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In the late 50s , I remember a large orphanage on the way to Galveston . I was eight or nine and my Cub Scout group would go there sometime to bring gifts to the kids etc. . Of course I remember it as a big , gloomy place . Where exactly was this building? Old Galveston rd. or Gulf Freeway ? When did it stop being an orphanage ?

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In the late 50s , I remember a large orphanage on the way to Galveston . I was eight or nine and my Cub Scout group would go there sometime to bring gifts to the kids etc. . Of course I remember it as a big , gloomy place . Where exactly was this building? Old Galveston rd. or Gulf Freeway ? When did it stop being an orphanage ?

I've lived here a long time but I don't remember an orphanage on Old Galveston Rd or the Gulf Freeway, but I do remember two other possible answers to your query. There was the Harris County Home for Boys on old FM 528 -- now NASA Parkway -- on Clear Lake near the Jim West Mansion. It was a big and gloomy looking old building that looked like something out of a Charles Dickens novel. It was torn down in the sixties and replaced by a modern juvenile detention center that looked like a school with dormitories. I don't think the county owns it anymore.

Another possibility is the old Moody Hall Orphanage on Avenue Q in Galveston. It was the first building occupied by Galveston College when it opened in the late 60s. The building is still there on the college campus, and it's still called Moody Hall. Here's something I cut and pasted off the Galveston College website.

http://www.gc.edu/gc/GC_History.asp?SnID=61237

"For the opening of the College in September 1967, through the spring of 1970, the College occupied Moody Hall, a refurbished orphanage, as its only campus facility. The initial academic offerings were fairly broad in scope, while the occupational program was minimal but with strong offerings in vocational nursing, office occupations, engineering/drafting and law enforcement."

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With high hopes the Board Nazi's don't come gunning for me, I am responding not to topic, but what Filio added above. With a big thank you, you have finally filled in my jigsaw puzzle.

In 1947-48, I attended a GSA camp, Camp Tejas, just off Clear Lake on Taylor Lake I believe. We walked just south of the cabins and explored a eerie mansion with swimming pool decorated with wonderful colorful tiles. Memory had slipped on the name of the Estate and Filio just hit it right on the head. I give you the Jim West Mansion:

WestMansion.jpg

JimWestEstate.jpg

The really cool thing is the surviving family took off leaving sheets on beds, utensils in kitchen, drapes up, etc. To us little girls it was ghostly, peeking through the windows it seems all the people had just disappeared into thin air mysteriously.

Possibly last chance to view it, Haakim bought it and it may soon be high rise condos.

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With high hopes the Board Nazi's don't come gunning for me, I am responding not to topic, but what Filio added above. With a big thank you, you have finally filled in my jigsaw puzzle. In 1947-48, I attended a GSA camp, Camp Tejas, just off Clear Lake on Taylor Lake I believe. We walked just south of the cabins and explored a eerie mansion with swimming pool decorated with wonderful colorful tiles. Memory had slipped on the name of the Estate and Filio just hit it right on the head. I give you the Jim West Mansion:

Thanks WestU. I do what I can, and I live to serve others.

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In 1947-48, I attended a GSA camp, Camp Tejas, just off Clear Lake on Taylor Lake I believe.

I'll also risk the wrath of the thread Nazis...

Did this GSA camp have a large old house (mansion) constructed of concrete? I recall a controversy a few years ago about the GSA's decision to raze it, to the dismay of preservationists. Or was that structure located elsewhere?

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Not in my day. It was the usual woodsy camp set up with wooden cabins with vast areas of screening instead of windows sprinkled about and a large one story lodge type hall, also log cabin type for meals, activities, etc. Then the only other building I remember was the communal bathroom with shower facilities. One night I had to venture out to the bathroom and mostly asleep didn't put on shoes, but woke up quite suddenly when I stepped on a snake along the way.

This was very long ago, while the Scouts had it they may have built a building such as you describe down the line. In the late 1960's, while boating on Clear Lake, I spotted some of the old cabins at water's edge still standing, but obviously abandoned.

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I'll also risk the wrath of the thread Nazis...

Did this GSA camp have a large old house (mansion) constructed of concrete? I recall a controversy a few years ago about the GSA's decision to raze it, to the dismay of preservationists. Or was that structure located elsewhere?

That is Camp Casa Mare on Galveston Bay in Seabrook. The mansion, called the "Big House" by the Girl Scouts, was built around 1912 and demolished in the early 90's. Otherwise it is still an active Girl Scout Camp. The old mansion had an interesting and varied history and at least one ghost associated with it.

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In the late 50s , I remember a large orphanage on the way to Galveston . I was

I grew up in Sharpstown (apparently near an orphanage) and over the years from attending Sutton Elem., Jane Long JH, and SHS, I met quite a few aqaintenances. It sucks that they could not contact me after they were gone.

Does anyone know what orphanage that might be?

And by the way..........we ARE in the next century.....why haven't WE, (As The People) given this type of hopeful place a more respectable name? ~global

Edited by enviromain
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And by the way..........we ARE in the next century.....why haven't WE, (As The People) given this type of hopeful place a more respectable name? ~global

What's wrong with "orphanage"? I've never regarded the words "orphan" and "orphanage" as derogatory terms, and until the age of Political Correctness, nobody else did either.

"Orphan" is not a slang term or a slur. It's a perfectly respectable word that comes from Greek, and it means "someone who has lost one or both parents through death.

"Orphan" is not a slang term or a slur and it's not pejorative. You seem to think it's disrespectful to call parentless children orphans, and a group home that cares for them as an "orphanage". Why?

Now, if just have to weed out the derogatory old words, why don't you go after the word "daughter". It comes from an old English Saxon term for the female member of the family responsible for milking the cows. Clearly it's a word for a subservient family member.

Edited by FilioScotia
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What's wrong with "orphanage"? I've never regarded the words "orphan" and "orphanage" as derogatory terms, and until the age of Political Correctness, nobody else did either.

"Orphan" is not a slang term or a slur. It's a perfectly respectable word that comes from Greek, and it means "someone who has lost one or both parents through death.

"Orphan" is not a slang term or a slur and it's not pejorative. You seem to think it's disrespectful to call parentless children orphans, and a group home that cares for them as an "orphanage". Why?

Now, if just have to weed out the derogatory old words, why don't you go after the word "daughter". It comes from an old English Saxon term for the female member of the family responsible for milking the cows. Clearly it's a word for a subservient family member.

Well 'orphanage' may not be a derogatory word, but to live in a place called by a word that means, "a place for a bunch of kids who's parents have died", isn't very hopeful at all... :(

Now, concerning the word 'daughter', I wonder if that was what Pearl Jam was writing about? :D I never did understand that song...

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Well 'orphanage' may not be a derogatory word, but to live in a place called by a word that means, "a place for a bunch of kids who's parents have died", isn't very hopeful at all... :(

Is it any worse than "nursing home"? Or Mental Hospital? How would you like to live in a place called by words that mean you can't take care of yourself anymore? Come on people. Get a grip.

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Is it any worse than "nursing home"? Or Mental Hospital? How would you like to live in a place called by words that mean you can't take care of yourself anymore? Come on people. Get a grip.

Nursing home? I know, I know, terrible!! Mental Hospital? Who would want to live in a place that means you are sick in the head? Oh, the shame! Who made up those terms? Those are just awful and downright mean.

You're absolutely right. I wouldn't want to live at either of those places. Do you live in one of those? :P

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Is it any worse than "nursing home"? Or Mental Hospital?

The other term for orphanage is orphan asylum. You just don't get it, do you Filio?

My orphaned friends did not like the name of their housing units; coming from the source, I think that's a "given."

ROYM is right to say that orphanage symbolizes "a place for a bunch of kids who's parents have died" - or - have been abandoned.

Why do OUR living units get nice names ????

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Nursing home? I know, I know, terrible!! Mental Hospital? Who would want to live in a place that means you are sick in the head? Oh, the shame! Who made up those terms? Those are just awful and downright mean.

You're absolutely right. I wouldn't want to live at either of those places. Do you live in one of those? :P

LOLLL....With four children, there are times when I think I'm living in a nuthouse, and find myself wishing I could live in a nursing home. I'm ready for the home now.

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I remember an orphanage on the Gulf Freeway also. It was called "Dyer Home" and was on the east side of the freeway near the Old Choate Rd. overpass, now Scarsdale (I think). It went away in the mid 60's. It was

pretty stark looking architecturally, nothing like Bayland on Chimney Rock or the Harris County Boys Home

on NASA Rd. 1.

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I remember an orphanage on the Gulf Freeway also. It was called "Dyer Home" and was on the east side of the freeway near the Old Choate Rd. overpass, now Scarsdale (I think). It went away in the mid 60's. It was

pretty stark looking architecturally, nothing like Bayland on Chimney Rock or the Harris County Boys Home

on NASA Rd. 1.

Thanks plumber 2 . I had accepted Filio's earlier theory that what I had remembered was actually the HC Home for Boys in Clear Lake . But , even though I was just a kid , my memory was of one on the Gulf Freeway . We lived in the Edgebrook / Freeway Manor area . So the Scarsdale location would be about right .

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I grew up in Sharpstown (apparently near an orphanage) and over the years from attending Sutton Elem., Jane Long JH, and SHS, I met quite a few aqaintenances. It sucks that they could not contact me after they were gone.

Does anyone know what orphanage that might be?

And by the way..........we ARE in the next century.....why haven't WE, (As The People) given this type of hopeful place a more respectable name? ~global

The orphanage was probably the Burnett Bayland Orhpanage on Chimney Rock Rd. These students would have diffinently gone to Jane Long Jr. High. The old structures were torn down in the early 60's, and new buildings built on the southwest corner of the county property, Clarewood and Alder (I think). Most of the property is now county offices and park facilities. The orginal buildings were quite impressive, large spanish style dormitories, similar in look to the Ft. Crockett buildings, still standing in Galveston.

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  • 7 years later...
  • 9 months later...

Hi all, before Dyer there was the Frank & Jennie Ingrando Home for Children.  I lived there from 5-11 years old, then the home moved and Dyer took over.  Later I heard that the bldg was destroyed by a firebug who turned out to be a fireman or volunteer.  If you ever hear of anyone who lived in the Ingrando, I'd sure like to know.  The home was amazing.  It was red brick and might have looked gloomy from the old 45S highway, but it was anything but gloomy.  Loved that place.  Virginia Westberry Dec 12, 2014

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Hi all, before Dyer there was the Frank & Jennie Ingrando Home for Children.  I lived there from 5-11 years old, then the home moved and Dyer took over.  Later I heard that the bldg was destroyed by a firebug who turned out to be a fireman or volunteer.  If you ever hear of anyone who lived in the Ingrando, I'd sure like to know.  The home was amazing.  It was red brick and might have looked gloomy from the old 45S highway, but it was anything but gloomy.  Loved that place.  Virginia Westberry Dec 12, 2014

 

westvir... Do you remember where exactly the red brick home was located, in relation to the Dyer one? And does that name, or those Ingrando's have anything to do with the renaming of Southmayd Park to Ingrando Park (in the East End)? Just wondering.

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From The Institute for Texan Cultures: 

 

FRANK AND JENNIE INGRANDO FOUNDATION 1951 On Saint Patrick's Day in 1950 a childless couple, Frank and Jennie Ingrando of Houston, established a foundation to provide for the care of neglected children. They were about to begin construction of a home on the Gulf Freeway when Jennie be­came incurably ill and plans had to be postponed. After her death in May 1951 Frank decided to carryon alone. He was the architect, foreman and contractor for the building, which was designed to house 100 children. As Frank said after Jennie's death: "We both wanted to see chil­dren with lots of ground around them. We wanted them to have a few ponies, flowers, chickens and a gar­den, maybe:' The home was dedicated in the summer of 1954 and was opened in 1955, but Frank Ingrando did not live to see the first children move in; he had died the previous December. The Ingrando home operated until 1962, when the original structure was sold and a smaller, more economical place was purchased. The new quar­ters were operated until 1969. By then, the state and county had as­sumed responsibility for the care of the children the Ingrando home was intended to help. The foundation continued to donate money to orga­nizations already taking care of chil­dren. It made gifts to the City of Houston for a park to be named the Frank and J ennie Ingrando Park. It gave property to finance an intensive care unit for children at St. Joseph's Hospital. It also contributed to the Houston School for the Deaf, to the Boy Scouts, to the San Jose Clinic and to other children's groups. One of the more unusual gifts was to Dominican College in Hous­ton. The gift provided for continua­tion of a special mass recited each year on September 8. The mass had its origins in the 1900 storm which destroyed Galveston. Frank's father, Ignacio Ingrando, had vowed that, if his family survived the storm, he would mark the occasion annually. The family survived, and the mass has been observed with only a few exceptions ever since. Sicilian-born Frank Ingrando was two years old when his parents immigrated to Texas in 1888. Jennie Barbera was born in America to Italian parents who had settled in Houston shortly after the Civil War. As a boy Frank worked in his father's store, then opened his own paint shop. All the while, he was buying property whenever he could. By the late 1920's the Ingrandos possessed all the material comforts they felt they would ever need, so they turned their energies toward saving and investing for the children's home. J ennie kept the books, collected the rents and counseled with Frank in real estate investments. As a result of the tax reform act of 1969, it became uneconomical to operate the foundation, and the final gifts were made in 1973. But the memory of Frank and Jennie Ingran­do will live on in the park and in other good works provided for the children of Houston.

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Interesting information, looked like a pretty big home, to me. The second location must have been very large. I don't recall seeing either one. My dad used to point out many landmarks nearby, such as Ellington Field, with all those white barracks, but, he never mentioned these two places. It's nice to know the history of the Ingrando family.  I frequented that park many times, as a kid.  

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NenaE, Ingrando Home was located on the east side of 45S right before the Ellington overpass.  It had a black iron arch that said "The Ingrando Home for Children".  The superindent's name was Ida M. Brooks but we all called her Granny.  She was assisted by Effie Mae (cook) her husband, Booker T (grounds keeper, handman, etc.), two housemothers and a relief.  Granny, Effie Mae, and Booker T were always there; whereas the other housemothers would come and go.  Effie Mae was a southern style cook and no one I know of has been able to top her skill.  The Inrando moved when I was 11yrs to a mansion on South Park Blvd.  It was MUCH smaller and we no longer had the fields to wander in.  Dyer took over the original Ingrando building and later I heard it was the one of the buildings the fireman firebug torched. It was vacant then, I think. When I get enough nerve, I'll look at the news link MARMER provided. Out of all the institutions I was in and out of, the Ingrando was the longest (6 years) and the best.  Most unusual place.  As far as Ingrando Park, yes I've read about the many contributions from the Ingrando Foundation.  You can find more online.  Did you know anyone there or were you there?  Virginia Westberry Dec 19, 2014   

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NenaE, Ingrando Home was located on the east side of 45S right before the Ellington overpass.  It had a black iron arch that said "The Ingrando Home for Children".  The superindent's name was Ida M. Brooks but we all called her Granny.  She was assisted by Effie Mae (cook) her husband, Booker T (grounds keeper, handman, etc.), two housemothers and a relief.  Granny, Effie Mae, and Booker T were always there; whereas the other housemothers would come and go.  Effie Mae was a southern style cook and no one I know of has been able to top her skill.  The Inrando moved when I was 11yrs to a mansion on South Park Blvd.  It was MUCH smaller and we no longer had the fields to wander in.  Dyer took over the original Ingrando building and later I heard it was the one of the buildings the fireman firebug torched. It was vacant then, I think. When I get enough nerve, I'll look at the news link MARMER provided. Out of all the institutions I was in and out of, the Ingrando was the longest (6 years) and the best.  Most unusual place.  As far as Ingrando Park, yes I've read about the many contributions from the Ingrando Foundation.  You can find more online.  Did you know anyone there or were you there?  Virginia Westberry Dec 19, 2014   

 

Wonderful recollection... thank you for sharing. No, I didn't, and I don't know anyone else who went there. Just can't believe I had never heard go these places. I'm a sixties child, come from a long line of East Enders and Bay Area visitors.

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  • 6 months later...

NenaE, Ingrando Home was located on the east side of 45S right before the Ellington overpass.   

 

Some of the kids from the Ingrando home went to Genoa Elementary and I think some of the boys were in the Genoa Cub and Scout programs.

 

I grew up in the 'suburbs' of Genoa (laughing) 

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  • 2 years later...
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I lived at the Ingrando home from age 5 or 6 to age 11 or 12. From around 59 to 65. I remember Granny, Effie and Booker T. We also had a house mother we called Mama Carter. There were 6 other children I remember. My name was Darline Richardson and I had 2 sisters Donna and Beth. There was James, William and Lois Rathjen and Mitchell Wall. I don’t recall any others. Darline Richardson Jones 

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  • 3 months later...

I went to Genoa Elementary 4th and 5 6th grades and I was at Ingrando. Mrs. Dumas was my Teacher 5th grade.

My two brothers were also there Steven and Gary Homan, my name is Charlotte Ann Homan Surbeck, I live in Switzerland, 

I would love to find others from Ingrando....

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  • 4 months later...

My mother grew up in Galveston and was  put in the orphanage from the time she was 13, until she graduated Ball High at 18. (1956/57 until 1960/61) I would love to get more information regarding this orphanage during that time or talk to someone that was there the same time she was. My mother’s experience was not bad, but her younger sister, not so great. They separated my mom and my aunt on different floors due to their age. (My mother was 13 and my aunt only 9 years old) Should have never been done. My aunt should have been allowed to stay with my mom, but I suppose they didn’t want the older girls with the younger...not sure. Would love to speak to someone that knows a lot about the orphanage during that time..

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1 hour ago, Kindall said:

My mother grew up in Galveston and was  put in the orphanage from the time she was 13, until she graduated Ball High at 18. (1956/57 until 1960/61) I would love to get more information regarding this orphanage during that time or talk to someone that was there the same time she was. My mother’s experience was not bad, but her younger sister, not so great. They separated my mom and my aunt on different floors due to their age. (My mother was 13 and my aunt only 9 years old) Should have never been done. My aunt should have been allowed to stay with my mom, but I suppose they didn’t want the older girls with the younger...not sure. Would love to speak to someone that knows a lot about the orphanage during that time..

All my children were in orphanages in Siberia. Our twin daughters were in a pre-WW I building. It was nasty and has been replaced with a new one. Our son from a newer orphange. I don't know what life is like for Americans after they leave the orphanage, but it isn't too bright in Russia. It's a tough country to grow up in. Their GDP is smaller than Texas.

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