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Quad Housing

 

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Pilings for the south side building.

 

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Banner of the project.

 

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https://www.bizjournals.com/houston/news/2019/05/28/university-of-houston-system-to-receive-109.html

 



The Texas Legislature approved $109 million in state funding to the University of Houston System for three of its projects and general revenue increases, according to a May 26 press release.

 

The money will help pay for the UH College of Medicine, new facilities for the UH Law Center and Hobby School of Public Affairs, and repairs to buildings damaged by Hurricane Harvey. Legislators also approved a dedicated student fee to pay for wellness centers at UH-Downtown and UH-Victoria per the release.

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University of Houston System approved for $109 million in state funding 

A depiction of what the University of Houston's new College of Medicine building could look like at the MacGregor site.

A depiction of what the University of Houston's new College of Medicine building could look like at the MacGregor site.

COURTESY UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON

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By Jonathan Adams  – Associate editor, Houston Business Journal 
13 hours ago
 

The Texas Legislature approved $109 million in state funding to the University of Houston System for three of its projects and general revenue increases, according to a May 26 press release.

The money will help pay for the UH College of Medicine, new facilities for the UH Law Center and Hobby School of Public Affairs, and repairs to buildings damaged by Hurricane Harvey. Legislators also approved a dedicated student fee to pay for wellness centers at UH-Downtown and UH-Victoria per the release. 

Each bill passed now awaits Gov. Greg Abbott's signature. A bill that would recognize the medical school had been sent to the governor's desk in April.

“I am extremely grateful for the support of Gov. Greg Abbott, Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick and Speaker Dennis Bonnen throughout this session and to all of our state lawmakers for making higher education such an important priority,” Renu Khator, chancellor of the University of Houston System, said in the release. “Building great public institutions is truly a partnership with our elected leaders. Their support will help our system’s 74,000 students succeed, which in turn creates a qualified workforce, healthy communities and a prosperous Texas.”

Of the $109 million total, the medical school will receive $20 million next biennium to help with startup costs, per the release. The school hopes to admit its first class of students in fall 2020, pending accreditation by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education, according to the release.

The University plans to ask the legislature for an additional $20 million over the next four sessions, according to the release.

UH's degree will cost $23,755 per year. An anonymous donation announced in July 2018 will cover full four-year tuition for the entire inaugural class, which is expected to be 30 students, and a gift from the John M. O'Quinn Foundation will cover tuition for one-third of the second class. The school expects to have a full enrollment of 480 students over the next eight years.

 

“We are thrilled and thankful that our lawmakers recognize the need to build Houston’s first medical school in nearly 50 years,” Dr. Stephen Spann, founding dean of the UH College of Medicine, said in the release. “The startup funding is another critical milestone necessary to help us achieve our mission of training more primary care physicians to address a significant statewide shortage.”

The UH Law Center and the UH Hobby School of Public Affairs will receive $45 million for new facilities, with a focus on modernizing technology in the buildings, creating flexible spaces and mitigating problems associated with the previous flood-prone structure, according to the release.

The UH System will also receive about $18 million in general revenue funding increases based on enrollment growth and a little more than $26 million split four ways for Hurricane Harvey recovery not covered by insurance or the Federal Emergency Management Agency, per the release.

  • University of Houston: $20.3 million
  • University of Houston-Downtown: $4 million
  • University of Houston-Victoria: $1.7 million
  • University of Houston-Clear Lake: $83,668

Lastly, the legislature authorized a dedicated student fee to pay for a new wellness and success center at UH-Downtown and a new recreation and wellness center at UH-Victoria, per the release. Students at each campus approved the fees for the projects, according to the release.

The amount of the fees may not exceed $150 per student for each regular semester, per the release.

 

“We had critical needs throughout the UH System coming into this legislative session and our elected leaders could not have been more supportive,” Jason Smith, UHS vice chancellor of governmental relations, said in the release. “The state of Texas has innumerable competing interests that have to be juggled and, from the outset, from Gov. Abbott on down, our leaders made it known that higher education was a priority. The support provided this session will strengthen each of our universities, the communities around us, and the state.”

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Posted (edited)

Looks like they really do want to tear down Moody towers and replace it with a layout similar to the new quads or maybe cougar villages. Not gonna lie I wish they would have gone with rebuilding into a dual high-rise towers just so that there is more diversity in the type of on campus housing.  This will also remove a staple landmark of the campus that you are able to see from a distance. 

 

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Edited by robalob
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So big news happening on the food side of UH.

Firstly cougar woods is going to be renovated: 

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Secondly UH will build a food truck park in lot 21A:

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Finally after the moody towers are torn down and rebuilt, here's what the dining hall will look like: 

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Honestly an amazing rebuild of the dining hall system at UH, can't wait for it to happen. Have a lot of memories staying in moody dining for hours upon hours, just hanging out and studying with friends (also the tendies). 

I also found a rendering of the new COT rebuild, but I can't seem to find it anymore. 

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On 6/3/2019 at 8:25 PM, robalob said:

Looks like they really do want to tear down Moody towers and replace it with a layout similar to the new quads or maybe cougar villages. Not gonna lie I wish they would have gone with rebuilding into a dual high-rise towers just so that there is more diversity in the type of on campus housing.  This will also remove a staple landmark of the campus that you are able to see from a distance. 

 

Screenshot 2019-06-03 at 8.24.17 PM.png

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Screenshot 2019-06-03 at 8.23.11 PM.png

 

Where did you get this info? Link? I've been looking everywhere for this.

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On 7/31/2019 at 7:34 PM, Luminare said:

 

Where did you get this info? Link? I've been looking everywhere for this.

I think it was in an email sent to students living on campus, and some of the faculty/staff. At least that's what some people on campus said. 

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20a and 20c are both fenced in for new garage construction.

 

a campus officer I spoke with when they were ensuring all the cars were removed from the lots was confident that the garage still under construction will be complete and ready for parking by the beginning of the semester, which is august 19.

 

I don't think they're gonna make it, which means a lot of overflow parking at the energy campus.

 

they are cutting an entrance to this new parking lot at Elgin, about halfway between Entrance 18 and the spur 5 feeder. they are also reconfiguring the turn from elgin onto spur 5.

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That's a dumb place to put a medical school. Separated from the main campus AND the TMC. Turning its back on resources that is existing already and could attract great students!

2 minutes ago, bobruss said:

They keep knocking out of the park. There is so much going on in every corner of the campus. 

The new Quadrant dormitories, the new garage/ art sculpture center, the architecture innovation lab, the football practice center, the basketball arena and practice facilities, the baseball field stadium upgrades, and the new college of medicine.
As a matter of fact all four major schools have added quite a few new building or have several under construction.

T.S.U. just finishing up the new Library,  and St. Thomas just built their new science building, while Rice has added a new Art Gallery, athletic performance center,

the Opera House is getting closer, and a new graduate building under construction just east of the Basketball gym. 

Good to see all of our centers of higher learning staying fresh and making improvements.

 

 

Don't forget HBU!

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This is all part of the Universities campus. Just like the petroleum engineering school and other energy related programs that have taken over the old Schlumberger campus just across the rail lines to the east. This is just an extension of the southern end of the campus, and room for a family living center for students staff and faculty. It lies right across the street from MacGregor park. You can ride your bicycle from there to the med center along the Bayou.

The school will be less than ten minutes from the med center and will have shuttles, just like U.T. uses for its students to get around the med center.

 

I don't have a clue what's going on at HBU. I don't go by it ever, and just don't know.

Start a thread and fill us in. 

 

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52 minutes ago, bobruss said:

This is all part of the Universities campus. Just like the petroleum engineering school and other energy related programs that have taken over the old Schlumberger campus just across the rail lines to the east. This is just an extension of the southern end of the campus, and room for a family living center for students staff and faculty. It lies right across the street from MacGregor Park. You can ride your bicycle from there to the med center along the Bayou.

The school will be less than ten minutes from the med center and will have shuttles, just like U.T. uses for its students to get around the med center.

 

I don't have a clue what's going on at HBU. I don't go by it ever, and just don't know.

Start a thread and fill us in. 

 

That property has thick woods on it. I hope they do right by designing the building into the woods without tearing all the trees out. It be nice if they would just carve out room for the buildings and parking then leave as many of trees as possible on the land.

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I agree. It's quite thick. I'm curious what's out there now. I see all kinds of birds and small mammals on the periphery.

No telling what all lives in there. Might even be some people living out there.

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Texas911,

It’s not just an educational facility, it also will serve the community as healthcare center. I’m very sure the administration considered multiple location options. Makes sense to keep the school somewhat removed so that it doesn’t get bogged down in traffic, for people who are just seeking care.

To call the location just “dumb” doesn’t make you sound very considerate. 

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Its just that there's a world class medical center in our backyard but instead of participating in it we choose to go at it alone? Heck, Rice doesn't have a Med school but they have a building in the med center, as do a number of schools.

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The emphasis is on providing primary care to an underserved area. I don't believe the TMC could be viewed as underserved. 

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I am on an unrelated Board for U of H, but we were briefed a number of times on the Medical school and choosing the location was a tough, but very well consider decision.  They seriously considered being in the Medical Center and even identified an available piece of land, but in the end the choice was to be near campus to reinforce the ties to the university.

 

As for the exact location and preserving the trees, I'm afraid that whole area will probably be developed over time.  If you're not familiar with the U of H area, the campus is pretty hemmed in on the north by I-45, the east by the railroad tracks (with the exception of the Innovation Center (ex. Schlumberger facility) which is really a separate location) and the south by viable residential in University Oaks/Riverside Terrace.  So I think that area of land to the southeast is destined to become part of the campus.  There is political pressure from Third Ward leaders for U of H to not expand to the west as they feel that it would diminish the historically African American nature of the neighborhood.  Plus TSU and Yates High School are right there on the border already.  There is some room to expand to the north right up against I-45, but that land is currently serving as sports fields and personally I think that's a good idea as intramural sports add to the University experience and the mind boggling to me 6000+ students who live on-campus need recreation areas. 

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38 minutes ago, innerloop said:

I am on an unrelated Board for U of H, but we were briefed a number of times on the Medical school and choosing the location was a tough, but very well consider decision.  They seriously considered being in the Medical Center and even identified an available piece of land, but in the end the choice was to be near campus to reinforce the ties to the university.

 

As for the exact location and preserving the trees, I'm afraid that whole area will probably be developed over time.  If you're not familiar with the U of H area, the campus is pretty hemmed in on the north by I-45, the east by the railroad tracks (with the exception of the Innovation Center (ex. Schlumberger facility) which is really a separate location) and the south by viable residential in University Oaks/Riverside Terrace.  So I think that area of land to the southeast is destined to become part of the campus.  There is political pressure from Third Ward leaders for U of H to not expand to the west as they feel that it would diminish the historically African American nature of the neighborhood.  Plus TSU and Yates High School are right there on the border already.  There is some room to expand to the north right up against I-45, but that land is currently serving as sports fields and personally I think that's a good idea as intramural sports add to the University experience and the mind-boggling to me 6000+ students who live on-campus need recreation areas. 

Based on rendering it looks like they are going to carve out room in the trees for the building and parking lot. I just hope they do this with any future expansions on the land. The campus they are building in Pearland is being built with maintaining foliage in mind. Also, I believe there is a chunk of the land in the flood plain so they can not build on some of it anyway. 

 

 

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49 minutes ago, innerloop said:

As for the exact location and preserving the trees, I'm afraid that whole area will probably be developed over time.  If you're not familiar with the U of H area, the campus is pretty hemmed in on the north by I-45, the east by the railroad tracks (with the exception of the Innovation Center (ex. Schlumberger facility) which is really a separate location) and the south by viable residential in University Oaks/Riverside Terrace.  So I think that area of land to the southeast is destined to become part of the campus.  There is political pressure from Third Ward leaders for U of H to not expand to the west as they feel that it would diminish the historically African American nature of the neighborhood.  

 

North:  I always hope that UH can somehow get all of the land east of Scott and west of the RR tracks up to 45.  Buying Wholesale Electric and the old falling down homes north of Elgin would be awesome.

 

West:  I guess I could understand that pressure from the community if UH was all one race but, as it is one of the most diverse schools in the world, it seems like the pressure is to keep a neighborhood one race instead of many.

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16 hours ago, texas911 said:

That's a dumb place to put a medical school. Separated from the main campus AND the TMC. Turning its back on resources that is existing already and could attract great students!

 

 

Don't forget HBU!

Not really.  It the perfect location for the Med School due to proximity from TMC and it will serve the 3rd Ward community so that location is easily accessible.  

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On 8/22/2019 at 8:19 AM, innerloop said:

I am on an unrelated Board for U of H, but we were briefed a number of times on the Medical school and choosing the location was a tough, but very well consider decision.  They seriously considered being in the Medical Center and even identified an available piece of land, but in the end the choice was to be near campus to reinforce the ties to the university.

 

As for the exact location and preserving the trees, I'm afraid that whole area will probably be developed over time.  If you're not familiar with the U of H area, the campus is pretty hemmed in on the north by I-45, the east by the railroad tracks (with the exception of the Innovation Center (ex. Schlumberger facility) which is really a separate location) and the south by viable residential in University Oaks/Riverside Terrace.  So I think that area of land to the southeast is destined to become part of the campus.  There is political pressure from Third Ward leaders for U of H to not expand to the west as they feel that it would diminish the historically African American nature of the neighborhood.  Plus TSU and Yates High School are right there on the border already.  There is some room to expand to the north right up against I-45, but that land is currently serving as sports fields and personally I think that's a good idea as intramural sports add to the University experience and the mind boggling to me 6000+ students who live on-campus need recreation areas. 

 

Thanks for the insight, especially for those posters that thought my post had no credibility in regards to having the med school located in the World Renowned Texas Medical Center. Seems the powers that be also thought that it was a good idea. 

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On 8/21/2019 at 5:20 PM, texas911 said:

That's a dumb place to put a medical school. Separated from the main campus AND the TMC. Turning its back on resources that is existing already and could attract great students!

 

 

Don't forget HBU!

Disagree.  I  travel that area daily.  It  a straight shot into the TMC without  having to get on the Highway. It  a 5 min metro ride back to the main campus. It very present could is adding to a area that growing.  I remember when that area was a ghost town with a few fast food places and a store. Now there a ton of fast food places. a number of black owned  businesses . A huge club / lounge that quite popular with the college age and early 30s crowd.  Only things missing is residential  and these still a number of land plots available for even that.

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Posted (edited)
13 minutes ago, texas911 said:

 

Thanks for the insight, especially for those posters that thought my post had no credibility in regards to having the med school located in the World Renowned Texas Medical Center. Seems the powers that be also thought that it was a good idea. 

I didn't read one quote that said your idea was not credible. What I read were the explanations of why it was chosen. 

You were the one that started this by saying it was a dumb place to put the school. Maybe if you had dug a little and understood why they decided to build where they are, you wouldn't have said something derogatory and not sounded like you had no knowledge of the thoughtful consideration that was taken in coming up with their decision.I think that Jmitch94 and arbpro made it very clear why they chose where they did.

Edited by bobruss
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2 hours ago, texas911 said:

 

Thanks for the insight, especially for those posters that thought my post had no credibility in regards to having the med school located in the World Renowned Texas Medical Center. Seems the powers that be also thought that it was a good idea. 

You are in error. The school has long wanted a medical school. When the idea was finally facing fruition, the University considered all options, including the TMC. When it was decided that the focus would be on primary care for an underserved area, the TMC option was no longer viable. The school then proceeded with its business plan idea which had the side benefit of allowing the medical school to be near the main campus. Apparently you think that was a bad idea. What you are really saying is that you think having a medical school dedicated to primary care in a need location is a bad idea. 

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Posted (edited)
39 minutes ago, arbpro said:

You are in error. The school has long wanted a medical school. When the idea was finally facing fruition, the University considered all options, including the TMC. When it was decided that the focus would be on primary care for an underserved area, the TMC option was no longer viable. The school then proceeded with its business plan idea which had the side benefit of allowing the medical school to be near the main campus. Apparently you think that was a bad idea. What you are really saying is that you think having a medical school dedicated to primary care in a need location is a bad idea. 

 

3 minutes ago, cougarpad said:

The UH administration also thought it would be better if the med school was located on campus so that there could be a collaboration with other colleges on campus. Also by building the med school on campus, it assists in the accreditation of the whole UH main campus as one and especially towards more tier 1 and academic awards.

 

3 minutes ago, cougarpad said:

 

 

Edited by cougarpad

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You guys are unbelievable. One, I'm not against UH getting a medical school, I'm a proud alum, so let's get that out of the way. But I'll clue you in on why the Texas Medical Center became the juggernaut that its become. Its because its land locked. All the member institutions had no choice but to build next to each other and that critical mass of sharing, exchanging, pooling of employees, physicians, scientists is why the TMC is so great. Really, others have tried to replicate it but without success. Do you think the Debakey/Cooley rivalry could have occurred if they were opposite sides of town, for example? Maybe, but it sure didn't hurt them being right next to each other. It would have been much better to have the medical school participate in this. That's all I'm saying. But there was a lot of back room politics to get the state to approve the school, so who knows, maybe locating it in an "underserved" area that several posters point out is just minutes form the TMC (where you can get as much underserved patients as you want, I'm looking at you Ben Taub), was the only way for UT the state allow it. 

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Posted (edited)

While that sounds great, I think it is great that UH is building the medical school on campus to increase the perspective of UH as a medical college. Texas A&M, Baylor and UT have longevity. UH can attain similar status maybe but it is not quite there yet. Let’s build up our medical program on campus and then expand to TMC later on and more community involvement with the university in the 3rd ward is always a positive thing.

Also these other colleges have a ton of more money than UH. Land is cheaper in 3rd ward.

Edited by ZRFkris
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2 hours ago, texas911 said:

You guys are unbelievable. One, I'm not against UH getting a medical school, I'm a proud alum, so let's get that out of the way. But I'll clue you in on why the Texas Medical Center became the juggernaut that its become. Its because its land locked. All the member institutions had no choice but to build next to each other and that critical mass of sharing, exchanging, pooling of employees, physicians, scientists is why the TMC is so great. Really, others have tried to replicate it but without success. Do you think the Debakey/Cooley rivalry could have occurred if they were opposite sides of town, for example? Maybe, but it sure didn't hurt them being right next to each other. It would have been much better to have the medical school participate in this. That's all I'm saying. But there was a lot of back room politics to get the state to approve the school, so who knows, maybe locating it in an "underserved" area that several posters point out is just minutes form the TMC (where you can get as much underserved patients as you want, I'm looking at you Ben Taub), was the only way for UT the state allow it. 

I worked at TMC for 22 years. One advantage the UH Med School will most likely have in its location, is much better parking. Parking at TMC is expensive and if your  cheapskate like me, a long walk.

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Between flooding issues with the old building, not to mention it just being generally pretty grim (even when Brutalist was fashionable), this is a positive development.

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22 hours ago, hindesky said:

Quad. Parking garage is open.

bXtssNV.jpg

 

 

It's a shame they knocked down the old quads instead of renovating them. This new building looks pretty soul-less and generic and isn't going to age well. From the sounds of it, they're going to make the same mistake with Moody.

Edited by htine
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Well the quads definitely sucked the soul out of you if you lived in them so...

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