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Fairmont Museum District On Dunlavy: Phase III, 12-Stories


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I have lived at the Fairmont for years now, they said that Phase III is on hold due to the steel tariffs, they own both of the small properties behind however, and contract a company to manage them. N

12-stories, September start date. Someone mind posting tinge article?   https://www.bizjournals.com/houston/news/2019/03/24/montrose-apartments-could-add-new-12-story-tower.html?iana=hpmvp_h

Demolition permits by Cherry.

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Does anyone know what is planned for the large tract at the former site of Houston Community College on Richmond at Dunlavy? Who is the developer?

actually it was an hisd building and joseph marom (sp?) is the developer. he purchased two adjacent apartment complexes and has a total of +/- 7 acres. he intends to do a mixed-use development with retail and apartments.

hes also doing the deal on san felipe (former regency arms apartment complex).

Edited by houston-development
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http://www.globest.com/news/802_802/houston/151420-1.html

Last updated: December 14, 2006 02:14am

Local Developer Begins 236-Unit Phase I

By Amy Wolff Sorter

HOUSTON-Following receipt of a $26 million construction/permanent loan, local developer Long Reach Associates Ltd., operating under the name Dunlavy Development Phase I LLC, launched construction on the first phase of its Fairmont Museum District. The 236-unit first phase is anticipated for completion in late 2007 or early 2008.

The project is situated on 2.7 acres at 4310 Dunlavy St. and Live Oak Capital Ltd. Production officer Jim Kirkpatrick tells GlobeSt.com that decision on a second phase will take place once plans are firmer for the Houston's Metro rail line. "Depending on what Metro does, there may be a retail component in the second phase, along with residential," says Kirkpatrick, who helped obtain $26 million in financing for the project's first phase.

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Oh yeah, and I forgot - do you guys think this could affect the planned development at Wilshire Village just a couple of blocks away? I haven't heard anything about it in a while, but was just curious...not sure the area can take both

The Wilshire Village deal seems sort of dead in the water, anyway...

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steinberg designed it...i'm not too impressed with their other stuff (the calais, ventana, left bank, etc).

seems like standard run of the mill complexes

it would be awesome if someone could get their hands on wilshire village and "purty it up."

such a neat place, especially in terms of complexes... such a shame it is in its current condition

Edited by sevfiv
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I ate at La Tapatia for lunch yesterday, and took a walk around the "Fairmont" project. There was a lot of activity....10-15 trucks, land clearing, massive pipes, etc.....and I was surprised there had not been more activity on this message board. This is a large peice of land in a prime location with the potential to make a large impact in the area's redevelopment.

Tapatia alone should make it one of the more sought after properties in town......

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I'd like to know more about this as well, since it's right around the corner from where I live. I hope it's going to be nice!

At least now that they're working on it it won't be a mosquito breeding ground like it was last summer. The empty lot had bad drainage and was basically a large swamp!

Edited by Jax
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What are they building at Mandell and Richmond nect to the Dog park? Large support pillars are in place now. I did a search and did not find any topics on this project.

Do you mean Richmond and Dunlavy? They're building an apartment complex there...there's a thread on it somewhere

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Is this the site?

Yep. I was over there a few days ago at a cousin's house. we walked over and walked around. she said that the underground parking will be interesting since dunlavy floods. hopefully the sump pumps will be working if required.

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"'Depending on what Metro does, there may be a retail component in the second phase, along with residential," says Kirkpatrick, who helped obtain $26 million in financing for the project's first phase.'"

Do you guys think that means, "whether or not rail goes by at all" or does that mean "whether or not there is a stop close by"? Maybe both.

I drive past this place daily, and the pictures do not do it justice; this place looks HUGE. A complex this size should do much to improve the commercial appeal of the area.

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I drive past this place daily, and the pictures do not do it justice; this place looks HUGE. A complex this size should do much to improve the commercial appeal of the area.

Is there a rendering anywhere? I thought maybe there had been one when the project was first announced, but I can't seem to find one...

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"'Depending on what Metro does, there may be a retail component in the second phase, along with residential," says Kirkpatrick, who helped obtain $26 million in financing for the project's first phase.'"

Do you guys think that means, "whether or not rail goes by at all" or does that mean "whether or not there is a stop close by"? Maybe both.

I drive past this place daily, and the pictures do not do it justice; this place looks HUGE. A complex this size should do much to improve the commercial appeal of the area.

that quote is from 2006 when rail could have gone parallel to 59. metro has chosen richmond since then. not sure if it will improve commercial appeal, richmond already has that.

Edited by musicman
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Do you guys think that means, "whether or not rail goes by at all" or does that mean "whether or not there is a stop close by"? Maybe both.

There is supposed to be a Metro stop at Richmond and Dunlavy, so I imagine they will go ahead with the retail phase once the residential phase is complete.

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Is there a rendering anywhere? I thought maybe there had been one when the project was first announced, but I can't seem to find one...

I can't even find a website for the company.

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Tower of Traffic!

From what I read, the Ashby highrise would have 226 units. This monster has 236. Since this is being constructed on the south end of the block, bordering Ervan Chew Park, I suspect the ingress/egress will be on little 2-lane Dunlavy near Castle Court. Where are bumper stickers for this baby?

This thing will dump people along a residential road south to Bissonet or north toward Allen Parkway. Will there be an appreciable difference in traffic? I don't know. But I do think this proves Ashby is nothing about the number of people and all about the height/scale.

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But I do think this proves Ashby is nothing about the number of people and all about the height/scale.

I think it's more about the money those people have and their political connections and influence.

Go to Ashby's website. They have plenty of argument to back up what they say is true.

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there are several key differences b/w this dev and ashby:

1) It won't be 23 stories

2) It is bounded immediately on four sides by a park and the freeway; a four lane road, which will eventually, if metro is to be believed, be four lanes plus light rail; retail; and a lot of rental accommodation. Renters for the most part tend to care less than owners about developments in their 'hood since they don't have a mortgage invested in it, and in a few years will likely be elsewhere.

Contrast this with Ashby, plonked incongruously in the middle of a bunch of two lane streets (sometimes not even that with on-street parking) and a bunch of single family homes with hefty mortgages sunk into them and I, at least, get a sense of the reason for the difference in attitudes to the projects.

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Homeowners in this area, and I am one, bought realizing this area wasn't going to sustain single family homes forever. We bought 20 years ago hoping our investment would increase as the area became more ameniable to multi-family homes and apartments and eventually mass transit. This is probably the only affordable area close to downtown and on the west side.

P.S. I also live on my property.

Edited by missmsry
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^^^ Yeah, I sensed that about the area. Good to hear it confirmed.

I live in the area as well, and I'm actually pretty excited about these apartments - congestion aside, it's a heck of a lot better than the barren wasteland it was for a while there, and maybe the influx of people will help local businesses...and you thought La Tapatia was crowded late-night before? If nearby Wilshire Village is eventually (ever?) torn down to make room for apartments/condos, though, I can definitely see traffic becoming an even bigger issue

All that aside, it seems that the area is in a pretty slow reversal of rental back to ownership through tear-downs

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I live in the area as well, and I'm actually pretty excited about these apartments - congestion aside, it's a heck of a lot better than the barren wasteland it was for a while there, and maybe the influx of people will help local businesses...and you thought La Tapatia was crowded late-night before? If nearby Wilshire Village is eventually (ever?) torn down to make room for apartments/condos, though, I can definitely see traffic becoming an even bigger issue

All that aside, it seems that the area is in a pretty slow reversal of rental back to ownership through tear-downs

I live of off Dunlavy and I really don't have a problem with them. In the grand scheme of things, it's not that many more people. But it kind of amuses me that 226 units in that neighborhood at the South end of Dunlavy freaked out the world, but 236 units on Dunlavy at the north end (almost by a hair) of the same neighborhood didn't merit mention. And nothing was said when rice built 140 graduate apartments.The fact is that lots of people will be taking Dunlavy from or toward Bissonet from Fairmont, and later to and from Regent Square. I think the traffic impact of Ashby would be relatively minimal and it's a matter of having 25 stories there.

Dunlavy is destined to become a more heavily travelled road regardless of Ashby because it is the only road between Shepherd and Montrose that runs from Bissonet to Allen Parkway. Add Regent Square to the North, and these places to the South, and it will only get busier.

The Fairmont ingress/egress will be interesting though. Metro tends to frown on left turns across its tracks (and isn't a station going to be there?), so turning left on Richmond, across 4 lanes and a rail line will be dicey. I think they'll put people out on Dunlavy or be right turn only on Richmond.

But at the end of the day, I've lived here for years and I'm not leaving. I agree with the earlier poster that this kind of density is to be expected.

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I used to live in that area, and i had to walk past that barren swampy mosquito infested wasteland every time I went out to eat on Richmond, so I too think its a good thing that this apartment building is going up. There are very few nice rental options in the area, the nicest I can think of is Richmond Square, which isn't saying much. And yes, it's very close to Southampton, just across the bridge over the 59. It should be interesting once the Metro line is running. I would consider moving back into the Hood.

I wonder how "luxury" this place is going to be...

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Nope, it was gone before I moved to Houston.

I remember the water used to drain slowly from the swampy wasteland over the sidewalk and it caused algae to grow on this one part of the sidewalk, which made it extremely slippery. I ended up walking in the street after the first time I fell. :)

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Nope, it was gone before I moved to Houston.

I remember the water used to drain slowly from the swampy wasteland over the sidewalk and it caused algae to grow on this one part of the sidewalk, which made it extremely slippery. I ended up walking in the street after the first time I fell. :)

thank the current owners. HCC sold out to them.

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I live of off Dunlavy and I really don't have a problem with them. In the grand scheme of things, it's not that many more people. But it kind of amuses me that 226 units in that neighborhood at the South end of Dunlavy freaked out the world, but 236 units on Dunlavy at the north end (almost by a hair) of the same neighborhood didn't merit mention.

23 stories has an emotional impact that a midrise spread over a wider area does not. one is appropriate for its immediate surrounding area (situated on a major east west artery), the other is not and in anywhere other than Houston, would get no further than the back of a developer's envelope.

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23 stories has an emotional impact that a midrise spread over a wider area does not. one is appropriate for its immediate surrounding area (situated on a major east west artery), the other is not and in anywhere other than Houston, would get no further than the back of a developer's envelope.

I'm with you about appropriateness. Things like scale and style matter. And that's what Ashby is really about. But everyone falls back on traffic because this is Houston and nobody wants to admit aesthetics count. I would just like to see more people admit that the it's more about the Tower than the Traffic. It's about sitting on your back porch and seeing 20 stories where the sky used to be. A broader discussion (not necessarily on this board, we've done that) of the city's power regarding scale and style would be interesting to say the least.

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I drove by this project yesterday and it is coming along quickly. It even appears that they will using brick for the entire facade............a welcome change from the usual stucco or plank siding.

Oddly enough, I think the biggest impact of the Fairmont development is the looming chaos of the adjoining dog park. The dog park was packed yesterday and it is going to be crazy when residents of the development move in.

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I drove by this project yesterday and it is coming along quickly. It even appears that they will using brick for the entire facade............a welcome change from the usual stucco or plank siding.

Oddly enough, I think the biggest impact of the Fairmont development is the looming chaos of the adjoining dog park. The dog park was packed yesterday and it is going to be crazy when residents of the development move in.

From what you could tell, is front of the complex going to be set back to where it appears now? Or is that really the middle of the complex? I've only seen one rendering of it, and it was pretty low quality... If they've still got to build more units up to Richmond, it might be a while yet before they're finished

The brick is good news, but the final look of this place is a mystery... My big hope is that it will lead to a clean up (removal) of some of those rough complexes along that strip of Richmond

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It is a sketchy part of Richmond all right. As development progresses one would hope it won't turn into another Greenway Plaza - all big setbacks, landscaping, parking garages and glass facades, discouraging pedestrian traffic. The area is currently walkable, with some retail, bars and restaurants, just not very attractive - the sidewalks in general are in a terrible state. Here' s hoping the light rail, when they get round to it, spurs a renewed approach. The pace of development along the Main St line hardly makes one particularly sanguine though!

Edited by sidegate
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It is a sketchy part of Richmond all right. As development progresses one would hope it won't turn into another Greenway Plaza - all big setbacks, landscaping, parking garages and glass facades, discouraging pedestrian traffic. The area is currently walkable, with some retail, bars and restaurants, just not very attractive - the sidewalks in general are in a terrible state. Here' s hoping the light rail, when they get round to it, spurs a renewed approach. The pace of development along the Main St line hardly makes one particularly sanguine though!

The light rail - if/when it comes - will no doubt give the infrastructure around there a much needed boost, at least aesthetically. At the cost of no left turns anywhere, of course :) I'm hoping this new complex helps cleans things up and ultimately leads to something happening with Wilshire Village and that shopping center across the street. I only live a few blocks away, but have only been inside that Fiesta once

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I only live a few blocks away, but have only been inside that Fiesta once

you're missing out.

The dog park was packed yesterday and it is going to be crazy when residents of the development move in.

maybe the city will claim eminent domain to help the situation.

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From what you could tell, is front of the complex going to be set back to where it appears now? Or is that really the middle of the complex? I've only seen one rendering of it, and it was pretty low quality... If they've still got to build more units up to Richmond, it might be a while yet before they're finished

The brick is good news, but the final look of this place is a mystery... My big hope is that it will lead to a clean up (removal) of some of those rough complexes along that strip of Richmond

The scoop is this: the project everyone is referring to is simply Phase I. Phase II is a mirror image of Phase I but fronting Richmond...and housing another 230+/- units. There is also a Phase III planned as the developer owns everything (including the two apartments left standing on the corner of Woodhead and Portsmouth) with the exception of the La Tapatia strip center and the homes . Phase III (if constructed) will front Woodhead with entrances and exits on Woodhead. The developer is seeking abandonment of Portsmouth east of Woodhead to make the evil plan work. Problem: I hear the neighborhood is putting up a fight because one of the existing apartment complexes (4403 Woodhead) is apparently deed restricted meaning if it were ever to be demolished any future redevelopment would be required to conform to the restrictions = single family residential. Although I am not familiar with whether or not the Ashby High Rise Ordinance has been voted into law, one would assume these developers would be forced to conduct a traffic study and get the blessing of the City of Houston before being given any future building permits for a Phase II or III. They might want to keep the neighbors happy. 730+/- units could easily & will likely create a traffic nightmare for everyone in that area. The surrounding neighborhood streets (most of which are single family residential) will undoubtedly need to put forward a petition for permit parking. Neighbors are also lobbying for the city to purchase the vacated apartment next to the dog park owned by the Aids Foundation in an effort to expand the park. If the city purchases the property and razes it they could also eliminate a portion of Norfolk that dead ends into the dog park. Given the number of soon-to-be future residents and the erosion of permeable cover, expansion of the park seems like a pretty decent idea. But given the tract record of our great city it will likely never come to fruition.

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Neighbors are also lobbying for the city to purchase the vacated apartment next to the dog park owned by the Aids Foundation in an effort to expand the park. If the city purchases the property and razes it they could also eliminate a portion of Norfolk that dead ends into the dog park.

Thanks for the info. I didn't know that AFH had vacated the Norfolk property.

Link to listing here.

1715 - 1717 Norfolk

This is a cash transaction to AIDS Foundation Houston. This property is located in the Richwood Place subdivision which is deed restricted. A copy of the restrictive convenants is available upon request. The site can be used for single family construction, but not multi-family. The property is currently improved with a small, 20 unit apartment/group home facility. Selling the property for land value only.

Asking price: $1.5M

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  • Highrise Tower changed the title to Fairmont Museum District On Dunlavy: Phase III, 12-Stories

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