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Big Mod on Montrose...


BenH

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Has anyone seen the big mod being built on Montrose just past the stop sign if you're heading towards the medical center? It's in the circle where the fountain is. Who's designing it? There won't be any pictures for this one.

Why not? I think it's cool. My only concern would be how all that exposed wood is going to react to weathering.

I work nearby and I could probably walk over and get a picture.

Marty

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Are you talking about the house that is in Shadyside facing the fountain? It is a really great house and I love it when a modern house is built in a mature neighborhood with classical houses, as long as they do not compete with what is already there. This house does a nice job at that, I think.

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Are you talking about the house that is in Shadyside facing the fountain? It is a really great house and I love it when a modern house is built in a mature neighborhood with classical houses, as long as they do not compete with what is already there. This house does a nice job at that, I think.

That's the house. I'm just trying to find out who designed it. I couldn't get any pictures the other day because the house is a long ways away from where I live, plus my point and shoot camera needs a recharge.

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That house by the Mecum Fountain at Montrose was designed (or designed for) by a man named Robertson. His granddaddy was (I think) the original owner of the million $ property where a hugh 50s brick rambler once stood. I'm not sure whether or not that was the original house on the lot as Shadyside was one of Houston's earliest suburbs. I believe the grandpa was a wildcatter named Cullen or maybe Cullinan. I don't know if Robertson designed the one under construction next door on Montrose.

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Guess I'll weigh in with my pictures. At least I wasn't talking on the cell when I took them. :closedeyes:

PC160011.jpg

PC160010.jpg

PC160009.jpg

Tony, your information is basically correct, with a couple of things: J.S. Cullinan, one of the founders of Texaco, developed Shadyside. His house, named "Shadyside" was eventually the home of Oveta Culp Hobby. When Mrs. Hobby moved out in 1974, the house was demolished and the lot stood empty for about twenty years. About 1998 or so two Spanish Mediterranean style new houses, visible from Main Street, were built on the lot. (Hugh Roy _Cullen's_ house is at 1620 River Oaks. It's a limestone-faced villa, now much expanded, which also used to belong to Oscar and Lynn Wyatt.) The large one-story ranch style house was behind the Cullinan lot; I believe it belonged to the Stahlman family (of Stahlman Lumber). That is the site of the Robertson house, and maybe another house or service building, too. I can really tell that the ground floor is based around the fountain view; hope they don't throw any stones!

Marty

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  • 2 weeks later...
Cool!

Kevin Dahlstrand is a former co-worker of mine who went out on his own. He does awesome work.

Now, if I could just get inside to see that house!

Miller Dahlstrand seems to be working on the more traditional house next to the Robertson House.

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  • 1 month later...
  • 6 months later...

The house is owned by Christopher's parents. Christopher is now on is own here in Houston under Robertson Design (as you saw from the link).

He is an amazing architect and has unbelievable range. From the grandeur of his parents home to the "affordable" houses he did while still at KRDB (They were published in Dwell a few years ago with the Cedar Street project.)

My business partner and I have been working with Christopher for two years to design efficient spaces using Shipping Containers as exterior structure. He is truly one of the most gifted men I've ever known. We broke ground yesterday on the Cordell House, an 1858 sq ft. single family residence using Shipping Containers, Structural Insulated Panels and many other green products. The house will be LEED certified platinum. Due to the modular nature of the design, we are scheduled to complete the house by Thanksgiving. We are incredibly excited about bringing this vision to fruition.

Our website is in its infancy, but if you are a fan of Christopher's work, please check our progress (We'll be quadrupling content over the next month.) and/or come visit us at the jobsite.

www.numendevelopment.com

Katie Nichols

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The house is owned by Christopher's parents. Christopher is now on is own here in Houston under Robertson Design (as you saw from the link).

He is an amazing architect and has unbelievable range. From the grandeur of his parents home to the "affordable" houses he did while still at KRDB (They were published in Dwell a few years ago with the Cedar Street project.)

My business partner and I have been working with Christopher for two years to design efficient spaces using Shipping Containers as exterior structure. He is truly one of the most gifted men I've ever known. We broke ground yesterday on the Cordell House, an 1858 sq ft. single family residence using Shipping Containers, Structural Insulated Panels and many other green products. The house will be LEED certified platinum. Due to the modular nature of the design, we are scheduled to complete the house by Thanksgiving. We are incredibly excited about bringing this vision to fruition.

Our website is in its infancy, but if you are a fan of Christopher's work, please check our progress (We'll be quadrupling content over the next month.) and/or come visit us at the jobsite.

www.numendevelopment.com

Katie Nichols

I cannot tell you how excited that I am to see this going on in our area. I am a design student, and this is the kind of work that really inspires me. I'm planning on getting my LEED certification as soon as I can. Kudos to you, I will be following your project [probably obsessively.]

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The house is owned by Christopher's parents. Christopher is now on is own here in Houston under Robertson Design (as you saw from the link).

He is an amazing architect and has unbelievable range. From the grandeur of his parents home to the "affordable" houses he did while still at KRDB (They were published in Dwell a few years ago with the Cedar Street project.)

My business partner and I have been working with Christopher for two years to design efficient spaces using Shipping Containers as exterior structure. He is truly one of the most gifted men I've ever known. We broke ground yesterday on the Cordell House, an 1858 sq ft. single family residence using Shipping Containers, Structural Insulated Panels and many other green products. The house will be LEED certified platinum. Due to the modular nature of the design, we are scheduled to complete the house by Thanksgiving. We are incredibly excited about bringing this vision to fruition.

Our website is in its infancy, but if you are a fan of Christopher's work, please check our progress (We'll be quadrupling content over the next month.) and/or come visit us at the jobsite.

www.numendevelopment.com

Katie Nichols

I'd love to see any renderings and floor plans you'd be willing to show. I'm a builder myself and I've been looking for someone in town who can design such a space (I've been talking to a couple of architects and designers in California who have done it before, but I was not really enjoying the relationship).

Welcome to the forum btw.

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Another big thanks for your post and sharing your website/plans. I'm not a builder, architect or designer but have been researching work with shipping containers. My partner and I are seriously considering it for our next (and probably last) home (like your project, small--under 2,000 sg ft.) Welcome and keep us posted!

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Thanks for all the great replies. This is truly our passion and we are thrilled to finally be making it a reality. We are a small shop and so it may take us a while to upload the full content to our website. I will post here when we add pictures/renderings/etc.

Here are a few links to photos from the art gallery that we completed last month (it is designed to be dismantled, moved, and reassembled with less than 5% material waste) and some photos of the Cordell House during fabrication. The gallery was built during the crazy stretch of rain this summer (thus the tarps, plastic, etc. in the photos). Another plus to building modularly, we were able to open the gallery 54 days after permit despite the fact that 39 of them were significant rain days that would shut down a traditional jobsite. These are not PR ready by any stretch, but they are a great raw glimpse of what we've been doing.

Apama Mackey Gallery - 628 E. 11th Street

http://kylewalkerphotography.com/numendev_gallery/

http://www.kylewalkerphotography.com/numendev_gallery2/

Cordell House

http://kylewalkerphotography.com/numen/091307numen.zip

The Cordell House will also be featured in Houston House and Home next month.

Again, thanks for the encouragement and have an amazing day!

Kt.

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I gotta admit, I have mixed feelings about using storage containers for a house in a neighborhood. I mean, I think the idea is cool and I like how quickly and efficiently they can be done, but I think my feelings would change if my neighbor across the street tore down their house and put 3 containers on the lot.

flipper

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Flipper,

I think your concern is very valid. In fact, I think the same argument can be made for any style of architecture that is incongruent with its immediate surroundings. John and I are adamant about honoring the existing setting for every project we pursue. For that reason, the Cordell House is going in on the edge of a traditional bungalow neighborhood, but across the street from a large industrial building. It actually provides a great segue from the industrial presence into the bungalows.

The design is single story for this reason.

Although there will be people who simply don't like Cordell House because of its modern aesthetic, I think those with your concerns will be delighted by the design.

Ultimately, if an individual wants to create an efficient, sustainable structure in a neighborhood where the original container exterior would be disruptive (regardless of how well it's presented), he/she could clad the containers to look like almost anything - even a traditional bungalow. Clearly, this sacrifices some of the efficiency of this style of construction, but allows you to preserve the integrity of the community in which you're building.

I would consider this as much a social courtesy as a design consideration. I think lots of folks have that initial reaction to containers and I appreciate your comments.

-Kt.

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  • 3 weeks later...
Word on the street is that this house is in next month's issue of Metropolitan Home.

See current issue of Metropolitan Home for interior images and text concerning the owners son/architect. Also, it's worth your effort to pick up issue 75 of "Tribeza". Pieces on Houston Mod, Stephen Fox and the cover story of the Herb Paseur designed Museum District home (very nice restoration efforts).

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