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houston1973

Grants store downtown

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so i was searching through the net and found this picture of the store name on the floor of the parking lot north of the chronicle building. im going to see if i can make it there later. but does anyone have picture or know where this is.

P.S. it is not at Market Square. this is at the parking lot between the chronicle and mkt square

picture owned by

grants.jpghttp://bayoucityhistory.blogspot.com/

Edited by houston1973

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Correction the ... I was at the Flying Saucer last night and it is actually located on the site of the old Mcdonalds on Tx. The sign is on next to the attendant booth north of the St. Germain on Capital. the pictures is located on ths url

http://lh3.google.com/_vTqdpLWFWaQ/RXZci_O...1600/grants.jpg

grants.jpg

I am stunned to hear that someone else knows about Grant's! My mom used to take me there to eat hamburgers before going to the dentist around 1966-67. The bus would stop right in front, more or less where the tile on the sidewalk says Grants. How cool! I wish I could find a photo but no such luck even on Google. Please show us all if anyone finds it. I have great memories of that place, had the best toys and the coolest Santa Claus around I do have his picture with my big brother and me. Still tripping!

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I am stunned to hear that someone else knows about Grant's! My mom used to take me there to eat hamburgers before going to the dentist around 1966-67. The bus would stop right in front, more or less where the tile on the sidewalk says Grants. How cool! I wish I could find a photo but no such luck even on Google. Please show us all if anyone finds it. I have great memories of that place, had the best toys and the coolest Santa Claus around I do have his picture with my big brother and me. Still tripping!

ill take a pic with my camera phone and post the new one. you are correct HouTran and Metro bus stops were indeed within a few feet of grants.

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This isn't as clear as I would like, but gives you some idea of the layout of Grants

Thank you for that wonderful old map of store locations in downtown Houston! It really brought back memories of my childhood when I would go shopping with my mother. No trip downtown was complete without walking through Grant's, Woolworth's, Kress, and Schulte-United. There was no such thing as self-service. Merchandise at these five-and-dimes was laid out on waist-high counters with shallow movable glass partitions to keep it orderly and each counter was staffed by a salesgirl. Very few items were prepackaged. Purchases were rung up on a cash register that required some skill to operate; although electric, it wasn't automatic, and the salesgirl had to know how to make change herself instead of relying on the register display. The receipt was printed out with numbers only in purple ink, and purchases were placed in flat brown paper bags.

A couple of the five-and-dimes sold sheet music of popular songs and actually had someone to play the piece you were considering on a spinet piano right there in the store. Or, if you wanted a 78rpm record (the only kind back then), a salesgirl would play it for you on a phonograph.

As a native of these parts, I have a lot more recollections of Houston "way back when".

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The map from isuredid sure did help in locating a couple of old pictures that show some of the old Grant's that was sandwiched in between Woolworth's and Burt's/Penney's on Main St. These are from the Bailey collection. They are dated 1939, so changes had probably been made from then to others' more recent memories of it.

e_bb_1289_pub.jpg

e_bb_1290_pub.jpg

e_bb_3883_pub.jpg

The soda fountain at Grant's

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The map from isuredid sure did help in locating a couple of old pictures that show some of the old Grant's that was sandwiched in between Woolworth's and Burt's/Penney's on Main St. These are from the Bailey collection. They are dated 1939, so changes had probably been made from then to others' more recent memories of it.

e_bb_1289_pub.jpg

e_bb_1290_pub.jpg

e_bb_3883_pub.jpg

The soda fountain at Grant's

Unbelievable photo's!

Thank you so much for sharing. I am so glad my mom took us there around Christmas to have our photo taken with Santa. Over our heads is a glittery sign that read "Merry Christmas" and 1965 in small letters underneath. I still recall being nervous and a little scared of course but clearly recall focusing on my mom in front of the crowd waving & saying "smile" There were also many excitied children and their mom's who most had those tall beehive & bouffant hairdoes. Many of the men wore suits & hat's It was sooooo cooool! Very mod 60's for sure.

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This isn't as clear as I would like, but gives you some idea of the layout of Grants

Grants_Map.jpg

Isuredid ... where did you find that map.

im working on my version of houston then an now and that would be a very great source to pinpoint old picures. email me

juanh.castillo@mindspring.com

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Why yes, now that you mention it. :)

It is "The Downtowner" map from 1941. It is available in the Texas Room at the downtown library. I have the whole thing copied, but I can't scan any more of it at the moment.

SEdowntown.jpg

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Awesome - THANKS! ....and I've been meaning to stop by the "Texas Room". Where is it exactly? Is it located in the Public Library? The last time I went by there the library was closed for renovations.

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Awesome - THANKS! ....and I've been meaning to stop by the "Texas Room". Where is it exactly? Is it located in the Public Library? The last time I went by there the library was closed for renovations.

It's still open. Second floor, Julia Ideson building. The map is is the drawers in the map area. Have fun!

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Indeed - thanks guys!!

thank you isuredid.

this will help me out alot in my research.

do they have scanners at that particular library on mckinney or how do you go about getting copies. thanks and i think i found my new home in the Texas room. ive been trying to go for the last few years but time is my enemy.

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thank you isuredid.

this will help me out alot in my research.

do they have scanners at that particular library on mckinney or how do you go about getting copies. thanks and i think i found my new home in the Texas room. ive been trying to go for the last few years but time is my enemy.

They have xerox machines. They just got new ones. The last time I was there they had not yet hooked up the coin machine to it, so the copies were free. That won't last long and may not be true any longer already.

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I am stunned to hear that someone else knows about Grant's! My mom used to take me there to eat hamburgers before going to the dentist around 1966-67. The bus would stop right in front, more or less where the tile on the sidewalk says Grants. How cool! I wish I could find a photo but no such luck even on Google. Please show us all if anyone finds it. I have great memories of that place, had the best toys and the coolest Santa Claus around I do have his picture with my big brother and me. Still tripping!

I used to go to Grant's too, back in 1971-72. My mom would take us there. We would also ride the bus. We would eat hamburgers and I remember buying clothes and records. I wonder if that is now a complete thing of the past or are there any stores left downtown that one can ride the bus to and go shopping? Is it just me or does anyone else feel nostalgic and miss the "good old days" when reading these type of posts?

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I used to go to Grant's too, back in 1971-72. My mom would take us there. We would also ride the bus. We would eat hamburgers and I remember buying clothes and records. I wonder if that is now a complete thing of the past or are there any stores left downtown that one can ride the bus to and go shopping? Is it just me or does anyone else feel nostalgic and miss the "good old days" when reading these type of posts?

Your within good company. Trust me!

There is only one above ground level mall to shop that has a very limited variety of expensive "touristy" stores is The Park Shops. There are also the numerous, winding underground boutiques but nothing like the old days. Foley's is now Macy's and miraculously still operates.Deverlopers and small business owners have been trying for years to bring it back somewhat the way it was but it could never be matched. Even though Main st was revitalized the homeless population is ever present and that alone is a whole other story. I worked off main st for years and can attest to the constant presence of the intimidating homeless people. I do have sympathy, but my coworkers and myself have been harrassed so often by them. Most dont ask for change they demand dollar bills. I can only say I am glad I dont work there anymore!

So, to answer the question I get nostalgic too but prefer to remember the way it was.

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Your within good company. Trust me!

There is only one above ground level mall to shop that has a very limited variety of expensive "touristy" stores is The Park Shops. There are also the numerous, winding underground boutiques but nothing like the old days. Foley's is now Macy's and miraculously still operates.Deverlopers and small business owners have been trying for years to bring it back somewhat the way it was but it could never be matched. Even though Main st was revitalized the homeless population is ever present and that alone is a whole other story. I worked off main st for years and can attest to the constant presence of the intimidating homeless people. I do have sympathy, but my coworkers and myself have been harrassed so often by them. Most dont ask for change they demand dollar bills. I can only say I am glad I dont work there anymore!

So, to answer the question I get nostalgic too but prefer to remember the way it was.

Yes, the Foleys that opened up over here in Parkdale Mall a couple of years ago is now Macy's. I can't keep up with all of these mergers. I'm not familiar with ANY remaining soda fountains with counters and stools in this whole area, and Beaumont's population is over 100,000. I think that there was at least one W.T. Grant in this area, but it folded MANY years ago.

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Yes, the Foleys that opened up over here in Parkdale Mall a couple of years ago is now Macy's. I can't keep up with all of these mergers. I'm not familiar with ANY remaining soda fountains with counters and stools in this whole area, and Beaumont's population is over 100,000. I think that there was at least one W.T. Grant in this area, but it folded MANY years ago.

ms2b1.jpg

woolworth and grants store

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I am stunned to hear that someone else knows about Grant's! My mom used to take me there to eat hamburgers before going to the dentist around 1966-67. The bus would stop right in front, more or less where the tile on the sidewalk says Grants. How cool! I wish I could find a photo but no such luck even on Google. Please show us all if anyone finds it. I have great memories of that place, had the best toys and the coolest Santa Claus around I do have his picture with my big brother and me. Still tripping!

Under another topic I saw that someone had posted a picture of the open air middle part of the then Gulfgate Shopping City. If you look to the left, you'll see Newberry's, and if you look to the right, you can make out a Grant's store.

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e_bb_1288_pub.jpg
Under another topic I saw that someone had posted a picture of the open air middle part of the then Gulfgate Shopping City. If you look to the left, you'll see Newberry's, and if you look to the right, you can make out a Grant's store.

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e_bb_1288_pub.jpg

I can still smell the delicious hamburger & fries while at Grant's. I recall clearly enjoying my lunch meal and watching the crowds meander outside the windows and the hundreds of cars and buses passing. I used to think I was in New York City! It seemed so hustle and bustle. What I really was anxious about was rushing to the toy dept to get my next Lego bldg set and to see what other Godzilla type monster toys I could find. Funny that's what really stood out for me was the restaurant and the TOY DEPT! Yeah!

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I can still smell the delicious hamburger & fries while at Grant's. I recall clearly enjoying my lunch meal and watching the crowds meander outside the windows and the hundreds of cars and buses passing. I used to think I was in New York City! It seemed so hustle and bustle. What I really was anxious about was rushing to the toy dept to get my next Lego bldg set and to see what other Godzilla type monster toys I could find. Funny that's what really stood out for me was the restaurant and the TOY DEPT! Yeah!

Oh, man, you're bringing back memories for me! Many of those burgers were hot and greasy right off of the griddle, served on a bun with the white side toasted. And the greasy fries hot out of the oil vat, innundated with salt, pepper, & ketchup! And a thick chocolate malt that was so thick your cheeks would deflate inward trying to get it through the straw! Tell me more!

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W. T. Grant

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

This article is about W. T. Grant stores, for the namesake founder, see William Thomas Grant

W. T. Grant was the name of a chain of United States-based mass-merchandise stores founded by William Thomas Grant. The stores were generally of the dime store format located in downtowns.

In 1906 the first "W. T. Grant Co. 25 Cent Store" opened in Lynn, Massachusetts. Modest profit, coupled with a fast turnover of inventory, caused the stores to grow to almost $100 million a year in sales by 1936, the same year that William Thomas Grant started the W. T. Grant Foundation. By the time Mr. Grant died in 1972, at age 96, his nationwide empire of W. T. Grant Stores had grown to almost 1,200.

Grant's stores were slower than the Kresge stores to adapt to the growth of the suburb and the change in shopping habits that this entailed. The attempt to correct this was belated; by the late 1960s there were some "Grant City" stores, but unlike Kresge's Kmart they were not of uniform sizes or layouts, meaning that a shopper in one did not immediately feel "at home" in another. The chain's demise in 1975 was in part due to a failure to adapt to changing times but was probably considerably accelerated by management's refusal until it was too late to eliminate the shareholder dividend; even after the company began to lose money, funds were borrowed to pay the quarterly dividend until this became impossible. A last-gasp tactic to stay in business involved requiring each Grant's clerk and cashier unfailingly to offer a Grant's credit card application to customers in order to boost sales in the stores.

Grant's store-branded electronic and other goods were "Bradford" after the county where William Thomas Grant was born in Pennsylvania.

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Grant's stores were slower than the Kresge stores to adapt to the growth of the suburb and the change in shopping habits that this entailed. The attempt to correct this was belated; by the late 1960s there were some "Grant City" stores, but unlike Kresge's Kmart they were not of uniform sizes or layouts, meaning that a shopper in one did not immediately feel "at home" in another.

a "grant city" store:

grantcity.jpg

The W.T. Grant department store chain had a discount division called Grant City. This is one such store in Clementon, N.J.; I had the letters colorized in Grant's familiar orange signage to make them stand out in the picture.

found on this interesting website:

http://www.wtv-zone.com/dpjohnson/60sdisco...ores/page2.html

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W. T. Grant

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

This article is about W. T. Grant stores, for the namesake founder, see William Thomas Grant

W. T. Grant was the name of a chain of United States-based mass-merchandise stores founded by William Thomas Grant. The stores were generally of the dime store format located in downtowns.

In 1906 the first "W. T. Grant Co. 25 Cent Store" opened in Lynn, Massachusetts. Modest profit, coupled with a fast turnover of inventory, caused the stores to grow to almost $100 million a year in sales by 1936, the same year that William Thomas Grant started the W. T. Grant Foundation. By the time Mr. Grant died in 1972, at age 96, his nationwide empire of W. T. Grant Stores had grown to almost 1,200.

Grant's stores were slower than the Kresge stores to adapt to the growth of the suburb and the change in shopping habits that this entailed. The attempt to correct this was belated; by the late 1960s there were some "Grant City" stores, but unlike Kresge's Kmart they were not of uniform sizes or layouts, meaning that a shopper in one did not immediately feel "at home" in another. The chain's demise in 1975 was in part due to a failure to adapt to changing times but was probably considerably accelerated by management's refusal until it was too late to eliminate the shareholder dividend; even after the company began to lose money, funds were borrowed to pay the quarterly dividend until this became impossible. A last-gasp tactic to stay in business involved requiring each Grant's clerk and cashier unfailingly to offer a Grant's credit card application to customers in order to boost sales in the stores.

Grant's store-branded electronic and other goods were "Bradford" after the county where William Thomas Grant was born in Pennsylvania.

Yes, that last-gasp tactic sounds familiar. Sam Walton didn't like credit. He always tried to discourage people from buying things on credit. Now since he's dead, Wal-Mart has their own credit card. I got one easily back in 2004. Now it's a negative item on my credit record. I should have followed Sam's advice and not have applied for a credit card from his store.

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zayre-bangor.jpg

Grants in the foreground

Zayre

One of the first-generation Zayre stores was this one in a Bangor, Maine shopping plaza, seen close-up underneath. Next to it is a shot of a similar store missing its "E", courtesy of Shaun Qualdieri (thanks). Pictured at bottom is a later-built Zayre in Dubuque, Iowa.

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W. T. Grant

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

This article is about W. T. Grant stores, for the namesake founder, see William Thomas Grant

W. T. Grant was the name of a chain of United States-based mass-merchandise stores founded by William Thomas Grant. The stores were generally of the dime store format located in downtowns.

In 1906 the first "W. T. Grant Co. 25 Cent Store" opened in Lynn, Massachusetts. Modest profit, coupled with a fast turnover of inventory, caused the stores to grow to almost $100 million a year in sales by 1936, the same year that William Thomas Grant started the W. T. Grant Foundation. By the time Mr. Grant died in 1972, at age 96, his nationwide empire of W. T. Grant Stores had grown to almost 1,200.

Grant's stores were slower than the Kresge stores to adapt to the growth of the suburb and the change in shopping habits that this entailed. The attempt to correct this was belated; by the late 1960s there were some "Grant City" stores, but unlike Kresge's Kmart they were not of uniform sizes or layouts, meaning that a shopper in one did not immediately feel "at home" in another. The chain's demise in 1975 was in part due to a failure to adapt to changing times but was probably considerably accelerated by management's refusal until it was too late to eliminate the shareholder dividend; even after the company began to lose money, funds were borrowed to pay the quarterly dividend until this became impossible. A last-gasp tactic to stay in business involved requiring each Grant's clerk and cashier unfailingly to offer a Grant's credit card application to customers in order to boost sales in the stores.

Grant's store-branded electronic and other goods were "Bradford" after the county where William Thomas Grant was born in Pennsylvania.

Now you just made me remember some other five-and-dime stores: Ben Franklin, TG&Y, Perry's. Do any of you remember some or all three of those, too?

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Now you just made me remember some other five-and-dime stores: Ben Franklin, TG&Y, Perry's. Do any of you remember some or all three of those, too?

Sure do, and I see that someone mentioned Kresge's I recall them back in the 60's too.

I know many people do miss the days of soda fountains and such but with today's crowd of younger people that dont care it would be impossible to have it as it was. Can't you just see everyone at the counter on a cell phone, ipod, or playing video games and tele-messaging? or blasting away with loud vulger prison music.

Rude, rude, rude. but it has become acceptable in today's society. Not to mention the thugs that would give the attendants a hard time? Too much political correctness crud.

Best we remember how nice it was. :wacko:

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Sure do, and I see that someone mentioned Kresge's I recall them back in the 60's too.

I know many people do miss the days of soda fountains and such but with today's crowd of younger people that dont care it would be impossible to have it as it was. Can't you just see everyone at the counter on a cell phone, ipod, or playing video games and tele-messaging? or blasting away with loud vulger prison music.

Rude, rude, rude. but it has become acceptable in today's society. Not to mention the thugs that would give the attendants a hard time? Too much political correctness crud.

Best we remember how nice it was. :wacko:

Yes, I see your point. Some things are best as fond memories. They say that you can't go back and live in the past. But I like to sit and talk about yesteryear. A set of jacks, the ball, rubber band, and board paddle, and other things you'd get in the five-and-dime stores. Yes, sitting at the soda fountain and hearing someone's cell phone ring would be quite disturbing.

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Now you just made me remember some other five-and-dime stores: Ben Franklin, TG&Y, Perry's. Do any of you remember some or all three of those, too?

there was a TG&Y on the corner of Main and Praire. If i remember that was the last occupant before it was resurrected as a club. currently Suede. The old fallout signs were at each corner.

Yes, I see your point. Some things are best as fond memories. They say that you can't go back and live in the past. But I like to sit and talk about yesteryear. A set of jacks, the ball, rubber band, and board paddle, and other things you'd get in the five-and-dime stores. Yes, sitting at the soda fountain and hearing someone's cell phone ring would be quite disturbing.

i believe Kresge was a forerunner to Kmart

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there was a TG&Y on the corner of Main and Praire. If i remember that was the last occupant before it was resurrected as a club. currently Suede. The old fallout signs were at each corner.

i believe Kresge was a forerunner to Kmart

Yes, it was. Woolworth was a forerunner to Woolco. There used to be one here in Beaumont and one in Port Arthur, but the board of directors closed them down back in 1982. I don't know if Houston ever had any Woolco's or not.

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Unbelievable photo's!

Thank you so much for sharing. I am so glad my mom took us there around Christmas to have our photo taken with Santa. Over our heads is a glittery sign that read "Merry Christmas" and 1965 in small letters underneath. I still recall being nervous and a little scared of course but clearly recall focusing on my mom in front of the crowd waving & saying "smile" There were also many excitied children and their mom's who most had those tall beehive & bouffant hairdoes. Many of the men wore suits & hat's It was sooooo cooool! Very mod 60's for sure.

I found a website called "DeadMalls.Com." It tell all about closed-down malls and retails stores that no longer exist. Either it or one of its links shows Grants. It also tells about San Jacinto Mall and the other malls in the Houston area that are either closed or are about to be.

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I found a website called "DeadMalls.Com." It tell all about closed-down malls and retails stores that no longer exist. Either it or one of its links shows Grants. It also tells about San Jacinto Mall and the other malls in the Houston area that are either closed or are about to be.

Thanks so much.

Penney's nearby also had a great toy dept. I recall getting lost in the mob while playing on the escalators and thought it was the end of the world! Felt like I was in Times Square! :blink:

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Thanks so much.

Penney's nearby also had a great toy dept. I recall getting lost in the mob while playing on the escalators and thought it was the end of the world! Felt like I was in Times Square! :blink:

People on this forum taught me what an "anchor" store is. I've noticed in most malls, J.C. Penney is an anchor store. I didn't major in any field of business, but I don't see how small specialty stores in malls stay afloat. I don't see many people go into them and buy anything.

Over here we have Parkdale Mall in Beaumont and Central Mall in Port Arthur. Most of the malls in Houston put them to shame. Their "anchor" stores are J.C. Penney, Sears, & Macy's. I would think that the malls in Houston would have more. Am I right or wrong?

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I found a website called "DeadMalls.Com." It tell all about closed-down malls and retails stores that no longer exist. Either it or one of its links shows Grants. It also tells about San Jacinto Mall and the other malls in the Houston area that are either closed or are about to be.

2r6mur9.jpg

Heres Gulfgate before it was enclosed. Notice the Grants and the Newberry.

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2r6mur9.jpg

Heres Gulfgate before it was enclosed. Notice the Grants and the Newberry.

Yes, that photo brings back memories. I can still smell the popcorn.

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EastEnd'r,

Would you know if there was there a Grants in the original Meyerland Plaza? Seems like I used to buy live baby turtles there. (Don't ask why I had to buy them over and over again. ...but NO, they were not target practice!)

2r6mur9.jpg

Heres Gulfgate before it was enclosed. Notice the Grants and the Newberry.

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EastEnd'r,

Would you know if there was there a Grants in the original Meyerland Plaza?

it was at 411 meyerland plaza mall according to my 1958 phone book

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Unbelievable photo's!

Thank you so much for sharing. I am so glad my mom took us there around Christmas to have our photo taken with Santa. Over our heads is a glittery sign that read "Merry Christmas" and 1965 in small letters underneath. I still recall being nervous and a little scared of course but clearly recall focusing on my mom in front of the crowd waving & saying "smile" There were also many excitied children and their mom's who most had those tall beehive & bouffant hairdoes. Many of the men wore suits & hat's It was sooooo cooool! Very mod 60's for sure.

I like the old soda fountain bar photo. Amazing stuff like this is not used anymore. Looks like a fun place to eat and hang out.

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I like the old soda fountain bar photo. Amazing stuff like this is not used anymore. Looks like a fun place to eat and hang out.

I agree. Some things that no longer exist, I can understand why, such as the VCR being a reason for drive-in theatres closing down. But I don't understand why drug stores stopped having soda fountains. Here in Beaumont, the Walgreens in Parkdale Mall used to have one, but not anymore. Even the Farrell's Ice Cream Parlor closed down. Would any of you know the reason(s) why?

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I like the old soda fountain bar photo. Amazing stuff like this is not used anymore. Looks like a fun place to eat and hang out.

Hamburger and fries were the best ever! These were those nice zigzag shaped fries and they served your soft drinks in actual glass containers. DTown sure seemed like you were smack in the middle of Times Square. :P

Edited by Vertigo58

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Hamburger and fries were the best ever! These were those nice zigzag shaped fries and they served your soft drinks in actual glass containers. DTown sure seemed like you were snack in the middle of Times Square. :P

I think those are called "krinkle/crinkle cut" fries. I've seen them in the frozen food section in grocery stores. I was told that you simply pop them into a regular oven and VOILA! You're back at the soda fountain.

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I remember going downtown with my mother in the late 60"s and shopping at Grants, Kress, and the little shops along main near the Rice Hotel. My favorite part was being able to buy gum and candy from the little machines which lined Main st.

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I remember going downtown with my mother in the late 60"s and shopping at Grants, Kress, and the little shops along main near the Rice Hotel. My favorite part was being able to buy gum and candy from the little machines which lined Main st.

My god! How did you remember the gumball machines!

You are right they were several on both sides of the street.

Funny everytime this Grant's Store topic resurfaces I can still hear the crowds of people and the elevator music and the best part, the TOY DEPT!

Just last night I dream't I found the toy dept at a big dept store and the first thing I found was a big box of Lego Building Blocks. I was so excited I grabbed the box but I was an adult not a 6 year old kid. Maybe it was a sign? :lol:

Edited by Vertigo58

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