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New sculpture at Rothko Chapel

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According to The New York Times (Oct. 22, 2006), a new 20 foot-tall, 37-foot wide sculpture "constructed out of fiberglass, pulverized marble and lime cement" is to be installed on Nov. 12. The artist. Michael Somoroff. describes it as "a sculptural translation of light as it moves across the chapel." (Pictures of Illumination I can be seen on the artist's website.)

If I'm understanding this correctly, it will be installed inside of the chapel. Wonder how they'll shoehorn it in there?

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If I'm understanding this correctly, it will be installed inside of the chapel. Wonder how they'll shoehorn it in there?

i may be totally out of line but i think the chapel is fine how it is.

i've been going there for years. the one thing that is very moving

for me is that the meditative space remains the same as everything

else outside of it changes.

if installed inside i'm not sure how they could still have weddings

and funerals there.

Edited by torvald

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according to the plat on his website, it appears to be going outside.

then i wonder how long before it is tagged?

i think the only thing saving the current sculpture is that it is surrounded by water.

Edited by torvald

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According to The New York Times (Oct. 22, 2006), a new 20 foot-tall, 37-foot wide sculpture "constructed out of fiberglass, pulverized marble and lime cement" is to be installed on Nov. 12. The artist. Michael Somoroff. describes it as "a sculptural translation of light as it moves across the chapel." (Pictures of Illumination I can be seen on the artist's website.)

If I'm understanding this correctly, it will be installed inside of the chapel. Wonder how they'll shoehorn it in there?

It's going to be on the east side of the chapel.

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It's interesting that the NYT reported this but our local joke of a paper didn't take the time to include it amongst the teen beat and news wire reports. What a city...

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according to the plat on his website, it appears to be going outside.

You're right. According to the Rothko Chapel website, it will be just east of the chapel.

torvald, I'm hoping the security force can keep it free from tagging, but I wouldn't take bets either way.

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You're right. According to the Rothko Chapel website, it will be just east of the chapel.

torvald, I'm hoping the security force can keep it free from tagging, but I wouldn't take bets either way.

Do they ever have problems at the Cullen Sculpture Garden? I'd hope people have a little respect.

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Do they ever have problems at the Cullen Sculpture Garden? I'd hope people have a little respect.

there is night security at the cullen sculpture garden. i have

seen some of the sculptures near the menil tagged... forgive

me , i don't know what they're called... the geometric ones

in the park there.

plus, tagging is all about disrespect and public damage. you

can reference some of the graffiti threads on this forum.

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there is night security at the cullen sculpture garden. i have

seen some of the sculptures near the menil tagged... forgive

me , i don't know what they're called... the geometric ones

in the park there.

plus, tagging is all about disrespect and public damage. you

can reference some of the graffiti threads on this forum.

i guess i have a little faith that they would choose targets like a bus stop or street light control box instead. in the 90's the grinders made it rough for us by grinding on marble, limestone, etc on downtown building causing it to chip off. Some of the old timers made it rough for them by beating em up.

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i guess i have a little faith that they would choose targets like a bus stop or street light control box instead.

sadly, from experience, i don't.

they'll tag those things but they also tag old buildings,

murals (like the one at mary's), the red ball finials on

the new 59 bridges, shop windows, the menil sculptures...

just look at the sears building on allen parkway.

also:

Taggin is all about fame. Like when NEXT won the houston press award for best Houston tagger his fame level shot up. Or when "REBS" and "RITE" got on the news for taggin all the freeway signs and causin 10s of thousands of dollars worth of damage, their fame level shot up. And if you remember what rebs tag looked like, you'll see you don't need a lot of skill to get a lot of fame. Taggin is about gettin your piece on a 150 foot tall billboard. . .
Edited by torvald

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I think the new sculpture is going to make the best art setting experience in Texas even better.

Before the Nasher Collection was committed to the Dallas Arts District, I was kinda hoping it would make a home in the Fort Worth Cultural District, that the park next to the Kimball is perfect for a sculpture garden. A Nasher annex in Fort Worth is still on my wish list.

The park with the Rothko Chapel is just about my favorite place in Texas.

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then i wonder how long before it is tagged?

Have you ever seen the other Menil sculptures -- the ones outdoors -- tagged? (I haven't.)

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Barnet Newman's 'Broken Oblisk', in the plaza pool in front of the Rothko Chapel, was defaced with a swastika several years ago. It has since been completely refurbished and resealed and is back in place. This sculpture, which is arguably Houston's most controversial and artistically important outdoor expression, was dedicated to MLK and its defacement was a crude political act and not an ordinary 'tagging' if that word can be used at all.

The new sculpture seems a little wayward to me. It seems too close to the building. The back appeals to me more than the front where a large, vagina-like appendage spills forth above the entrance to the cave. It is somewhat more magical at night. I think I will like this sculpture over time but at the moment I'm feeling a little squimish about it.

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This sculpture, which is arguably Houston's most controversial and artistically important outdoor expression, was dedicated to MLK and its defacement was a crude political act and not an ordinary 'tagging' if that word can be used at all.

i just need to say that dedicating that sculpture to MLK was a joke! Could we commision a sculpture specifically for him & not just rename an old one. Seems kinda disrespectful 2 me.

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I dont' think that Broken Obelisk was was rededicated to MLK. It was made specifically as a memorial to him - far from disrespectful.

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I dont' think that Broken Obelisk was was rededicated to MLK. It was made specifically as a memorial to him - far from disrespectful.

That had always been my impression, too.

Hair splitting seems to be in order. While Broken Obelisk was not constructed as a memorial to Dr. King, it had not been dedicated in any way until after Dr. King's assassination; "rededicated" doesn't apply.

In my opinion it's a fitting tribute. That Barnett Newman probably didn't have Dr. King in mind at the project's conception doesn't negate its appropriateness.

From the MOMA Learning website:

The idea for Broken Obelisk (an obelisk is a tall, four-sided structure that comes to a pyramidlike point) came to Newman in 1963, but he was unable to create the work until he was introduced to a steel manufacturer in 1967. In 1968 Newman dedicated Broken Obelisk to the civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr., who was assassinated that same year

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I went to this today and did not expect what I saw at all. But I understand it I think, so it was cool.

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Went back this past weekend. Still cool, but I don't agree.

It's existentialistic. I don't believe in that. But it's still a nice place to go to if you like the peace and quiet. Plus, I like to giggle at the perplexed people who walk in and out in two minutes. I'll revisit in the future.

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I used to always comment on "old" topics - I suppose this is installed (I was in the neighborhood yesterday and today and had no idea a new sculpture had been installed)? I have to wonder though if the artist was really looking at the surrounding neighborhood when they designed the artwork? It seems like it could easilly be out of place - but I will reserve judgement until I see it later this week. Nice to see that atleast the New York Times keeps up with our arts "scene".

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interestingly the broken obleisk sculpture was first exhibited in New York city in front of the Seagrams building before the Menils brought it to HOuston.

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interestingly the broken obleisk sculpture was first exhibited in New York city in front of the Seagrams building before the Menils brought it to HOuston.

But before it came to Houston, it was at the Corcoran Gallery in Washington DC too.

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interestingly the broken obleisk sculpture was first exhibited in New York city in front of the Seagrams building before the Menils brought it to HOuston.

As I recall it was offered to Houston's City Hall, but City Hall had a problem with it being dedicated to Martin Luther King so it ended up at Rothko.

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Not sure if this belongs here. Mods can move if you want. Saw this in today's WSJ. Renovations on the Rothko Chapel. 

 

Quote

Houston’s Rothko Chapel, the final masterpiece of one of 20th-century America’s most recognized artists, hasn’t led an easy existence. For a place meant to help visitors transcend their earthly travails, it has faced many. Mark Rothko died by suicide a year before the chapel opened in 1971, leaving his family and supporters to decide how best to foster his legacy in the face of the building’s subsidence, the city’s harsh sunlight, and humidity’s toll on his works.

In the latest and most ambitious effort to finally get it right, the ecumenical chapel is closing on Monday for renovation and expansion ahead of its 50th anniversary in 2021. The octagonal building, commissioned in the mid-1960s by Houston’s de Menil family, was designed as part of a total work with Rothko’s 14 enormous panels, in black and dark plum, to invoke a spirit of transcendence. That was always a delicate enterprise, and the aim of the current $30 million project is to do it better....

 

Full article with some cool pictures...

https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-push-to-preserve-a-rothko-masterpiece-11551283796

 

 

 

 

 

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