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Galvez Mall


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18 hours ago, k5jri radio said:

The March 1996 departure of Bealls, the last anchor store in Galvez Mall (along with the failure to find another comparable tenant), likely made the closure of the mall all but certain. Bealls was founded in Bradenton, FL, in 1915 by Robert M. Beall, Sr. The Bealls stores operating in Texas and many other states was the result of the split of assets between various members of the Beall family. The Beall family members operating stores in Texas and several other states later sold their real and intellectual property to Houston-based Stage Stores. When Stage Stores filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in 2020, Bealls Florida purchased their intellectual property, which included the right to use all brand names formerly owned by Stage Stores. Among other rights, Bealls Florida can use the Bealls brand name throughout the United States. 

Source?  I can find no evidence that the two families were related or were ever in business together. I think the 1988 sale of Beall's to the newly-formed Specialty Retailers Inc was caused at least in part by a family split/argument.  In any event, Beall's (Texas) was founded in Henderson, Texas in 1923. The company (not just it's real and intellectual property) was sold to Speciality Retailers who also purchased Houston-based Palais Royal at the same time and HQ was moved to Houston.  Some years later they acquired Stage Stores and changed the corporate name to Stage Stores.

As you said, Beall's (Florida) bought the IP and other assets out of bankruptcy.

 

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Despite the coincidence of the same surname, I have not found evidence to show the respective Beall families in Florida and Texas were biologically related or ever in business together. Bealls (Texas) was a continuously operating business entity under several corporate names until the bankruptcy of Stage Stores in 2020. Bealls (Florida) then purchased intellectual and real property from the bankrupt corporation.

Edited by k5jri radio
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To Dan H; The 6600 Broadway Hudson Oil service station would have been the optimal place to fill up before starting a fairly long trip north to Shreveport LA. Once out of the Houston area, most of the 4-hour trip north was through sparsely populated areas of east Texas. My preference for long trips, then and now, was to start out with a full tank and avoid (or at least minimize) having to stop for gasoline along the way.    

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The mall looks like it was pretty nice up until a few years prior to its demise.

I had a thought, it seems like nowadays the "pace of change" for places like malls is slower. Like, many malls of the 1960s and 1970s only lasted about 30 years. 30 years ago was 1992, there aren't as many dead shopping centers from 1992 around today. I wonder if the retail industry was more volatile back then, when it was a new and growing thing. Nowadays there are only a handful of major chains, a lot of malls have vanished, so of course that means what remains are regional or flagship stores operated by giant publicly traded corporations that have deep pockets.

Kind of like how when the internet was young there were a lot of different search engines and a lot of major websites and a lot of different brands of PC's and early smartphones and many of them came in a flash and vanished. Now there's just a few giant social media platforms, and a handful of companies that sell the majority of mobile devices.

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I remember that the new Mall of the Mainland built in 1991 across the causeway in Texas City became the place to be seen and to shop also contributed to the demise of the Galvez Mall during its last years. The Mall of the Mainland was new, and the old Galvez Mall was deteriorating, and it was only a short drive and a much shorter drive than going all the way to the Baybrook Mall on I45 in Friendswood.  

12424960.jpg

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Posted (edited)

Interesting posting with photograph about the Mall of the Mainland located at Texas City TX, approximately 16 miles across the causeway from Galveston Island. In addition to being 23 years newer (opened in 1991) than the Galvez Mall (opened in 1968), the Mall of the Mainland had twice the enclosed area (800,000 sq.ft.) than the Galvez Mall (400,000 sq.ft.). When Sears left the Galvez Mall (circa late 1991 or early 1992) and relocated to the Mall of the Mainland, the resultant loss of "foot traffic" in the Galvez Mall may have been a factor prompting another anchor store, Eibands, to vacate the Galvez Mall at the end of the summer in 1992. In March 1996, Beall's, the last remaining anchor store, closed its Galvez Mall store location.

Although it may be coincidental, the last owners of the Galvez Mall renamed it, The Island, giving it a geographical identification similar to the Mall of the Mainland. More research is needed to determine if the Galvez Mall renaming was deliberate or coincidental.

Over time the Mall of the Mainland declined to approximately 65 percent occupancy (circa 2002) due in part to competition from Baybrook Mall in Houston (Friendswood mailing address, but within Houston city limits), approximately 10 miles north. The Mall of the Mainland had several changes in ownership until developer Jerome Karam bought the property in 2015. That same year he sold part of the property (the building formerly occupied by Dillard's) to First Baptist Church of Texas City and renamed the remainder of the property, Shops on the Mainland. After another renaming In 2020, the property is now named Mainland City Centre.

Edited by k5jri radio
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  • 3 weeks later...
Posted (edited)

The comments about the Mall of the Mainland (Texas City, TX) during the early to mid 1990's being a place to "be seen and to shop" underscore the social aspects inherent in enclosed shopping malls and similar retail venues.

Edited by k5jri radio
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  • 1 month later...
Posted (edited)

According to another Galvez Mall posting, prior to the opening of the Eibands department store in one of the anchor locations at the Galvez Mall, there was a Globe department store in the same location. Per online sources, Globe stores operated in Texas and other states in the southwest as a big box retail unit of Walgreens for much of its existence (1960-1999). The posting's author stated his recollection of shopping at the Globe store in Galvez Mall coincided with the time The Warriors movie was creating a lot of controversy. The Warriors was released on February 9, 1979 and grossed $22.5 million (approximately $91 million in 2022 dollars) against a $4 million production budget (approximately $16.5 million in 2022 dollars). The Warriors movie is currently available for streaming on ROKO, VUDU, and possibly other services. Also, The Warriors movie is available on  DVD & Blu-Ray disc formats from Amazon.com.

Edited by k5jri radio
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  • 2 months later...

Resurrecting a screename I haven’t logged into in 15 years here… I beg to differ on the decline of Mall of the Mainland being because of Baybrook, Baybrook was always the better mall to go to (and it was built in 1978 I believe).  I was born and raised in Galveston and we frequently drove right past Galvez and Mall of the Mainland to go to Baybrook.  It’s a testament to Baybrook’s strength as a mall, that even these days, in a era where malls are have become a bygone relic, Baybrook is bigger and stronger than ever, having added an outdoor mall area too.  
 

I would describe Mall of the Mainland as a blip, it was never “the place” to be, it really only had about 5-10 year heyday if you could call it that.  As a Galvestonian the main reason to go to Mall of the Mainland was the movie theater (or sheer laziness if you were shopping and didn’t want to drive 12 more mins to Baybrook), which after the closure of the Broadway Theater and Galvez Mall theaters became the closest theater.  This even fell off after the megaplexes came into fashion in the late 90s.  Suddenly, rather than bother with the dinky old 12 screen at Mall of the Mainland you’d drive 20-30 miles to go to the AMC 30 at the beltway or Cinemark in Webster.  Then they built the small theater in Galveston which was good enough and left pretty much no reason to go to Mall of the Mainland at all.  

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I worked at Aladdins castle in Galvez Mall in 1992 and loved this little mall. I saw so many free movies because I would give free games to the guys that worked at the theater. Loved Kay Bee Toys. They had a great selection of Nes games back then. Wished you had pics of that area. Eibands had great hamburgers too believe it or not. 

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3 hours ago, player1videogames said:

I worked at Aladdins castle in Galvez Mall in 1992 and loved this little mall. I saw so many free movies because I would give free games to the guys that worked at the theater. Loved Kay Bee Toys. They had a great selection of Nes games back then. Wished you had pics of that area. Eibands had great hamburgers too believe it or not. 

Aladdin's castle...now that brings back some memories.

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As far a I know, none of the postings pertaining to Mall of the Mainland, state that Baybrook Mall was the main causal factor for the decline of the Mall of the Mainland. The language in my own posting, "due in part to competition from the Baybrook Mall," clearly allows for the existence of other causal factors for the decline of the Mall of the Mainland.

The statement about the Mall of the Mainland being "a place to be seen and to shop" is the opinion of one Galveston resident at the time explaining why he and others he knew (at the time) went there. Likewise, the contrasting statement about the Mall of the Mainland as "never the 'place to be be'" is the opinion of another Galveston resident at the time explaining why he and others he knew (at the time) went elsewhere.

Causal relationships allow for reasonable inferences to be made, but the only way to establish actual cause and effect is a controlled experimental model. For example, if it were possible to create an alternate reality in which Baybrook Mall was never built, but all other variables were identified and left unchanged, then what happened to the Mall of the Mainland in this alternate reality would be likely to prove or disprove a causal relationship between the two malls (but only within this alternate reality).  

Edited by k5jri radio
grammar
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