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Aga Khan Foundation: Islamic Community Center, First In U.S


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Quick search and tada- first look thanks to someone from the landscape side of this. https://issuu.com/cthogge/docs/210221_hogge-portfolio-pages

first upload was hard to see, i colored over the lines so they stand out:

Looking at google earth, there is a clear shot from May of 2020 in which the buildings laid out??    

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I'd be SO sad if it was torn down...but I've been preparing my self. I love that building! but, it is too much of a prime location to keep sitting vacant. I figure the building must be pretty damaged, otherwise it would be lofts by now...

I think I'll need to take some pics to remember it by...

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I'd be SO sad if it was torn down...but I've been preparing my self. I love that building! but, it is too much of a prime location to keep sitting vacant. I figure the building must be pretty damaged, otherwise it would be lofts by now...

I think I'll need to take some pics to remember it by...

yeah, this would be the time to do that -

i think the company name that's doing the abatement is texas environmental controls (?)

i wonder if they would/could offer any information...

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Hello,

I am new to this website and if this question has already been answered, then I am sorry. What is going to be built at Montrose and Dallas? I notice that the demo has begun on the old building towards Dallas. The large old Sears building that faces Allen Pkwy has yet to be touched. I live next door and was just curious to what is going to be built there.

Thanks!

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Yes that's the one. It is on the corner of Dallas and Montrose. They are building new townhomes across the street. The building and most of the old concrete parking lot is demolished and has been hauled away. I am going to walk my dog by there tonight and try and read the permit posted. We could use some retail over in that area other than the Chevron. ;)

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Yes that's the one. It is on the corner of Dallas and Montrose. They are building new townhomes across the street. The building and most of the old concrete parking lot is demolished and has been hauled away. I am going to walk my dog by there tonight and try and read the permit posted. We could use some retail over in that area other than the Chevron. ;)

archstone smith owns the site and are planning to do apartments.

across the street is not townhomes but more apartments. originally owned by farb, mccombs purchased his plans and will develop around +/- 400 units.

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  • 2 weeks later...
archstone smith owns the site and are planning to do apartments.

across the street is not townhomes but more apartments. originally owned by farb, mccombs purchased his plans and will develop around +/- 400 units.

This backs up to the old Robertson Public Warehouse. The warehouse's location and the building you are talking about on the south side of Buffalo Bayou is why Southern Pacific had to build the railroad bridge across the bayou way back when. The wooden bridge was torn down not so long ago. The concrete abuttments are still visible on either side of the bayou if you look close enough. The bridge was kind of a landmark.....too bad!

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It is being torn down and turned into a Muslim center. See today's Chronicle:

http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/headli...iz/4337706.html

Muslim center planned for Allen Parkway

By NANCY SARNOFF

Copyright 2006 Houston Chronicle

The Aga Khan Foundation has purchased an 11.3-acre parcel of land along Allen Parkway and Montrose, including the historic Robinson Warehouse.

The international development nonprofit organization plans to build an Ismaili Center on the property. The facility will be similar to existing Muslim centers in Vancouver, London and Lisbon. It will include a prayer hall, classrooms, offices and a multipurpose social hall, said Zahir Janmohamed, CEO of the Aga Khan Council for the USA.

The design concept and development timeline have not been determined.

The property, which runs along Montrose from Allen Parkway to West Dallas, includes the Robinson Warehouse at 2323 Allen Parkway The 1920s building was the first Sears department store in Houston, according to the Greater Houston Preservation Alliance. It will be demolished to make room for the new project.

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It is being torn down and turned into a Muslim center. See today's Chronicle:

http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/headli...iz/4337706.html

Muslim center planned for Allen Parkway

By NANCY SARNOFF

Copyright 2006 Houston Chronicle

The Aga Khan Foundation has purchased an 11.3-acre parcel of land along Allen Parkway and Montrose, including the historic Robinson Warehouse.

The international development nonprofit organization plans to build an Ismaili Center on the property. The facility will be similar to existing Muslim centers in Vancouver, London and Lisbon. It will include a prayer hall, classrooms, offices and a multipurpose social hall, said Zahir Janmohamed, CEO of the Aga Khan Council for the USA.

The design concept and development timeline have not been determined.

The property, which runs along Montrose from Allen Parkway to West Dallas, includes the Robinson Warehouse at 2323 Allen Parkway The 1920s building was the first Sears department store in Houston, according to the Greater Houston Preservation Alliance. It will be demolished to make room for the new project.

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It is being torn down and turned into a Muslim center. See today's Chronicle:

http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/headli...iz/4337706.html

Muslim center planned for Allen Parkway

By NANCY SARNOFF

Copyright 2006 Houston Chronicle

The Aga Khan Foundation has purchased an 11.3-acre parcel of land along Allen Parkway and Montrose, including the historic Robinson Warehouse.

I hate to see the old warehouse go, but I like what we'll be getting. I'd say its worth it.

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We are losing the war on sleeping in, I can assure you of that! I just moved into the Bel-Air and my unit faces the demolition. Metal sure makes a screeching sound as its folded for hauling off. On the bright side, the call to worship might be able to replace my alarm clock...

I bet it will be a well designed building. With the price that they paid (north of $80 psf), it surely wont be tiltwall construction.

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We are losing the war on sleeping in, I can assure you of that! I just moved into the Bel-Air and my unit faces the demolition. Metal sure makes a screeching sound as its folded for hauling off. On the bright side, the call to worship might be able to replace my alarm clock...

I bet it will be a well designed building. With the price that they paid (north of $80 psf), it surely wont be tiltwall construction.

Topics merged.

Well, look on the bright side; you might be in a very safe spot if we ever have a terrorist attack in Houston! (a joke people, just a little joke)

Ah well, I hate to see the old warehouse go down like so many other neat buildings but I have to keep reminding myself where I am and that architecture is attached to buildings, which are attached to land, which can be valuable. I have more of a collector mentality, I suppose.

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Only in Houston would you have United Way headquartered across the bayou from a Federal Reserve Branch, public housing, a funeral company headquarters, and now an Ismaili center.

Love it!

Danax - I thought Downtown would be saved because of the Islamic Center on Main? :P

I hadn't noticed, but that does make for an interesting cluster...

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You paid about $550 for labor, my friend. Know anyone who's handy with tools?

I know. It was many hours of welding, the sheet metal was gone. I've worked on many cars in the past but now have no tools and no garage.

Back to the Sears warehouse, I would hope someone would take the time to remove and save those carved stone decorative relief panels around the building (yeah, right). Very early art deco and worthy of contemplation. I took some pics and will post them when I get home.

Here's a link to a brief history of the building.

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Not sure. Last time I drove by I thought the building was still there.

Has the demo started?

Yep. They've got the demo company and the enviro company (asbestos) on site so this is not one of those easy pickin places. The interior is being bulldozer gutted today.

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Not sure. Last time I drove by I thought the building was still there.

Has the demo started?

Yup. I drove by there an hour ago. There are two huge hole in the north side of the building. Looks like currently they are salvaging steel from inside the building. There is also a crane onsite.

Get your pictures quick.

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are the available for the taking easily?

it depends on how AAA handles it. since parts of the building are very close to busy streets, there might be a fence put up. it also depends on how fast they clean up, and what time of day they decide to work.

it is still *technically* stealing (and trespassing), though :ph34r:

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Stealing, schmealing! Just wear a hard-hart and put a flashing light on your truck.

If they are good bricks I bet they are already sold for salvage.

The best bricks I have ever found were scattered about in empty lots in Midtown. Those were some very old collector bricks. I used them to make a patio. Should have ripped them up when I moved.

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it depends on how AAA handles it. since parts of the building are very close to busy streets, there might be a fence put up. it also depends on how fast they clean up, and what time of day they decide to work.

it is still *technically* stealing (and trespassing), though :ph34r:

as i thought it would be.

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Wow. As often as I drive by there, I never really noticed the intricate brickwork.

We'll make a preservationist out of you yet, Niche. ;)

Your statement does brings to light one problem; car culture is too fast to take in architectural details like that, and that could be one reason that Houston has lost so many. New York, on the other hand, seems to have strong preservationist bloodlines. L.A....sort of.

But anyway, if more people were able to slow down and enjoy beauty like this, we might see less destruction of these treasures.

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Well, for the record, I'd still rather see a vibrant Ismaili temple than a derelict old warehouse. I like what we had but I like better what we are getting.

I've seen some new art that I think is great. That doesn't mean we have to throw away the old masterpieces.

Architecture is akin to an Indian sand painting, reminders of the transient nature of all.

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as much as I think it is very sad that we are loosing this building...it has sat vacant for so very long. It isn't like it just shut down and they didn't give it a chance as something else. I guess that is why there isn't as much of an uproar as there have been with other structures.

Thanks for the pics. I meant to get around to it, but never did. You should put them on that new wiki site i guess...

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I've seen some new art that I think is great. That doesn't mean we have to throw away the old masterpieces.

Architecture is akin to an Indian sand painting, reminders of the transient nature of all.

I kind of think of Houston's architectural environment as a an art gallery, with the corner of Allen Pkwy. and Monstrose being a prime spot. MFA-Houston, Blaffer, and Menil own some really nice works, but even they rotate out every now and then. That's all we're doing, and we do it eternally.

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I kind of think of Houston's architectural environment as a an art gallery, with the corner of Allen Pkwy. and Monstrose being a prime spot. MFA-Houston, Blaffer, and Menil own some really nice works, but even they rotate out every now and then. That's all we're doing, and we do it eternally.

Rotate, yes. Destroy history, absolutely not.

I hope everyone enjoys this new addition to the city and frequents it often.... kind of like the new Federal Reserve Building or The Royalton, right?? Both of these gems rose after historic Houston structures along Allen Parkway were demolished. But hey, who needs history??... we've got these beautiful, modern buildings that everyone just loves to take their place!! History is so overrated. Hey Houston, get the bulldozers ready for the River Oaks Theater... who needs the shoddy old piece of **** anyway.

Read sarcasm... and lots of it.

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Rotate, yes. Destroy history, absolutely not.

I hope everyone enjoys this new addition to the city and frequents it often.... kind of like the new Federal Reserve Building or The Royalton, right?? Both of these gems rose after historic Houston structures along Allen Parkway were demolished. But hey, who needs history??... we've got these beautiful, modern buildings that everyone just loves to take their place!! History is so overrated. Hey Houston, get the bulldozers ready for the River Oaks Theater... who needs the shoddy old piece of **** anyway.

Read sarcasm... and lots of it.

exactly - and the menil, mfah and so forth don't destroy the works, so all that is left is someone's snapshot (maybe).

well, heck - at least when this "cycle" comes around to these new structures, it won't be as hard to say goodbye to them <_<

Edited by sevfiv
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Rotate, yes. Destroy history, absolutely not.

I hope everyone enjoys this new addition to the city and frequents it often.... kind of like the new Federal Reserve Building or The Royalton, right?? Both of these gems rose after historic Houston structures along Allen Parkway were demolished. But hey, who needs history??... we've got these beautiful, modern buildings that everyone just loves to take their place!! History is so overrated. Hey Houston, get the bulldozers ready for the River Oaks Theater... who needs the shoddy old piece of **** anyway.

Read sarcasm... and lots of it.

Calm down, dude. Insofar as the building has been thoroughly documented and was important enough for people to remember, history has not been destroyed. Only created and expanded upon.

Life goes on.

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Calm down, dude. Insofar as the building has been thoroughly documented and was important enough for people to remember, history has not been destroyed. Only created and expanded upon.

Life goes on.

You are right about that. Life does go on... and in Houston, that means the same old wiping away of any history we ever had. I think I am entitled to express my feelings - as I was born and raised in H-town (in Montrose, in fact) - to show a little disgust and frustration that the places that are special to me have largely been destroyed to make away for mundane, if not remarkably cold, architecture (as are all of the examples I gave on Allen Parkway). Having a special place documented on paper (and, are you entirely sure about that?) or photographed for posterity brings me absolutely no comfort.

And I am so tired of the consolation we talk ourselves into... "oh, we may have lost a historic building... but look what we are getting instead!" Can we not have both?? Uhhh, sure we can.... take a look at this example.

http://www.mcmenamins.com/index.php?loc=57&id=465

Alas, we don't have the resolve - or the creativity - in our community to make projects like this one in Portland work. Forgive my rant.... I know what I am saying - esp. to The Niche - is the rambling argument of a sentimental preservationist in a city where only the rich and powerful survive. Survival of the richest in a way... our way or the highway. Well, maybe so... and I now live in Seattle where I can enjoy the history of other people in this beautiful city. It just makes me really discouraged that MY history -in Houston - is going away forever. One more building gone... another opportunity squandered.... and a part of my connection with Houston sadly removed. Selfish on my part - yes... absolutely! But it is also another nail in the coffin in understanding what Houston was... and how we got to where we are today. And as the saying goes, "those who don't understand the past are doomed to repeat it." But, life goes on....

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Michael Barry, Sekula Gibbs (bye), Carol Alvarado, et al have no clue about saving anything.

Our best hope is Mr. Peter Brown. At least he seems to get it, but until we quit electing losers nothing will change.

(This rant not inspired by this derelect warehouse, but lack of preservation in general)

And don't even get me started on Mayor "topic de jour" White.

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You are right about that. Life does go on... and in Houston, that means the same old wiping away of any history we ever had. I think I am entitled to express my feelings - as I was born and raised in H-town (in Montrose, in fact) - to show a little disgust and frustration that the places that are special to me have largely been destroyed to make away for mundane, if not remarkably cold, architecture (as are all of the examples I gave on Allen Parkway). Having a special place documented on paper (and, are you entirely sure about that?) or photographed for posterity brings me absolutely no comfort.

And a derelict, abandoned old warehouse that flooded out occaisionally was somehow less cold? I'll tell you what adds warmth to a building: use.

And I am so tired of the consolation we talk ourselves into... "oh, we may have lost a historic building... but look what we are getting instead!" Can we not have both?? Uhhh, sure we can.... take a look at this example.

http://www.mcmenamins.com/index.php?loc=57&id=465

Alas, we don't have the resolve - or the creativity - in our community to make projects like this one in Portland work. Forgive my rant.... I know what I am saying - esp. to The Niche - is the rambling argument of a sentimental preservationist in a city where only the rich and powerful survive. Survival of the richest in a way... our way or the highway. Well, maybe so... and I now live in Seattle where I can enjoy the history of other people in this beautiful city. It just makes me really discouraged that MY history -in Houston - is going away forever. One more building gone... another opportunity squandered.... and a part of my connection with Houston sadly removed. Selfish on my part - yes... absolutely! But it is also another nail in the coffin in understanding what Houston was... and how we got to where we are today. And as the saying goes, "those who don't understand the past are doomed to repeat it." But, life goes on....

I'm not impressed by Portland. Hence I don't live there.

You seem not to be capable of dealing very effectively with loss, but it is a necessary component of gain. What would a city look like if nothing were ever demolished? Or destroyed by fire or other means (and I mention this because if cities wouldn't allow demolition, many property owners would find other ways to do the job). Cities of several million people don't just pop up overnight. They grow slowly over the span of centuries. The lowest-density urban development occurs first, and it occurs in the area that will be the future central business district. In the span of a couple hundred years, what is there initially will be razed, rebuilt, then razed and rebuilt again. But if demolition isn't allowed, and development comes incrementally, then you've just made it so that every time something new needs to be built, it'll be built at the urban boundary, where there is developable land. Think about that kind of city. Is that a place that you'd want to live in? Not me.

This is just a warehouse, one like so many before it that have come and gone. Life goes on.

Edited by TheNiche
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According to the Chronicle, this site will not be apartments but ...The Aga Khan Foundation purchased just over 11 acres at the corner of Montrose and Allen Parkway to build a Muslim Ismaili center.

http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/busine...ff/4344879.html

tnt is right, that article was in the paper the other day.

site had major flood-plain issues and selling to a non-profit allows the new owner to bypass a huge tax increase.

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  • Highrise Tower changed the title to Aga Khan Foundation: Islamic Community Center, First In U.S

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