dust in the air circulation, fumes from the new carpet, etc. Since we couldn't open the windows, we had to breathe the toxic air. Also, the building had a very closed-in feel to it. There was absolutely nothing organic in the building. Everything was metal, plastic and glass. Long narrow rooms with lines of identical cubicles. And most of the offices don't have windows- only the corner ones do. However, the lobby looks very nice. And the building looks nice on the outside. I like the lights on the top.

Anyway, I digress, hopefully others can learn from TMC's example...

please guys?...learn from this?...quit tearing down our history and replacing it with crap?...

Link to post
Share on other sites

I really love what they did with this building- the preservation of history (the Nabisco signs are still up), the modern industrial elements, etc. I wish they'd do more of this around the city!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
Thanks for the info!  They all did a fantastic job "re-creating" this building.  I was only in it briefly but was so impressed with the job they did. It has a very comfortable and open feel to it.  Lots of greenery and they kept the wooden floors.  Lots of natural light.

I worked in 1000 Main for a while after it was newly built.  It looked very nice on the outside but it was so uncomfortable inside. Everybody was getting sick- something to do with construction dust in the air circulation, fumes from the new carpet, etc. Since we couldn't open the windows, we had to breathe the toxic air.  Also, the building had a very closed-in feel to it.  There was absolutely nothing organic in the building. Everything was metal, plastic and glass. Long narrow rooms with lines of identical cubicles.  And most of the offices don't have windows- only the corner ones do. However, the lobby looks very nice.  And the building looks nice on the outside.  I like the lights on the top.

Anyway, I digress, hopefully others can learn from TMC's example...

please guys?...learn from this?...quit tearing down our history and replacing it with crap?...

I agree with you about the nice job TMC did with the old Nabisco complex--even the water tower and the buildings on the back look good. But, 20sgirl, 'learn from TMC's example'? The buildings in the Med center are, for the most part, ghastly. Want an example? Take a look at the new Commons building with its silly seven story waterfall.

And, MD Anderson and the UT board of Trustees want the old Prudential building torn down. TMC, the corporation, who I assume holds title to the land and probably owns the building, should be able to prevent this. MD Anderson says the building is obsolete and it has no use for it even though they have offices spread over many buildings. Costly remod? You bet. MD Anderson is a spectacular research hospital and does a lot that is good for our city but I don't think that should give them carte blanche to destroy a neighborhood landmark such as this to put up another 'stairway to heaven' thing like that that's just opened next door. If TMC wants to tear something down, why not that titanic parking garage that spans Bertner along Holcombe and completely blocks views from that heavily traveled thoroughfare into the main campus. It even obscures one of its few stellar buildings, the newish Texas Heart Institute.

Nostalgia notwithstanding, that Prudential building, at 50 plus years old, will bite the dust like the old Shamrock Hotel, part of which survives to this day. Parking garages are forever

Link to post
Share on other sites
Hey - I like that waterfall...

Glen

Sorry Glen. I can see why you might like it. No wish to offend your sensibilities. It's better at night and it's better when it's on--which, unfortunately, is not most of the time. That building, which btw has a great restaurant on top, is, however. singularly unesthetic and an eyesore (ok, imo) located as it is in the geographic center of the main campus of one of Houston's best assets. Surely we who work there, live in the neighborhood and do the bus-to-train transfer in front of it (me) deserve better. Incidentally, the building houses a garage and many fast food restaurants. Its interior is as bland and unexceptinal as its exterior. The one caveat is the elegant and tony Treviso's restaurant on the top floor, which, imo, is one of the most beautiful restaurant interiors in Houston.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm with Glen.  I like that waterfall (it's unfortunate that it is not consistently operating), and I like the whole building, especially considering that it is primarily a parking garage.  I think it was a creative and splendid way to "hide" a parking garage.

OK, a waterfall on a parking garage is an innovative and welcome site. But, that building is meant to be the 'student center' for a part of the med center 'campus' that sorely needed some services not readily available. The 'Commons', as it is called, was a much-discussed project because of its prominent location. It was intended to be a building for fast food, light retail, banking, meetings and a high-end restaurant. Of course, parking was an issue so the businesses would not have to depend solely on pedestrian traffic, and parking was included in the plan like in the St. Luke's Professional building between Main and Fannin. The building does look like a splendid parking garage though. (I don't mean that sarcastically.)

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 9 years later...

This topic may be old news but it's new to this new member of HAIF. As a native Houstonian and second generation employee of the cracker factory I'm thrilled to find it. I was even there when the last RITZ cracker came off the oven in '99.

I was not part of the demo crew that removed all of the equipment but was fortunate enough to visit twice after the new construction was in progress.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 5 years later...
  • 1 month later...
  • 2 weeks later...
  • Highrise Tower changed the title to John P. McGovern Campus
  • 6 months later...
  • 10 months later...
  • Highrise Tower changed the title to Texas Medical Center John P. McGovern Campus

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...


×
×
  • Create New...