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Rice Hotel

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JFK spent his last night on earth in the Rice Hotel in Houston. Does anyone know what that room is used for now that the Rice has been converted to lofts? Does someone live in it, is it a museum or a storage closet?

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JFK spent his last night on earth in the Rice Hotel in Houston. Does anyone know what that room is used for now that the Rice has been converted to lofts? Does someone live in it, is it a museum or a storage closet?

not much to go on (and nothing too detailed), but this site mentions it:

http://www.lonestarspirits.org/haunthouston.html

The room in which John F. Kennedy spent his last night on Earth has been home to cold spots, rattling doors & beds as well as balls of light. Perhaps the ghost of the late President is making himself known. Ghost dancers have been seen in the ballroom, and one of our own team members saw a lady in white pacing where the balcony USED to be.

and here's a picture of the room:

http://pictopia.com/perl/gal?process=galle...=houston:131181

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I guess Houston and FW do have something in common,both are where JFK spent his last night on earth.

The hotel in FW I THOUGHT was his last is very creepy.

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not much to go on (and nothing too detailed), but this site mentions it:

http://www.lonestarspirits.org/haunthouston.html

The room in which John F. Kennedy spent his last night on Earth has been home to cold spots, rattling doors & beds as well as balls of light. Perhaps the ghost of the late President is making himself known. Ghost dancers have been seen in the ballroom, and one of our own team members saw a lady in white pacing where the balcony USED to be.

and here's a picture of the room:

http://pictopia.com/perl/gal?process=galle...=houston:131181

JFK used the International Suite on the 5th floor of the Rice to change clothes and rest before going to the Coliseum.

He spent his last night in Rm. 850 of the Texas Hotel in Ft. Worth.

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JFK used the International Suite on the 5th floor of the Rice to change clothes and rest before going to the Coliseum.

He spent his last night in Rm. 850 of the Texas Hotel in Ft. Worth.

That's correct...spoke to hundreds at a Breakfast in the Hotel Ballroom, and then went outside to speak to the crowd there in what is now Sundance Square. His last speech. He and Jackie flew to Dallas, where as we all know, he was shot before he made it to the luncheon at the Trade Mart.

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family history has it that JFK spoke here(sorry, I don't remember,was an infant) and then left for Dallas. Cut to early 2000's, was looking at apts in the Rice Lofts-I was shown an apt on the 13th floor(!) and it had a plaque on the inside of the door naming it the JFK Suite-the last place that he spent the night here. The rental agent said that they were not renting it at the time as they were having "problems" with the AC(!!)

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family history has it that JFK spoke here(sorry, I don't remember,was an infant) and then left for Dallas. Cut to early 2000's, was looking at apts in the Rice Lofts-I was shown an apt on the 13th floor(!) and it had a plaque on the inside of the door naming it the JFK Suite-the last place that he spent the night here. The rental agent said that they were not renting it at the time as they were having "problems" with the AC(!!)

See post #4...and welcome!

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This makes me sad, but it's another symptom of our growing wealth gap (currently about 9% of Americans control 50% of the wealth). When the upper class views the lower class as a completely separate society, they have no incentive to enjoy mingling with them in shared spaces.

 

http://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/columnists/sarnoff/article/The-once-open-Rice-lobby-now-a-private-space-6350230.php?t=578f70d002&cmpid=twitter-premium

 

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This makes me sad, but it's another symptom of our growing wealth gap (currently about 9% of Americans control 50% of the wealth). When the upper class views the lower class as a completely separate society, they have no incentive to enjoy mingling with them in shared spaces.

 

http://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/columnists/sarnoff/article/The-once-open-Rice-lobby-now-a-private-space-6350230.php?t=578f70d002&cmpid=twitter-premium

 

I would think it unusual if any residence-only building allowed the general public to go in and out of its lobby space without a reason to be there.  Given their location, I'd be surprised if they did not get a lot of coffee shop/Chipotle patrons and homeless wandering in and making themselves comfortable that they would have to ask to leave on a very frequent basis. 

 

I don't see it as a shared space, it's a private business that doesn't get any bump from foot traffic.  But then again, I don't get much out of mingling with anyone regardless of class.

Edited by Nate99
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They have to let Minuti shoppers use the lobby though; there's no restroom in the store itself

 

Shay McElroy's also, i believe.

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Its not exclusive to Houston too, or that building. I was just in New York for a week, and most residential buildings and even big commercial highrise you couldn't access the major portions of the lobby. It is a shame though. I think there could have been a compromise where the bottom floor was a public access lobby and the 2nd floor was an exclusive lobby for the residence, but oh well.

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I would think it unusual if any residence-only building allowed the general public to go in and out of its lobby space without a reason to be there.  Given their location, I'd be surprised if they did not get a lot of coffee shop/Chipotle patrons and homeless wandering in and making themselves comfortable that they would have to ask to leave on a very frequent basis. 

 

I don't see it as a shared space, it's a private business that doesn't get any bump from foot traffic.  But then again, I don't get much out of mingling with anyone regardless of class.

 

Fair enough, except it's not strictly speaking a residence-only building. The Lawless bar on the second floor (formerly the State Bar) is open to the public. And as mentioned previously, there are several street-level businesses adjacent to the Rice that don't have restrooms, so the only way they're allowed to operate is if their patrons have access to the restrooms in the lobby. I wonder how the Rice plans to identify patrons of those businesses as opposed to _verboten_ commoners intent on loitering in the lobby until they can plant an Occupy flag in a potted ficus? Maybe via restroom/hall passes, like in high school?

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The lobby has been for residents only for months with no problem. The businesses still utilize the bathrooms. No clue why this article just came out.

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I would think it unusual if any residence-only building allowed the general public to go in and out of its lobby space without a reason to be there.  Given their location, I'd be surprised if they did not get a lot of coffee shop/Chipotle patrons and homeless wandering in and making themselves comfortable that they would have to ask to leave on a very frequent basis. 

 

I don't see it as a shared space, it's a private business that doesn't get any bump from foot traffic.  But then again, I don't get much out of mingling with anyone regardless of class.

 

They allowed people to walk through the lobby for twenty years after the original renovation, and I don't know of any problems that ever came of it. The spokesman of the company didn't cite any problems, such as homeless coming in.  It's true that most residential buildings don't invite the public into the lobbies, but this building was unique in that it was Houston's most famous hotel for generations, and a lot of people have memories of it. Randall Davis, who redeveloped it in the 90's, speaks with pride in the article of the lobby being a space that people could step into and appreciate. Too bad his civic spirit is not more shared.

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I was just at Chipotle yesterday and used the restroom with no problem. The lobby looks great! Very high end and like any complex should protect it. Made me want to look at it as my next place.

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