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Contemp

Woodall Rogers as it currently exists, impedes pedestrian-life style between downtown and uptown Dallas

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Would you be able to expound on the history of this topic? When Woodall Rogers was built in the 70's it fragmented and eventually dissolved some small communities, such as Little Mexico, as it was known then.

But nowadays Woodall Rogers is seen as a barrior between downtown and uptown living, correct?

And is the idea behind covering Woodall Rogers with parks and greenspace almost a way of covering up this barrier? But the impediment will still remain....

Edited by Contemp
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welcome to the forum contemp. :)

i believe your thread belongs in another forum. there is a dallas/ft.worth forum and then there is a haif sister site for dallas.

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Would you be able to expound on the history of this topic? When Woodall Rogers was built in the 70's it fragmented and eventually dissolved some small communities, such as Little Mexico, as it was known then.

But nowadays Woodall Rogers is seen as a barrior between downtown and uptown living, correct?

And is the idea behind covering Woodall Rogers with parks and greenspace almost a way of covering up this barrier? But the impediment will still remain....

Unfortunately yes, Woodall Rodgers didn't really accomplish what it set out to do, act as a bypass to the mixmaster (the I-35 & I-30 interchange). Along with I-345, it completely choked off DT from Uptown and Deep Ellum. All the deck park is going to do is act like lipstick on a pig. The only important thing the deck park needs to accomplish is provide easy access and priority pedestrian crossings on the service roads parallel to the park. Sure the glass and grass that make up the park are fine and dandy, but if the deck park is to truly act as a link from the arts district and the rest of DT to Uptown and LoMac, it had better make sure pedestrians have priority crossing the streets.

lightsystem.jpg

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Ground breaking takes place for Woodall Rodgers deck park in Dallas

01:42 PM CDT on Monday, September 14, 2009

By CHRIS DELL / The Dallas Morning News

http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/dn/latestnews/stories/091509dnmetpark.17bdaad49.html

The 5.2-acre Woodall Rodgers deck park that some doubted would ever get built took one step closer to reality this morning as officials gathered for a groundbreaking.

The Woodall Rodgers Park Foundation held a celebration in Dallas, marking the end of the five-year planning phase of the urban park that will span across the freeway. The park will stretch three blocks between Pearl and St. Paul streets, linking the Uptown and downtown areas.

"Many people felt this couldn't be done – it's too complicated, too expensive and too much of a challenge for the city of Dallas. Today, we proved them wrong," said Jody Grant, park foundation chairman, during the celebration at the Parkside Condos.

...

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I don't understand why they left the street in the middle of the park, Is it Field st? I forget. But with Pearl being a 2 way street literally feet away you would thing that it would be able to sufficiently hold the traffic, especially since you have to go to pearl anyway to get on the highway.

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I don't understand why they left the street in the middle of the park, Is it Field st? I forget. But with Pearl being a 2 way street literally feet away you would thing that it would be able to sufficiently hold the traffic, especially since you have to go to pearl anyway to get on the highway.

That's Olive Street (Harwood Street was the only one closed through the park). Construction is currently extending the MATA streetcar from Uptown to the DART St Paul Station. The current route will be extended south on St Paul Street (at the far end of the park) and back north on Olive Street. There will be a transit plaza at the park, and the street can be closed during festivals/events. The service roads have been narrowed, on-street parking added and traffic signals un-synced to slow crossing traffic in the area.

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Looks bigger than Discovery Green.

Let's hope they don't let weeds start growing all out of control like Disco Green has.

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It may get to feeling smaller once the blocks along the north side fill in with new development, but yes, for now it looks much bigger than its footprint requires.

There may even be a Katy Trail connection in the works; I don't remember.

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i take it this is dallas' version of discovery green? looks nice.

Its Dallas's version of a park over a freeway. This has been in the making for a number of years stemming from about the time they built Woodall's in the 80's. It is meant to bridge uptown with downtown, and is one of the parks Dallas has included in their parks plan for downtown. Nothing to do with Houston's Discovery Green. Discovery Green has more interactive learning expericences. Klyde has a children's park/area with a reading area, but the rest of it is geared to be an ammenity for downtown residents / workers.

Edited by slfunk

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In other words, yes, it's Dallas's attempt at a version of Discovery Green. ;-)

Not a knock to either park. They are not similar to one another unless you are talking about green plants and an open lawn. Different programs, size, etc. Woodall's is simply a park (lawn, resturant pavilion, concert stage) with a small children's play area. Discovery Green is an interactive park with a much larger scope that gears towards pieces of art / sculpture that kids and adults can interact with. Similar to pieces that you would find at a Natural History Museum or Science place. Thats not the design or intention of Warren Klyde Park.

Edited by slfunk

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In the first article by the D Magazine 'How the park was built' they cite similar size parks (Millenium and Bryant) for examples of ammenities. IMO, Millenium is a stretch. In the article 'Super Models for Klyde Park' they list the parks you listed as to what a park can do for a city both financially, cosmetically, and socially. In that aspect, then yes this is Dallas's "version" of Discovery Green, but you would need to add Main Street and Belo Gardens to that list then.... But the parks are different in design and ammenities and that is my point. Klyde Park is an open green space with a stage, cafe, children's area, putting green, with a perimeter walkway lined with small gardens, some water fountain features and geared to leisure / recreation. Discovery Green has all that (maybe not the putting green) and more... full service restaurant, gardens, grasslands, wetlands, large open field, interactive sculptures, lake house, Kinder lake, kayaking...etc. Discovery Green is huge, Klyde is small in comparison. If you were to make comparisons, Discovery Green is designed more in line with Central Park's ammenities, and Klyde is designed more in line with Bryant's ammenities. Dallas does already have a park that is more like Discovery Green and thats White Rock Lake minus the sculptures, gardens, and full service restaurant.

Edited by slfunk

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In the first article by the D Magazine 'How the park was built' they cite similar size parks (Millenium and Bryant) for examples of ammenities. IMO, Millenium is a stretch. In the article 'Super Models for Klyde Park' they list the parks you listed as to what a park can do for a city both financially, cosmetically, and socially. In that aspect, then yes this is Dallas's "version" of Discovery Green, but you would need to add Main Street and Belo Gardens to that list then.... But the parks are different in design and ammenities and that is my point. Klyde Park is an open green space with a stage, cafe, children's area, putting green, with a perimeter walkway lined with small gardens, some water fountain features and geared to leisure / recreation. Discovery Green has all that (maybe not the putting green) and more... full service restaurant, gardens, grasslands, wetlands, large open field, interactive sculptures, lake house, Kinder lake, kayaking...etc. Discovery Green is huge, Klyde is small in comparison. If you were to make comparisons, Discovery Green is designed more in line with Central Park's ammenities, and Klyde is designed more in line with Bryant's ammenities. Dallas does already have a park that is more like Discovery Green and thats White Rock Lake minus the sculptures, gardens, and full service restaurant.

To summarize, Dallas's Klyde Park is a smaller version of Houston's Discovery Green. Hopefully (for Dallas) it will be at least 1/2 as successful.

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Just like Houston, Dallas is not immune from criticism. Why should it be? Lots of things in Dallas are sub-par and mediocre. There is nothing childish about pointing them out. Some people seem to have no problem pointing them out in Houston.

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I don't understand the constant putting down of Dallas. It's childish.

 

Speaking of being defensive...   where was there any putting down of Dallas in this thread?

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Why does it have to be compared to discovery green?

Isn't that really a compliment? Discovery Green has been a huge success.

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Isn't that really a compliment? Discovery Green has been a huge success.

 

It is, but it seems nothing about the planning of the park had Discovery Green in mind. Either this could be Dallas denying that and wanting to stand on its own, or it could be the truth and Houston just trying to take credit for something Dallas is doing well. Either just shows the strange relationship the two cities' residents have towards each other.

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It is, but it seems nothing about the planning of the park had Discovery Green in mind. Either this could be Dallas denying that and wanting to stand on its own, or it could be the truth and Houston just trying to take credit for something Dallas is doing well. Either just shows the strange relationship the two cities' residents have towards each other.

 

..?

 

Don't you compare our transit system to other cities all the time? What's wrong with comparisons?

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It is, but it seems nothing about the planning of the park had Discovery Green in mind. Either this could be Dallas denying that and wanting to stand on its own, or it could be the truth and Houston just trying to take credit for something Dallas is doing well. Either just shows the strange relationship the two cities' residents have towards each other.

I honestly think that you're reading more into this than is actually there. It's just a natural human reaction to compare something that you see to something that you know. They compare it to Bryant Park in their literature. Discovery Green got compared to Bryant Park as well when it got built.

I don't know much about the development, but looking at the pictures, there is definitely a look and feel similarity between the two and there should be.

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It is, but it seems nothing about the planning of the park had Discovery Green in mind. Either this could be Dallas denying that and wanting to stand on its own, or it could be the truth and Houston just trying to take credit for something Dallas is doing well. Either just shows the strange relationship the two cities' residents have towards each other.

 

What's even more interesting is the efforts on the part of some to deny the obvious similarities.

 

Also interesting to note that they chose a Houston landscape architect to design the deck park.  I'm sure no one gave Discovery Green a thought during the whole process.  ;-)

Edited by Houston19514

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Discovery Green is a good park, and I hope Dallas and other cities do borrow ideas from it.

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Houston and Dallas will be compared to each other until the end of time. Sometimes Houston will win sometimes Dallas will win. Most of the time it will be a draw. Anytime you have 2 things that are similar and in relatively close proximity to one another they are going to be compared. It's human nature.

 

If someone wants to post photos and renderings of something going up in Dallas (or anywhere else) at a website called HOUSTON architecture information forum, they better be prepared to hear a little criticism because just like the stuff that gets built in Houston, nothing is flawless or perfect in Dallas either. If you come here looking for only positive feedback for everything they do in Dallas, you are going to be extremely frustrated.

 

I will make sure of it.

Edited by Mister X

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Again, what's wrong with comparisons between cities? Nothing.

Compare this to LA/SF comparisons. This is just mild conversation. Those two cities really hate each other.

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Please note this portion of the Terms of Service you agreed to when you signed up for HAIF:

 

 

Respectful discussions only. My-city-is-better-than-your-city flame wars are not permitted on HAIF. "He started it" is not a valid excuse. Both parties in a flame war may have their accounts suspended or terminated. Just walk away. Flames will be deleted without notice.

 

Do not let this thread devolve into a Houston v. Dallas flamewar.  And keep your comments on the topic at hand.  Do not post about each other.

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Eventually, Klyde Williams Park will open its restaurant and the similarities between it and Discovery Green will be even greater.

Edited by Houston19514

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Actually, it's a sign of honesty.

 

As a completely unbiased, impartial observer, just driving by and minding my own business, I have noticed that the homeless population absolutely adore Klyde Warren Park even more than Main Street Garden.

Edited by Mister X

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Since people chose to ignore the warning above, this thread is closed.

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