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Bridgeland Will Bring 65,000 Residents To Northwest Area


mrfootball

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Question: If these subdivisions have no perceivable value, then why do people buy homes there? Without a gun being pointed at their head? To me, that seems to indicate that somebody values them.

Not to take sides in the debate going on (which I'm not following), I just wanted to focus on the particular sentence quoted above, because it touches upon a philosophical point which has been on my mind from another thread.

Let's say a community gets built which is just plain senseless and would poorly suit anyone who could afford to live there. Would there be any demand for this community?

1. People have to live somewhere. There are only so many houses. In theory, if all the builders in a town made crummy houses (like the Model T Fords all painted black), people would still have to buy them.

2. There are only so many houses on the market at any given time. If all the good ones get snapped up, that leaves only the bad ones for the late birds. If you buy in the late summer or early fall, for example, you may be looking at the "scraps" that have been "picked over".

3. If you're in the market to buy a home, you usually have a narrow window of opportunity before you're forced to make a decision. If that window closes, you're forced to sign a 12-month contract on a rental unit and put your stuff into storage.

4. If a real estate can "sell" it, that doesn't mean that it actually provides any value to the buyer. It just means that the buyer perceived value at the time of purchase. The buyer and his family may have been better off living in a cardboard box under a freeway overpass. There is no eOpinions.Com for the real estate market (of which I am aware). From my experience, real estate agents aren't always exactly honest.

5. Sellers have cost margins that must be covered or they simply can't sell. If you haven't built much equity in your house, or if you have unpaid home equity loans, you can't sell for much less than you owe on the house. Or you have to reach into your pocket at closing ("upside down"). If you don't have savings or convertible assets, you'll let the house sit on the market for as long as it takes until a buyer comes along who will pay the break-even amount.

6. Once you buy a home, you can't return it. And you usually can't sell it someone else for at least a few years. So you learn to live with it the best you can. It's amazing what people will put up with if they have no choice.

7. When people shop around for a house, they don't exhaust all options. There is always something potentially better that remains unseen. No one has the time to look at hundreds or thousands of houses. People are lazy. Many buyers look at fewer than a couple dozen houses, all in the same couple neighborhoods, before they decide to buy. Many buyers don't even use the Internet. Some buyers buy on homes that they've seen on the Internet...without ever actually looking at them in person.

8. Homebuyers aren't always that smart. The criteria they use to buy homes often has no bearing on what value the home would actually provide them in real life. Some buyers must have a fireplace. Or must have a white house with columns. A lot of it is emotion. Emotion is the strongest influence in making any decision.

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Not to take sides in the debate going on (which I'm not following), I just wanted to focus on the particular sentence quoted above, because it touches upon a philosophical point which has been on my mind from another thread.

Let's say a community gets built which is just plain senseless and would poorly suit anyone who could afford to live there. Would there be any demand for this community?

No. Not in a competitive market.

1. People have to live somewhere. There are only so many houses. In theory, if all the builders in a town made crummy houses (like the Model T Fords all painted black), people would still have to buy them.

In a monopoly, this is true. In reality, however, the big production homebuilders are very similar to car manufacturers. In order to keep costs down, they only produce so many models. If they feel that they can capture a sufficiently larger market share by introducing a new model, that's what they'll do, right up to the point that the costs of providing new models fail to result in greater benefits [Marginal Revenue = Marginal Cost].

2. There are only so many houses on the market at any given time. If all the good ones get snapped up, that leaves only the bad ones for the late birds. If you buy in the late summer or early fall, for example, you may be looking at the "scraps" that have been "picked over".

In competitive markets with no barriers to entry, builders will 1) research their market to determine consumer preferences, and 2) always have something either available or in the pipeline.

3. If you're in the market to buy a home, you usually have a narrow window of opportunity before you're forced to make a decision. If that window closes, you're forced to sign a 12-month contract on a rental unit and put your stuff into storage.

No. Go month-to-month on the lease. That's very common.

4. If a real estate can "sell" it, that doesn't mean that it actually provides any value to the buyer. It just means that the buyer perceived value at the time of purchase.

There's no accounting for stupid buyers. Fortunately for the stupid, what might be objectively expected to make someone happy isn't always the case. If they were stupid enough to buy it, they might just be stupid enough to appreciate and value it. Who are you to tell them that they aren't happy with their purchase? Or maybe they aren't stupid at all and just have a different set of preferences.

5. Sellers have cost margins that must be covered or they simply can't sell. If you haven't built much equity in your house, or if you have unpaid home equity loans, you can't sell for much less than you owe on the house. Or you have to reach into your pocket at closing ("upside down"). If you don't have savings or convertible assets, you'll let the house sit on the market for as long as it takes until a buyer comes along who will pay the break-even amount.

Yep, well that's a problem that plagues most categories of investment. Doesn't matter whether it is production housing, classic cars, expensive art, or an architectural masterpeice. Poor investment skills often result in financial distress. Is that the builders' fault?

6. Once you buy a home, you can't return it. And you usually can't sell it someone else for at least a few years. So you learn to live with it the best you can. It's amazing what people will put up with if they have no choice.

They did have a choice. They could've rented or financed it with a lender that would allow for the mortgage to be retired early. This is another case where poor investment skills often result in financial distress. Is that the builders' fault?

7. When people shop around for a house, they don't exhaust all options. There is always something potentially better that remains unseen. No one has the time to look at hundreds or thousands of houses. People are lazy. Many buyers look at fewer than a couple dozen houses, all in the same couple neighborhoods, before they decide to buy. Many buyers don't even use the Internet. Some buyers buy on homes that they've seen on the Internet...without ever actually looking at them in person.

Again, is this somehow the builders' fault?

8. Homebuyers aren't always that smart. The criteria they use to buy homes often has no bearing on what value the home would actually provide them in real life. Some buyers must have a fireplace. Or must have a white house with columns. A lot of it is emotion. Emotion is the strongest influence in making any decision.

If they feel good about their purchase, what's the problem? See response to #4.

It never ceases to amaze me that as a society, we try to teach high schoolers chemistry, physics, calculus, and literature, but we fail to teach them basic skills for living, like personal finance.

Edited by TheNiche
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Sorry, I needed to catch up on this thread...

99.2% of homes in The Woodlands are the same types of homes you'll find in the other Houston suburbs (ie. Spring, Klein, Cypress, Katy, Kingwood, etc).

Is this true about the older sections of The Woodlands as well as the newer sections? In the older sections, there's all kinds of Life Forms Homes and Jerry Kirkpatrick homes and all kinds of other custom-built homes.

My God, that's disgusting!! More banal crap even further from the core of the city. I might understand a decision to live in such mediocrity if one works in that area (within 2-3 miles from home). But, otherwise, why perpetuate this type of sickening sprawl??

I'm sure the type of person that will actually want to live in this will drive their "SUV" (please say with a strong southern drawl to get maximum effect) spitting "chewin 'backy" out of the window as they suck gallon upon gallon of fuel and spew ozone-causing pollutants into the beautiful 290 corridor! I'm gonna go throw up...

I'm going to start a new thread about sprawl for you.

Is that the builders' fault?

I wasn't thinking about the builders. But we can start a new thread under Real Estate if you want to continue this interesting discussion. You make a good point about the competition on the sellers' side, but I wonder just how efficient the real estate markets are in Houston.

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Also, just because you do not like it or do not want it, doesn't mean nobody else gets to. How much housing do you think there is inside the loop? Definitely not enough to shove all of the suburbanites into it. Plus, just because you live in the Houston area, does not mean you work downtown. And, as others have said many a time, those of us with kids appreciate the value of a good, quality education and are willing to "sacrifice" to give our kids every advantage possible.

I have never understood opponents of sprawl given our countries history of western expansion and free choice/will. Without it, we would all be living 3 miles up on a little island in NYC. No thank you, I like my backyard, my fence, my trees and my freedom to choose to do whatever it is I want.

So where will your kids go? Where is your evidence for detrimental effects on society?

The biggest problem with this country is overpopulation. It's unfortunate that Houston, where I live, is still growing at a fast pace, while it was already the 4th largest city in the U.S. If Bridgeland considered itself a neighborhood in Waller, TX, I wouldn't complain, but since its identity is that of an outer Houston suburb, it makes me cringe to think of all the people who reside along the 290 corridor now. That area was meant to be farmland. I'm sure all the residents of Hockley and Waller love how our city is creeping in on their peaceful towns. If things don't reverse in the next decade, pollution levels will be sky high and it will be easier to commute to Austin than to downtown Houston. Hopefully I'll be in another city or tucked inside loop 610 where I don't have to think about all the parasitic growth around what was once a truly great city. Bridgeland is one of the most over-hyped, marketed, corporate projects I have seen in Houston. There is nothing original or inspired about it, and there is no reason to want to move there other than to live in a new development. I hope nobody moves there. I mean come on, there are plenty of homes for sale inside the Beltway along 290. Just go find one and fix it up. It's so sad how intellectually stagnant our country is. Stop the economic growth, control the population, and keep cities at a moderate, functional size. The only homes that should exist around Grand Parkway are rural houses spaced 1/4 miles apart from each other on private land.

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Ok, you've lost credibility now.

The biggest problem with this country is overpopulation. It's unfortunate that Houston, where I live, is still growing at a fast pace, while it was already the 4th largest city in the U.S.

The birth rate is now at or below 2.0 children per couple; without immigration, we would have zero population growth. As productivity and real wages continue to rise, expect to continue seeing decreasing birth rates. Look at Europe for an example of what is in store for us.

Houston is only growing because of immigration and because U.S. residents are relocating to urbanized areas with warmer climates and lower costs of living and doing business.

As has been covered multiple times on this forum, Houston is the 4th largest municipality, but that is irrelevant. It is the 7th largest metropolitan area. Bridgelands is within the ETJ of Houston, but is not within Houston. It will not contribute population. Most of the City of Houston's population growth will take place in the urban core by way of densification.

If Bridgeland considered itself a neighborhood in Waller, TX, I wouldn't complain, but since its identity is that of an outer Houston suburb, it makes me cringe to think of all the people who reside along the 290 corridor now.

Even if they did consider themselves more a part of Waller, TX, Bridgelanders would still commute into Houston. They'd still be part of the economic concept of Houston, even if not citizens of the legal municipality.

The 290 corridor will be expanded to accomodate this growth.

I'm sure all the residents of Hockley and Waller love how our city is creeping in on their peaceful towns.

I'm sure that those who own their homes and farms will make due. [$$$]

If things don't reverse in the next decade, pollution levels will be sky high and it will be easier to commute to Austin than to downtown Houston.

No. That's just false. Pollution levels will likely increase, but eh. [Niche shrugs] Not that big of a deal compared to the affordable housing problem.

Bridgeland is one of the most over-hyped, marketed, corporate projects I have seen in Houston. There is nothing original or inspired about it, and there is no reason to want to move there other than to live in a new development.

If that is true, the hype is big only because the community will be one of the largest. By virtue of its size, shouldn't you expect publicity?

I've driven through the Shores section, and the landscaping was surprisingly nice. Better than I thought it would be, and far and away, better than most of the other subdivisions in the area.

I hope nobody moves there.

They will anyway.

I mean come on, there are plenty of homes for sale inside the Beltway along 290. Just go find one and fix it up.

Yes, plenty of mostly-occupied homes. Gotta put people somewhere.

It's so sad how intellectually stagnant our country is.

Yes, it certainly is. <_<

Stop the economic growth, control the population, and keep cities at a moderate, functional size.

Good thing you don't hold public office. LULAC might have you assasinated. :P

Seriously though, these are things that cannot be stopped. Look at southern California. Look at their housing prices, look at their congestion, look at their cost of living, and look at their government waste. The best we can do is to accomodate and learn to live with it.

The only homes that should exist around Grand Parkway are rural houses spaced 1/4 miles apart from each other on private land.

Too late. Unrealistic expectation.

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Stop the economic growth, control the population, and keep cities at a moderate, functional size.

If we don't keep growing economically and population-wise, China will become the world's largest economy. As a nation, we don't want to be #2 in anything. So we got to keep cranking out the puppies and the profitable-but-poorly-made SUV's. It's a matter of national pride. :)

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The biggest problem with this country is overpopulation. It's unfortunate that Houston, where I live, is still growing at a fast pace, while it was already the 4th largest city in the U.S.

You definitely need to get a better grasp on what qualifies for overpopulation. Our birth rate in this country is as low as it has ever been do to people marrying later in life and having fewer children. Also, people are living longer, causing there to be a greater number of people over all.

If Bridgeland considered itself a neighborhood in Waller, TX, I wouldn't complain, but since its identity is that of an outer Houston suburb, it makes me cringe to think of all the people who reside along the 290 corridor now. That area was meant to be farmland.

How was this land "meant" to be farmland? Who "meant" it to be farm land? Is all land zoned for only one type of use from a set point in history for all eternity? What about before it was all farmland, it was forest? And before that it was nature? Who gets to decide this? Luckily for most Americans, it is its people and land owners. Also, don't even get me started in what environmental impacts farming can have!

I'm sure all the residents of Hockley and Waller love how our city is creeping in on their peaceful towns. If things don't reverse in the next decade, pollution levels will be sky high and it will be easier to commute to Austin than to downtown Houston. Hopefully I'll be in another city or tucked inside loop 610 where I don't have to think about all the parasitic growth around what was once a truly great city. Bridgeland is one of the most over-hyped, marketed, corporate projects I have seen in Houston.

Have you seen advertising for other neighborhoods/developments in town? I have, for all of them, marketing is the name of the game in new home sales. It

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Informative post from H20Buff.

I think Bridgeland is going to be very nice for a tree-challenged community. I'm curious as to whether the developers have considered a tax-increment investment zone? Considering that the current mayor of Houston is amenable to making deals with far-flung suburbs in Houston's ETA, has the possibility of incorporation been discussed with regards to this community (granted there are only 100 or so residents thus far)...but it will eventually grow to 65,000.

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("Did you know Bridgeland has less density (number of houses per set amount of land) than any new development in town - this means that more land is set aside for open space, parks, recreation, etc. Also, the street layout to me is truly remarkable and invigorating. On the thoroughfares, no houses back up to it, leaving a huge row of ugly fences everywhere. Also, on the collector streets, houses are only one side of the street, and often on neither side, putting all of the houses in smaller groupings (of 20-40 lots) helping to make much more of the community feel that many (including yourself) often talk about.")

Excellent information, h2obuff, especially about Bridgeland. I didn't realize it was being planned that well. It definitely sounds like "The Woodlands but without all the trees". If I worked at HP/Compaq or thereabouts, I'd be first in line to buy in Bridgeland. Master-planned communities retain near absolute control over development within their boundaries, and with the wild and dangerous real estate game of Texas, that's the kind of protection other communities would kill for.

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Informative post from H20Buff.

I think Bridgeland is going to be very nice for a tree-challenged community. I'm curious as to whether the developers have considered a tax-increment investment zone? Considering that the current mayor of Houston is amenable to making deals with far-flung suburbs in Houston's ETA, has the possibility of incorporation been discussed with regards to this community (granted there are only 100 or so residents thus far)...but it will eventually grow to 65,000.

TIRZs cannot exist in the ETJ because they do not pay City of Houston taxes. Mayor White is also in most cases not a proponent of TIRZs. He's looking into disbanding quite a few of them. Lastly, the City is not at all interested in annexing MUDs that have very high amounts of outstanding principal but that do not yet have a large tax base. It is a money-losing proposition.

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That's fine. To each his own. I realize that people in Houston (and Texas for that matter) are used to having a yard and driving to get anywhere. Moreover, I realize that not everyone works in DT Houston (I don't either). And if one indeed works near one of these sprawled developments then I can understand the preference to live close to work. But, you can't deny that sprawl does have a negative impact on the environment (clear cutting; creation of more ground level ozone; flooding; heat islands). And the biggest issue that I have with sprawl: it creates an incentive for more and more sprawl!

My first child is due in May. He will attend private school.

It nice that your kid will get to go to a private school, but not every inner-looper has that luxury. And just so you know, my kids will go to a public school and receive just as good of an education with just as many, if not more opportunities than the sheltered private school kids.

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Did General Growth Properties do Stone Gate?

If the company doing bridgeland is General Growth, then NO, I don't think so. Maybe Bridgeland was sold to GG ? I built a few homes in Stone Gate a few years ago, and was told that the same company was starting the Bridgeland project. I will look around and see if I can find who sold us the land to build back then.

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No, but it might've been the Rouse Companies, which General Growth acquired a couple years back.

No, the Stone Gate developments are in no way connect with Bridgeland. Land Tejas is the developer for the Stone Gate's, canyon Gates, etc. The first Rouse/GGP residential project in town is Bridgeland, outside of its mall developments and purchase of the Woodlands a couple of years ago.

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My guess is that this place will be a beautiful and desirable spot once the trees mature in 50 years or so, and an allright spot until then. In 50 years, their idea to reserve greenspace will be even more precious, as all available land nearby will have likely been developed. It will not likely turn "ghetto" because they've got an HOA and are likely to hang on to it. HOAs are hated by some but I say live in an area with people who don't take pride in their surroundings and you'll be wishing you had one, and that scenario is one that Houston will see more of in the future, whereas suburban HOAs can prevent some of that.

Traffic will be nightmarish and what requires leaving at 6:00 today will be 5:00 am next year as the "round the clock rush hour", a la L.A., takes shape, with the 290 corridor being Houston's commute culture version of a petrie dish. People either adapt or move.

Those taxes are just a tad higher than parts of Katy but apparently aren't prohibitive.

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It will not likely turn "ghetto" because they've got an HOA and are likely to hang on to it. HOAs are hated by some but I say live in an area with people who don't take pride in their surroundings and you'll be wishing you had one, and that scenario is one that Houston will see more of in the future, whereas suburban HOAs can prevent some of that.

This is a planned community. It will definitely be hard to turn ghetto. Especially with the upscale homes they'll build.

Edited by SpringTX
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  • 4 months later...
Informative post from H20Buff.

I think Bridgeland is going to be very nice for a tree-challenged community. I'm curious as to whether the developers have considered a tax-increment investment zone? Considering that the current mayor of Houston is amenable to making deals with far-flung suburbs in Houston's ETA, has the possibility of incorporation been discussed with regards to this community (granted there are only 100 or so residents thus far)...but it will eventually grow to 65,000.

I saw the Bridgelands earlier today, and was wondering the same thing. I wonder if Houston would release its ETJ around the Bridgelands, and let it become "Bridgeland, Texas". They could annex, out to the west, too. Just a thought.

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I understand the reasons why people like communities like that, but I just couldn't do the 2 hour commute to get inside the loop each morning from out there. Heaven forbid it rains one morning!

I don't live that much close to the city, but I also work in the energy corridor. My 35 minutes to get 11 miles at 6:30am is as much as I want to put up with anymore.

Wouldn't it make more sense to attract businesses there first and THEN have the communities to supply the workforce?

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  • 1 month later...

I found this in the Bridgeland community newsletter. Can you guys help me find out what's being planned? Specific stores, etc. I couldn't find anything on the GGP website. Any ideas? Is it too soon to tell? I wander if it's going to be anything like La Centerra in Cinco Ranch? At least it claims to not be a typical strip center.

:D

"With over 200 malls in its portfolio, General Growth Properties is planning to make shopping an experience to remember in all future retail centers in Bridgeland, including the future Town Center. The charm of simpler times will blend seamlessly with contemporary conveniences in the retail areas being planned in the Bridgeland community. The first of these centers will front Fry Road and will be adjacent to the Lakeland Activity Center. The retail center will be a stroll away for residents living in Lakeland Village. Additionally, the community trail system will also lead to this and other retail centers. This first center will set the tone for entire community. Not your ordinary suburban strip center, this first center will have the appearance of a friendly "Main Street" and architecture that is unique and full of character. Construction for the site will begin in 2008."

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I never said they were copying Katy. I agree with you though. I wouldn't live in Katy either. I just have to. As a matter of fact, I wouldn't live in any of these piece of crap, plastic suburbs. The Woodlands, Cypress, Katy, Pearland, Sugar Land, etc.

Edited by Trae
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I never said they were copying Katy. I agree with you though. I wouldn't live in Katy either. I just have to. As a matter of fact, I wouldn't live in any of these piece of ____, plastic suburbs. The Woodlands, Cypress, Katy, Pearland, Sugar Land, etc.

Why does every thread have to turn into a suburb vs city bash :unsure:

It really depends on who you ask. Right now, they have no identifiable funding, so maybe never.

Well, it is under design, so that's a start.

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  • 8 months later...

Driving around the metro area has gotten so damn aweful and these places are so far away or off the beaten path they just don't make sense for a good quality of life for the parents. Planned down to the last blade of grass keeps chaos at bay, but also creates some whacky expectations from its residents.

Unless you can find employment within 10 miles of one these planned areas, I wouldn't live in them. Katy and the Energy Corridor make sense. Bridgeland is in the middle of nowhere. I know people like that, but I don't know how they stand driving 3 hours a day.

Edited by KatieDidIt
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Some don't. The Bridgelands is definitely far away from Downtown and Uptown, but not too far away from the Energy Corridor or the 290 Corridor. I think a lot of people who live there travel no further east then the Beltway.

And before you know it (10-20 years down the road), it will have its own business district in the middle of the community.

Edited by Trae
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Some don't. The Bridgelands is definitely far away from Downtown and Uptown, but not too far away from the Energy Corridor or the 290 Corridor. I think a lot of people who live in the there travel no farther east then the Beltway.

And before you know it (10-20 years down the road), it will have its own business district in the middle of the community.

I guess I could see that, but that drive into the EC would be hellish until that time. 65,000 is a lot of people to employ in the EC alone, but who know with the amount of Class A being built right now. Our old neighborhood, in the EC, is really going through some changes, drastic prices increases and MCMansionization is beginning to start.

I just think commuting beyond your residental area will become impossible with the next 3 years. It basically is almost to that point now.

Edited by KatieDidIt
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People who aren't from NW Harris County don't seem to realize that most of the great neighborhoods aren't located right off the freeways, so it's always funny to hear their "view from the highway" opinions. The best neighborhoods in Spring, Klein, Champions and Cypress (for the most part) are located off the beaten path (if you're not familiar with the area.) Of course that hasn't hurt growth as this area has outpaced all other areas of town in growth over the past 10-15 years with no signs of stopping. They're still coming, traffic and all.

While there are a lot of people who suffer the commute to Downtown and the Galleria, these neighborhoods are filled with people who live and work in the area at places like the HP Corridor, 290 Corridor, Beltway, Greenspoint, FM 1960, The Woodlands or the Energy Corridor. Many people I know who work in the EC, simply do not want to live in Katy. Aside from the Memorial area, this is about as close as you get to the energy corridor to still have great schools, big tall trees (North of 290), newer homes and low low crime.

I'm not a big fan of treeless, sun-scorched, master-planned communities like you find South of 290, Katy, Sugar Land or Pearland, however I'd live in Bridgeland. They're creating the new template for landscape planning and have done an awesome job sculpting that landscape and accentuating the natural features like Cypress Creek.

Lastly, I think in coming years there will be an office boom on the 290 corridor, especially in the area in/around Bridgeland, Towne Lake and the planned Grand Parkway. All that frontage on 290 from Fry Rd. to Becker is becoming a whole lot more valuable. Once the 2010 census is complete you're going to see an explosion in retail and Class A office space in these areas.

So characteristic of how many of the other communities in NW Harris county have developed (off the beaten path), the path will be beaten to Bridgeland and beyond.

Edited by mrfootball
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Some pretty ambitious planning (nice though):

Aerial: http://bl.vismark.us/DTS/lots/maps/aerial.asp

What they have so far: http://bl.vismark.us/DTS/lots/eplats/index_base.asp

Conceptual Plan: conceptualplan.gif

I think the little red trails better represent all the cars that will be stuck in traffic when this place is built...haha

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The Woodlands is suburban sprawl in the (flat) trees.

Agreed. Except Indian Springs Village had some roll. But the back part where we lived was flat as a pancake honestly didn't have many more pine trees than east Katy. We planted 17, 100 gallon hardwoods to try to create an effect. We have far more trees where we live now, and we didn't have to plant one!

But I hope what everyone is projecting about other "downtowns" for each burb comes true. I think we are all in for a big shock when the 2010 census comes out with all RECORDED residents. The more that work close to their "perfect place" the better. Just compared to my drives around the Galleria and West Houston 3 years ago, I swear it feels like a million more have moved in. There isn't any open land around here, so they must be commutung in.

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They're creating the new template for landscape planning and have done an awesome job sculpting that landscape and accentuating the natural features like Cypress Creek.

I really think they are doing a quality job in the Bridgelands, and the park along the lakes they created on Cypress Creek with the disc golf course and gaint hardwoods is breathtakingly beautiful. But I can't stand the street layout and I swear the houses are set closer to the street than any other community. Those are the only two things that really bug me about the place...but maybe I am just slow to catch on to their ideas. Does anyone else see this? The houses seem really close to the street and give off a claustrophobic vibe...

I still think Coles Crossing and Longwood are it for me...but the Bridgelands has a Looooong way to go, give it time and I think it will become a great place to raise a family, which is what these neighborhoods are all about in the first place.

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just buy in Waller...10 extra minutes = alot more space for less money...

I ventured back to the NW this weekend...its jammed packed and not worth the drive if you got to work in downtown....its great if you work against the traffic like I did for 5 years.....

Like football said....champions, anywhere off 249 and cypresswood, etc. were great buys as the areas are mature with trees and you have several options to go home.....I lived off 249 and 1960 and worked in Waller County....I could go home though Tomball on 2920 to 249 or cut through by Cy-fair High, etc....

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just buy in Waller...10 extra minutes = alot more space for less money...

I ventured back to the NW this weekend...its jammed packed and not worth the drive if you got to work in downtown....its great if you work against the traffic like I did for 5 years.....

Like football said....champions, anywhere off 249 and cypresswood, etc. were great buys as the areas are mature with trees and you have several options to go home.....I lived off 249 and 1960 and worked in Waller County....I could go home though Tomball on 2920 to 249 or cut through by Cy-fair High, etc....

We live in Cypress and have mature trees (Coles Crossing)...also I commute into downtown every day on the park and ride, about an hour each way. Living in the area is easily worth an hour commute to me and my family, and obviously many others as the area is booming. Waller sure does have a lot of space but I would rather live in Cypress and have much better schools than Waller ISD for my children to attend and save the extra 10 minutes.

Also, many roads in the area are currently being widened...I never have traffic problems getting anywhere in Cypress...the Champions area along 1960 near 249 is a totally different story....

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Yeah it was. It looked just like Cinco Ranch. A lot of areas were middle and upper middle, then turned to ghetto, then people start moving farther out.

Sorry, but Alief never looked like Cinco Ranch, (well, before it was developed it probably did) As you know, Cinco Ranch is a master planned community, so the comparison just isn't there. Maybe you could point out to me some upper middle priced enclaves in Alief but I can't see the resemblance.

Why are you begrudging the fact that you have to live in "crappy plastic suburbia" would you be better off in Alief?

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Sorry, but Alief never looked like Cinco Ranch, (well, before it was developed it probably did) As you know, Cinco Ranch is a master planned community, so the comparison just isn't there. Maybe you could point out to me some upper middle priced enclaves in Alief but I can't see the resemblance.

Why are you begrudging the fact that you have to live in "crappy plastic suburbia" would you be better off in Alief?

Damn, the post I made is ancient. Look at the date.

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Now, all Cypress is alot of Waller and Hempstead natives who moved out that way....not much difference except the scenery

Coles Crossing is nice but that proves that the Northern side of 290 is the better side to invest in as all the "mature" areas rest over there....

however, some areas concern me.....when those KB Hones begin to rot what exactly happens?

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however, some areas concern me.....when those KB Hones begin to rot what exactly happens?

I know what you mean about the south side of 290, but there are neighborhoods like Stonegate, Blackhorse, and Bridgelands down there that will likely age very well with their golf courses and strong HOAs. The KB homes down there are for lower income families now, and as they age....we'll see, but that problem is not unique to Cypress....

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  • The title was changed to Bridgeland Will Bring 65,000 Residents To Northwest Area

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