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I'm just trying to get as much knowledge as I can on planning, transit, sprawl and anything related.

These are the books I've checked out so far:

The Creative City

Home From Nowhere

Creating Successful Communities; A Guidebook to Growth Managment Strategies

Breaking the Gridlock; Moving Toward Transportation That Works

I've been referred to a few others, but wanted to know if anyone has more.

Thanks

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I'm just trying to get as much knowledge as I can on planning, transit, sprawl and anything related.

These are the books I've checked out so far:

The Creative City

Home From Nowhere

Creating Successful Communities; A Guidebook to Growth Managment Strategies

Breaking the Gridlock; Moving Toward Transportation That Works

I've been referred to a few others, but wanted to know if anyone has more.

Thanks

How about "On the Road" by Kerouak? It's not exactly the study of transportation that you may be seeking, but I guarantee it's a worthwhile perspective.

Quotes

"I read On the Road in maybe 1959. It changed my life like it changed everyone else's."

-- Bob Dylan

"If you're working with words, it's got to be poetry. I grew up with [the books of Jack] Kerouac. If he hadn't wrote On The Road, the Doors would have never existed. Morrison read On The Road down in Florida, and I read it in Chicago. That sense of freedom, spirituality, and intellectuality in On The Road -- that's what I wanted in my own work."

- Ray Manzarek

"After 1957 On the Road sold a trillion levis and a million espresso machines, and also sent countless kids on the road...the alienation, the restlessness, the dissatisfaction were already there waiting when Kerouac pointed out the road."

- William Burroughs

"That's not writing at all - it's typing."

- Truman Capote, on the story that On the Road was written in three weeks [1]

"It was actually OK to write like this! Who knew?"

- Thomas Pynchon (from the introduction to his Slow Learner anthology)

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How about "On the Road" by Kerouak? It's not exactly the study of transportation that you may be seeking, but I guarantee it's a worthwhile perspective.

Quotes

"I read On the Road in maybe 1959. It changed my life like it changed everyone else's."

-- Bob Dylan

"If you're working with words, it's got to be poetry. I grew up with [the books of Jack] Kerouac. If he hadn't wrote On The Road, the Doors would have never existed. Morrison read On The Road down in Florida, and I read it in Chicago. That sense of freedom, spirituality, and intellectuality in On The Road -- that's what I wanted in my own work."

- Ray Manzarek

"After 1957 On the Road sold a trillion levis and a million espresso machines, and also sent countless kids on the road...the alienation, the restlessness, the dissatisfaction were already there waiting when Kerouac pointed out the road."

- William Burroughs

"That's not writing at all - it's typing."

- Truman Capote, on the story that On the Road was written in three weeks [1]

"It was actually OK to write like this! Who knew?"

- Thomas Pynchon (from the introduction to his Slow Learner anthology)

What's it about?

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I'm just trying to get as much knowledge as I can on planning, transit, sprawl and anything related.

These are the books I've checked out so far:

The Creative City

Home From Nowhere

Creating Successful Communities; A Guidebook to Growth Managment Strategies

Breaking the Gridlock; Moving Toward Transportation That Works

I've been referred to a few others, but wanted to know if anyone has more.

Thanks

The foundation for critical analysis of these strategies is a solid basis in microeconomics and cost-benefit analysis. If you can get a copy of it, I'd recommend the following:

Mishan, Edward J. Cost-Benefit Analysis. 1988 ed.

It is out of print, so you'll have to find it on the web. There are still used copies floating around. Be sure to get the 1988 edition, and not any of the others. If it doesn't make sense at first, study microeconomics until it does.

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What's it about?

I was kinda kidding. The books you listed seemed really dry and technical. On the Road is a stream of consciousness thing that isn't really about anything. It's a diary, really, of Sal Paradise's trips, bumming across America, meeting people, working odd jobs, sleeping in the street, trying out drugs and satisfying the munchies with some killer "hamburgs".

This book was cool before people really knew what cool was.

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The foundation for critical analysis of these strategies is a solid basis in microeconomics and cost-benefit analysis. If you can get a copy of it, I'd recommend the following:

Mishan, Edward J. Cost-Benefit Analysis. 1988 ed.

It is out of print, so you'll have to find it on the web. There are still used copies floating around. Be sure to get the 1988 edition, and not any of the others. If it doesn't make sense at first, study microeconomics until it does.

Yeah, Sal would hate that.

"I like too many things and get all confused and hung-up running from one falling star to another till I drop. This is the night, what it does to you. I had nothing to offer anybody except my own confusion." -- J. Kerouac

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I'm just trying to get as much knowledge as I can on planning, transit, sprawl and anything related.

These are the books I've checked out so far:

The Creative City

Home From Nowhere

Creating Successful Communities; A Guidebook to Growth Managment Strategies

Breaking the Gridlock; Moving Toward Transportation That Works

I've been referred to a few others, but wanted to know if anyone has more.

Thanks

Google.

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I'm just trying to get as much knowledge as I can on planning, transit, sprawl and anything related.

These are the books I've checked out so far:

The Creative City

Home From Nowhere

Creating Successful Communities; A Guidebook to Growth Managment Strategies

Breaking the Gridlock; Moving Toward Transportation That Works

I've been referred to a few others, but wanted to know if anyone has more.

Thanks

Suburban Nation: The Rise of Sprawl and the Decline of the American Dream

Picture Windows: How the Suburbs Happened

The Power Broker: Robert Moses and the Fall of New York

You can probably find them on Amazon.

Edited by nmainguy
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Suburban Nation: The Rise of Sprawl and the Decline of the American Dream

Picture Windows: How the Suburbs Happened

The Power Broker: Robert Moses and the Fall of New York

You can probably find them on Amazon.

I started to read Suburban Nations at Borders and then went to the library to check it out, but they didn't have it. I'm def. gonna read that one.

Thanks for all the suggestions. I'll def read those as well.

I was kinda kidding. The books you listed seemed really dry and technical. On the Road is a stream of consciousness thing that isn't really about anything. It's a diary, really, of Sal Paradise's trips, bumming across America, meeting people, working odd jobs, sleeping in the street, trying out drugs and satisfying the munchies with some killer "hamburgs".

This book was cool before people really knew what cool was.

Actually, I'm halfway done with the Transportation one and it's been really good and interesting. I've read the prefaces for the other ones and they seem pretty good too. I'm trying to get information anyway, not entertainment.

The foundation for critical analysis of these strategies is a solid basis in microeconomics and cost-benefit analysis. If you can get a copy of it, I'd recommend the following:

Mishan, Edward J. Cost-Benefit Analysis. 1988 ed.

It is out of print, so you'll have to find it on the web. There are still used copies floating around. Be sure to get the 1988 edition, and not any of the others. If it doesn't make sense at first, study microeconomics until it does.

Awesome. You come through again, thanks. I really want to get a good grasp on economics too because I know it'll be more than beneficial.

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  • 3 months later...

i'm looking for input from you avid information geeks out there. i'm interested to know what non-fiction books you think everyone should read and what non-fiction book or books changed your world view. i guess, if a fiction book effected your world view, that would be fine too. i.e. ayn rand's the fountainhead (haven't read it yet, but i own it)

here goes:

the bible (whether you believe it's fiction or not, very endearing.....especially proverbs.)

mere christianity - c.s.lewis

a grief observed - c.s.lewis

surprised by joy - c.s.lewis

when character was king - peggy noonan

the hiding place - corrie ten boom

c.s.lewis and the bright shadow of holiness - gerard reed

blue like jazz, nonreligious thoughts on christian spirituality - donald miller

homosexuality, a new christian ethic - elizabeth moberly

inside out - dr. larry crabb

the fingerprint of god - dr. hugh ross

creation and time - dr. hugh ross

that being said, i've stumbled on kierkergaard (sp?) and the writings of st. augustine, but have not started reading those yet. i would have never known who kierkergaard is had it not been for the movie "the addiction" with lili taylor. if you wax philosophical at times and like to tackle the big questions, this is a movie for you. i've read every article i can get my hands on by camille paglia (she's back at salon.com by the way). i've added her books to my amazon.com wishlist.

the reason i put these questions to you, oh mighty haifers, is to broaden my search for knowledge on the human condition. whether a book is historical, a biography, commentary on other works, philosophy, religious, i'd like to know your thoughts.

thanks, in advance!!!!

Edited by bachanon
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i'm looking for input from you avid information geeks out there. i'm interested to know what non-fiction books you think everyone should read and what non-fiction book or books changed your world view. i guess, if a fiction book effected your world view, that would be fine too. i.e. ayn rand's the fountainhead (haven't read it yet, but i own it)

Thanks for sharing your list. I love the C.S. Lewis stuff. Here are a few:

The Labyrinth of Solitude - Octavio Paz

The Hungry Spirit - Charles Handy

100 Years of Solitude - Gabriel Garcia Marquez

On The Road - Jack Kerouac

King Rat - James Clavell?

A Rumor About The Jews - Bronner

Culture and Organization - Geert Hoffstede

Edited by Ralo
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Thanks for sharing your list. I love the C.S. Lewis stuff. Here are a few:

The Labyrinth of Solitude - Octavio Paz

The Hungry Spirit - Charles Handy

100 Years of Solitude - Gabriel Garcia Marquez

On The Road - Jack Kerouac

King Rat - James Clavell?

A Rumor About The Jews - Bronner

Culture and Organization - Geert Hoffstede

i can see from these titles that there are many on your list i will be interested in. thank you.

Edited by bachanon
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Recently out, Zell Miller's, A National party no more

Ronald Kessler's, A Matter of Character

Books I read that changed or shaped my life:

The Bible-

Fastimes at Ridgemont High- Cameron Crowe

Catcher in The Rye- Salinger

Rage- Richard Bachman aka Stephen King

Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy- Doug Adams

Fahrenheit 451- Ray Bradbury

To Kill a Mockingbird- Harper Lee

Your Best Life Now- Joel Osteen

Edited by TJones
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i'm looking for input from you avid information geeks out there. i'm interested to know what non-fiction books you think everyone should read and what non-fiction book or books changed your world view. i guess, if a fiction book effected your world view, that would be fine too. i.e. ayn rand's the fountainhead (haven't read it yet, but i own it)

I'm at a bit of a loss because I read primarily fiction, but I'm a sucker for book recommendations and think your list would be well-rounded by some modern secularist philosophy and less-charged books than the Fountainhead... I'd recommend...

- Rawls, A Theory of Justice

- Unger, Knowledge and Politics

- Foucault, The Order of Things

- Singer, Animal Liberation

Ok, so not necessarily less-charged, but perhaps a balance to the catholicism and objectivism (which are themselves pretty irreconcilable). In order of reputation, I'd rank them: Rawls, Foucault, Singer, Unger - though some would put Foucault first. Mind you, these books are just food for thought; none will give you the road map to life that Lewis and Rand offer. Kiergegaard is a solid choice and, if you go down that path, then also try Nietzche, Sartre, and Wittgenstein.

Paglia is well worth your time and, for balance, read some [maybe just a very little] McKinnon and Dworkin (A. not R., though R. for argument's sake, too).

Fiction, I'd especially recommend a sampling of...

- Borges, [anything - esp. if you like Ralo's Paz suggestion]

- George Saunders, [anything]

Enjoy. If you read any of the above, would like to hear your thoughts.

[Update: Edited to second TJones on Bradbury - Farenheit 451 or any of his other classics.]

Edited by tmariar
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Jane Jacobs, The Death and Life of Great American Cities. If you're interested in architecture or city planning, her name will crop up. Don't let the bulk intimidate you; she writes beautifully without preaching, and it reads as enjoyably as a novel. Fifty years later her ideas are still pertinent; the revival of Toronto, Ontario is often cited as a successful example of her principles at work.

Ralph Nader. Unsafe at Any Speed That this book sparked outrage when first published now seems puzzling; why is the notion that cars ought not kill people so outlandish? His concerns about auto safety sparked public discussion and lead to the creation of national safety standards. His criticism of the Chevrolet Corvair is merely the tip of the iceberg; the safety issues he addressed (and which were implemented) have saved countless lives.

Barry Goldwater, Conscience of a Conservative. For perspective.

Betty Edwards, Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain. Yes, this is an art instruction book - but so much more. Her theories makes one aware of the mystery and potential of the mind while remaining firmly grounded in common sense. And you might learn how to draw, too!

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Recently out, Zell Miller's, A National party no more

Ronald Kessler's, A Matter of Character

Books I read that changed or shaped my life:

The Bible-

Fastimes at Ridgemont High- Cameron Crowe

Catcher in The Rye- Salinger

Rage- Richard Bachman aka Stephen King

Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy- Doug Adams

Fahrenheit 451- Ray Bradbury

To Kill a Mockingbird- Harper Lee

Your Best Life Now- Joel Osteen

Stupid me! Which of these are non-fiction? ;)

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i guess, if a fiction book effected your world view, that would be fine too.

Mary Flannery O'Connor continues to fascinate me. Maybe it's a Catholic thing, but her tales of grace and redemption move me as few writers can. She's funny as hell, in a poker-faced sort of way; her moral imperitive is overwhelming. I read her stories over and over until my head hurts; then, I read them again and laugh like a crazy man.

Start with her short stories. If you're anything like me, they'll leave you puzzled and annoyed - and compelled to ask "What the hell did she mean by that!?"

She has an ear for dialect which rivals Twain.

Buy any collection which includes A Good Man is Hard To Find or Everything That Rises Must Converge.

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Stupid me! Which of these are non-fiction? ;)

:lol::lol::lol:<_<:rolleyes::P;) JERK ! Go read your PETA pamphlets.

That Goldwater book is a good choice though. If you like that, or just need MORE perspective, then you should read A Matter of Character.

The book Rage has since gone out of print here in the U.S. because of the Columbine shootings and the like. I read this book back in about 1989 or 1990, and it immediately came to mind when the school shootings broke out.

Edited by TJones
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great suggestions all.

tmrariar, i think you get the direction that i'm going. great advice. thanks.

keep 'em coming guys. i'm compiling a list. i should be through reading by 2045.

tjones, there are five in your list i've felt i should read but haven't. we weren't required in christian school to read books like "catcher in the rye". my nephew is reading fahrenheit 451 for class this semester.

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Mary Flannery O'Connor continues to fascinate me. Maybe it's a Catholic thing, but her tales of grace and redemption move me as few writers can. She's funny as hell, in a poker-faced sort of way; her moral imperitive is overwhelming. I read her stories over and over until my head hurts; then, I read them again and laugh like a crazy man.

Start with her short stories. If you're anything like me, they'll leave you puzzled and annoyed - and compelled to ask "What the hell did she mean by that!?"

She has an ear for dialect which rivals Twain.

Buy any collection which includes A Good Man is Hard To Find or Everything That Rises Must Converge.

i think i'm going to like flannery o'connor too. also, the barry goldwater book intrigues me. thanks.

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great suggestions all.

tmrariar, i think you get the direction that i'm going. great advice. thanks.

keep 'em coming guys. i'm compiling a list. i should be through reading by 2045.

tjones, there are five in your list i've felt i should read but haven't. we weren't required in christian school to read books like "catcher in the rye". my nephew is reading fahrenheit 451 for class this semester.

I was required to read "1984" in Highschool also. I probably would have read it on my own, but my English teacher was a bit of a conspiracy theorist, so she made us read it. She was also the best teacher I've ever had.

My father was a huge reader, me, not so much. "Catcher" doesn't have quite the impact when you get to our age Bach, and realize that teenagers really don't know Jack, so you might get a little bored with it, but still a decent read, it will probably make you think back and say, "That's exactly how I felt back then." If you haven't read Cameron Crowe's "Fast Times...", I suggest you read it. I read it for the nostalgia, it is totally different from the movie, and there is a great couple of chapters about Disneyland, and having your "first time".

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My Own Country by Abraham Verghese

About an AIDS epidemic that hits rural Tennessee in 1985 and how this doctor and a conservative population dealt with it and overcame their pre-concieved notions about the disease.

Diliberate Indifference by Howard Swindal

About racial injustice, respect and human decency in East Texas.

The Art of Understanding Yourself by Cecil Osborne

Just read it.

The City of Joy by Dominique Lapierre

Fiction based on historical fact in Calcutta. The best description I can give you is it's a story about how charity, love and grace can co-exist and at times overcome death, callousness and disease.

Beyond Love by Dominique Lapierre

Another fiction based on actual events. Again based on personal courage, grace, hope, love and charity for lifes outcasts whether they be Lepers or early victems of AIDS.

Read "If" by Rudyard Kipling when you feel things are slipping out of your control.

I like Lapierre in the two listed above because of the compelling and very true-to-life messages he sends.

I like Rand because I think she is a great descriptive writer though much of her philosopy is a fantasy.

If you are going to read her I suggest The Fountainhead first and Atlas Shrugged second.

All of the above plus more has informed my life's outlook.

Good luck. B)

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  • 2 weeks later...

i had hoped for more avid readers on haif. i appreciate the input, so far, but i thought for sure someone would have some classics to suggest.

christian school didn't expose us to many of the classics because they were more "humanistic".

anyone love classic literature? in my mind, i think the classics are dante, homer, not necessarily the romantics. i guess many of these will be fiction, but they shed light on the human condition.

thanks, in advance.

Edited by bachanon
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John McPhee - Travels In Georgia

(unknown author) - The Good Earth

I'm in the middle of The Kite Runner right now, and it seems pretty good.

I read The Good Earth back in highschool editor. Good book about rags to riches then back to rags again. You are referring to the Pearl S. Buck novel, correct ?

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I read The Good Earth back in highschool editor. Good book about rags to riches then back to rags again. You are referring to the Pearl S. Buck novel, correct ?

Yep. That's the one. Thanks for filling in the blank on the author there. I read it in high school, too, and it always stuck with me.

The only other books I remember from high school were Jane Eyre and The Sun Also Rises. I hated Jane Eyre then and I still hate it now. Hemmingway's The Sun Also Rises worked nicely with my dress-in-all-black Depeche Mode-listening high school days. I wonder if it would still make sense now.

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1987, black turtle neck (in may), cloves cigarette, doc martins.....ahhhh, takes me back.

She's dressed in black again

And I'm falling down again

Down to the floor again

I'm begging for more again

But oh what can you do

When she's dressed in black

My mind wanders endlessly

On paths where she's leading me

With games that she likes to play

And words that she doesn't say

Not when we are along

And she is dressed in black

As a picture of herself

She's a picture of the world

A reflection of you

A reflection of me

And it's all there to see

If you only give in

To the fire within

Dressed in black again

Shadows fall on to me

As she stands there over me

And waits to encompass me

I lay here helplessly

But oh what can you do

When she's dressed in black

Dressed in black again...

http://www.last.fm/music/Depeche+Mode/_/Dressed+in+Black

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I would recommend a few authors Klosterman, Kidder, Thompson and Albom.

The book by Kidder is Mountains beyound Moutains... It really is a great book. 2 chuck klosterman books; Sex, Drugs, and Cocoa Puffs a low culture manifesto and IV: a decade of curious people and dangerous ideas. I would recommend all of Mitch Albom's book he has some great short quick reads. Last everyone should read ever Hunter S. Thompson book, Gonzo art is so amazing and his gonzo writing is great.

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i had hoped for more avid readers on haif. i appreciate the input, so far, but i thought for sure someone would have some classics to suggest.

christian school didn't expose us to many of the classics because they were more "humanistic".

anyone love classic literature? in my mind, i think the classics are dante, homer, not necessarily the romantics. i guess many of these will be fiction, but they shed light on the human condition.

thanks, in advance.

not to get off the subject but what christian school didn't expose you to the classics?

if you want classics i will have to recommend the prince and the pauper, the scarlett letter, fall of the house of usher, house of the seven gables, taming of the shrew, Death comes for the archbishop, old man and the sea, a farewell to arms, of mice and men. grapes of wrath, east of eden. these are some i remember reading in high school.

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not to get off the subject but what christian school didn't expose you to the classics?

if you want classics i will have to recommend the prince and the pauper, the scarlett letter, fall of the house of usher, house of the seven gables, taming of the shrew, Death comes for the archbishop, old man and the sea, a farewell to arms, of mice and men. grapes of wrath, east of eden. these are some i remember reading in high school.

I went to Catholic school, and we read hardly any of the classics. I think we had one each year during the term, and then one more over Summer. These days I really feel like I missed out on a lot, so I get them free from Project Gutenberg and load them into my phone/PDA. I highly recommend that site to anyone who wants to catch up on the classics.

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I went to Catholic school, and we read hardly any of the classics. I think we had one each year during the term, and then one more over Summer.
where did you go to school? i thought we had ot read too much! all i remember was 7 during the summer. and then lots during the school year itself.
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not to get off the subject but what christian school didn't expose you to the classics?

if you want classics i will have to recommend the prince and the pauper, the scarlett letter, fall of the house of usher, house of the seven gables, taming of the shrew, Death comes for the archbishop, old man and the sea, a farewell to arms, of mice and men. grapes of wrath, east of eden. these are some i remember reading in high school.

i think we read excerpts of the scarlet letter and old man and the sea in high school. at north harris i read all of the scarlet letter, the fall of the house of usher and a farewell to arms, but none of the others.

project gutenburg is a great idea.

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i had hoped for more avid readers on haif. i appreciate the input, so far, but i thought for sure someone would have some classics to suggest.

The Garden of Eden by Hemingway-one of his last published works. It's a tough book to find so if you are really interested I will lend it to you but if you don't return it I'll have to send my Uncle Vito to retieve it. ^_^

The Good Earth by Buck-and I know it's been mentioned before but it will never stop being a classic work. It will always make you think.

American poetry: Robert Frost; Walt Whitman for starters.

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austin.

Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane

Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad.

And of course Moby Dick by Herman Melville.

Alot of people will scoff at my list and call it old-school. That's not OK because if it wasn't for "old school" you would never had known of Morrison, McCullough, Sontag and Twain,

But it's always hard to make a list if I don't know what your intrest in classics is. I just love descriptive writers like Austin, Hemingway, Twain, Rand, Steinbeck, Morrison, Faulkner, McCullough, Sontag and Williams. It takes a rare skill to draw you into the narritive in a way most writers can't.

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Bachanon, I've got tons of classic fiction I could recommend, if you want those recommendations.

I'll list some non-fiction "classics" I enjoyed (or found important), though, as you seem more interested in that - and, if you tell me which seem along the lines of what you're interested in, I can list more in that area. The Rawls book I listed above is a classic of "modern liberal philosophy" (which doesn't really mean the same thing as liberal political philosophy), and I mentioned some earlier philosophers as well (and can list more classic philosophy, if you want, there's tons to read there that's good beyond what I listed above and below - Bentham, John Stuart Mill, Hume, Kant, Rousseau, Locke, Hobbes, etc., etc., etc.). Then there's also...

Frazer, The Golden Bough ("A monumental study in comparative folklore, magic and religion, The Golden Bough shows parallels between the rites and beliefs, superstitions and taboos of early cultures and those of Christianity. It had a great impact on psychology and literature and remains an early classic anthropological resource.")

Darwin, The Origin of Species

Marx, Communist Manifesto

Adam Smith, The Wealth of Nations

Mead, Coming of Age in Samoa

Plato, The Republic

Sun Tzu, The Art of War

Thoreau, Walden

Malcom X, Autobiography of Malcom X

Machiavelli, The Prince

Friedan, The Feminine Mystique

Freud, The Interpretation of Dreams

Carson, Silent Spring

Gibbon, Decline of the Roman Empire

Singer, Animal Liberation

These are just ones that came to mind off the top of my head. Note that I'm not saying that I necessarily agree with the positions taken in any given book listed. If I just read books that told me what I already believe, though, I don't think my beliefs would be as fully formed.

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Bachanon, I've got tons of classic fiction I could recommend, if you want those recommendations.

I'll list some non-fiction "classics" I enjoyed (or found important), though, as you seem more interested in that - and, if you tell me which seem along the lines of what you're interested in, I can list more in that area. The Rawls book I listed above is a classic of "modern liberal philosophy" (which doesn't really mean the same thing as liberal political philosophy), and I mentioned some earlier philosophers as well (and can list more classic philosophy, if you want, there's tons to read there that's good beyond what I listed above and below - Bentham, John Stuart Mill, Hume, Kant, Rousseau, Locke, Hobbes, etc., etc., etc.). Then there's also...

Frazer, The Golden Bough ("A monumental study in comparative folklore, magic and religion, The Golden Bough shows parallels between the rites and beliefs, superstitions and taboos of early cultures and those of Christianity. It had a great impact on psychology and literature and remains an early classic anthropological resource.")

Darwin, The Origin of Species

Marx, Communist Manifesto

Adam Smith, The Wealth of Nations

Mead, Coming of Age in Samoa

Plato, The Republic

Sun Tzu, The Art of War

Thoreau, Walden

Malcom X, Autobiography of Malcom X

Machiavelli, The Prince

Friedan, The Feminine Mystique

Freud, The Interpretation of Dreams

Carson, Silent Spring

Gibbon, Decline of the Roman Empire

Singer, Animal Liberation

These are just ones that came to mind off the top of my head. Note that I'm not saying that I necessarily agree with the positions taken in any given book listed. If I just read books that told me what I already believe, though, I don't think my beliefs would be as fully formed.

everyone should read Marx, once you understasnd communism it makes so much more sense than any other system. To bad it would never work. Also for more classic, check out....

Michel Foucault

Emile Durkheim

Charlotte Perkins Gilman

William James

Anna Julia Cooper

John Maynard Keynes

Georg Lukacs

Betty Friedan

Saskia Sassen

Frantz Fanon

Claude Levi-Strauss.

Buit I would also recommend comtemporary readings, the classics are good, but there is some great new books out there Theoriest or not.

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Nice recovery . . . I was gonna ask Jeebus to slap you on principle alone. j/k

lol, honestly if we weren't so rooted in heiracrhial societies and now capitalism, I think if we started out as socialist, and then moved towards communism it could possible work... but we are to embedded with personal gain, socioeconomic status etc... to even see a system liek that working.. To many it just doesn't even sound like it could possible make sense.

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lol, honestly if we weren't so rooted in heiracrhial societies and now capitalism, I think if we started out as socialist, and then moved towards communism it could possible work... but we are to embedded with personal gain, socioeconomic status etc... to even see a system liek that working.. To many it just doesn't even sound like it could possible make sense.

I think it is a hard sell but I will agree that socialism, on paper, can sometimes sounds appealing.

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I think it is a hard sell but I will agree that socialism, on paper, can sometimes sounds appealing.

thats the thing, on paper a lot of things sound great, just sometimes they don't work. I also think we have a hard time to understand things such as communism and socialism, because of our past. With the Red Scare and all the failed attempts of both systems.

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Some recent reads:

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A Short History of Tractors in Ukrainian - Marina Lewycka

A Moveable Feast: Ten Millenia of Food Globalization - Kenneth Kiple

Amsterdam - Ian McEwan (a quick read but worth it)

The Black Swan - Nassim Taleb (the likelihood of statistically unlikely events)

Imperial Life in the Emerald City - Rajiv Chandrasekaran

Rites of Peace - Adam Zamoyski (all about the Congress of Vienna)

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Recently I have just finished reading "740 Park" by Gross (I forgot the first name and gave the book away).

It gives the history of the Luxury apartment Building located in New New York that was built at the beginning of the great depression as well as some of the eccentric (or rather philandering) characters that have lived in that building.

It's a bit of an eye opener, actually.

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  • 9 months later...
  • The title was changed to What Are You Reading?

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