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414 Mignon


texasdago

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I actually really like this house, or should I say I could like it. I like mods that are rectilinear like this. I love all of the rear facing glass. However the garage addition is just bad, along with the red painted brick in the kitchen/ living. The master bath must be 80's. Reminds me of the movie "Ruthless People" sans bright colors and fake Warhols. Hopefully someone will see its potential, though that is a lot of work for $350.

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Texasdago, are you saying the McMansion would go behind this one?

Seems to me this house suffers from the same pricing issue as 330 Electra, but at least that one has a huge lot. Is this the going price for an MCM sold off as a teardown lot in Memorial Bend? Although 8400 lot is not that large for a McMansion. I don't know how I would justify purchasing this one at anything near that price and spending a lot of time and money, then having to wait a few years for the equity to catch up. Maybe $250,000 but not $350,000.

What do you guys think its worth?

After looking at HCAD and seeing the interior photos, looks like it landed in the lap of some not so successful but lucky relative that thinks they are going to cash in on it.

Edited by retromodernjeff
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This one backs up to Faust rather than Gretel so the McMansion would not be near it. I just posted a description on archibend.blogspot.com. Anyway, I think this house has been a rental for a long time. It may be worth having Robert Searcy dig a little deeper on their willingness to move on price. I'm pretty sure its a big jump in price since the last time it was listed.

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I saw the house getting worked on a few months ago...I guess that explains the price jump. I can see why I was a bit worried about their "upgrading" when I saw the listing pictures of the "false front" garage door opening into a courtyard, Yikes!

hr1787939-6.jpg

Makes me wish folks would just ask for design advice before creating something like this.

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Btw, I've been wondering about something and no one has been able to answer yet...

How are the builders able to build McMansions in these neighborhoods? Don't the deed restrictions have set back rules and other limitations on where the footprint of the house can be on the lot?

If not, I'm wondering why many/most neighborhoods subject to this wouldn't get together and change their deed restrictions.

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roym...

good question on the deed restrictions... perhaps I can shed some light...

I live in Timbergrove Manor and am actually the chairperson of our Architectural Review Committee. The deed restrictions we have are very weak in regards to limiting construction. We have a nebulous term stating that a house must be "in harmony and conformity with the existing structures", but that is incredibly difficult to both define and enforce considering how much architecture has changed since the 50s.

That being said, most of our lots here are 7,400-10,000 sq ft. In section 5 TS Allison claimed several houses so new construction is starting to occur. Thus, McMansions are built. Front setbacks are normally 25 ft and rear here are also 25 ft... for an average lot of 65x125 (8,125 sqft) that allows a buildable area front to back of 75 feet and side to side of 55 feet. Buildable ground floor square footage would be 4125 sq ft. It doesn't take much imagination to see how easy it would be to drop a 2-story 4,500+ sq ft house in this space and still have a reasonable amount of yard left over.

As for changing DRs, we're trying to do that here. It is a difficult process by which you have to get the majority of the neighborhood to agree on them. There are always people with different agendas and different view points. Once you think you have a document that is acceptable to the community you then have to go out and get approval signatures from at least 50+% of the homeowners. Compounding this is that you also have to get a notary to be there to confirm the signatures. Once that is done then you can file them with the County at which point I have no clue how long it takes to have them officially in place.

It is tough to do, so it takes a really motivated base of homeowners to put forth the effort. We are nearly one year in to our project here and are almost ready to get signatures. A previous effort in this neighborhood lasted 3 years and failed to accomplish anything.

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roym...

good question on the deed restrictions... perhaps I can shed some light...

I live in Timbergrove Manor and am actually the chairperson of our Architectural Review Committee. The deed restrictions we have are very weak in regards to limiting construction. We have a nebulous term stating that a house must be "in harmony and conformity with the existing structures", but that is incredibly difficult to both define and enforce considering how much architecture has changed since the 50s.

That being said, most of our lots here are 7,400-10,000 sq ft. In section 5 TS Allison claimed several houses so new construction is starting to occur. Thus, McMansions are built. Front setbacks are normally 25 ft and rear here are also 25 ft... for an average lot of 65x125 (8,125 sqft) that allows a buildable area front to back of 75 feet and side to side of 55 feet. Buildable ground floor square footage would be 4125 sq ft. It doesn't take much imagination to see how easy it would be to drop a 2-story 4,500+ sq ft house in this space and still have a reasonable amount of yard left over.

As for changing DRs, we're trying to do that here. It is a difficult process by which you have to get the majority of the neighborhood to agree on them. There are always people with different agendas and different view points. Once you think you have a document that is acceptable to the community you then have to go out and get approval signatures from at least 50+% of the homeowners. Compounding this is that you also have to get a notary to be there to confirm the signatures. Once that is done then you can file them with the County at which point I have no clue how long it takes to have them officially in place.

It is tough to do, so it takes a really motivated base of homeowners to put forth the effort. We are nearly one year in to our project here and are almost ready to get signatures. A previous effort in this neighborhood lasted 3 years and failed to accomplish anything.

Thanks for the reply. I was curious because I live in a neighborhood where the lots are mostly 1 acre in size. You have to build a REALLY big house there to make an impact and most would probably welcome homes like that in our neighborhood (Cypress Tx by the way). The building line is 50ft from the front, and 15ft on the sides. I can't remember what the back line is.

We have to have 3/4 homeowner's approval to change our deed restrictions - but they are generally so lax anyways that it doesn't much matter... but yes I know what you mean about the work involved in changing them. We've been in one of those battles before. This matter just seems higher on the importance scale than many other issues that come up.

I can't even remember what the DR were in theThe previous neighborhood I lived in - Parkglen in sw Houston. But those are really cheap tract homes from the early 70's. And I can't see anyone in the future deciding that these homes have character and historical value, hard as I try. No offense to current Parkglen home owners intended. :P

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This property is in dire condition -- despite the "upgrades". Brick facade suggests a stout structure but once one peers around the side a better picture emerges: Wood frame and cladding. Based on the first image there appears to be deflection in the roof structure as is evident by the warped fascia board -- this should cause some concern. Peering in the windows yesterday revealed new carpet throughout (perhaps there's terrazzo beneath), poor detail/repair at arched windows and a curious floor plan -- likely the result of "improvements" over the years. This property suggest a rental history and all that comes with it. As for the price, it may be in-line with the adjacent comps but as a candidate for back dating/correcting it would require d-e-e-p pockets.

Is it worth it?

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That...thing in the middle of the room - is that supposed to be a kitchen? And what's up with those cabinets randomly stuck on the wall? The place has potential but as it sits, it's ugly and weird. And as already been remarked, $350k seems excessive. To restore this place would have to be a labor of love.

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It looks to me like there WAS a wall dividing the living room (or whatever that skinny space is) from the kitchen and it was removed to open the space up. It looks really awkward the way it's done. Why else would that beam and those posts be exposed like that?

Perhaps the counter or some parts of the kitchen were faced a different direction after the wall was removed?

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"Brick facade suggests a stout structure but once one peers around the side a better picture emerges: Wood frame and cladding... As for the price, it may be in-line with the adjacent comps but as a candidate for back dating/correcting it would require d-e-e-p pockets."

My mistake on my previous post: I inadvertantly referred to wood frame and cladding thinking this was the 330 Electra Drive listing -- oddly, aside from the mis-identification of building construction type the remainder of my statement is valid for either property.

Both of these would require a major commitment to restoration.

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414 MIGNON

Houston, Texas

That...thing in the middle of the room - is that supposed to be a kitchen? The place has potential but as it sits, it's ugly and weird.

The sales agent's photographs of this house are of such poor quality they do nothing to help his cause. The Memorial Bend website has some more picturesque views:

414mig.jpg

The front looks beautiful in this photo. The palms and other trees are of great value.

414mig3.jpg

The kitchen looks good (except for the dishwasher location) and appropriate for this house. It looks like the main entry comes into the kitchen counter/bar. I still can not figure out the floor plan but I can tell the place has some features that make it more outstanding than many mods. The windows that extend up to the roof/ceiling plane are an expensive detail. The load has to be carried in the thin roof area as there is no beam over the wide sliding door.

The pool, even though old pools add little or no monetary value, adds a great deal of excitement and swank appeal. A vintage pool and fittings are difficult to impossible to duplicate and new pools often look out of place in these mid century contemporary houses. While swimming pools are fairly common today, having a pool in the 50s and 60s was truly glamorous.

To prevent confusion of these houses and to make searches easier, please list the street address in the topic title line of future house discussions.

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"To prevent confusion of these houses and to make searches easier, please list the street address in the topic title line of future house discussions."

Good points. The new images do indeed paint an enhanced picture... it would be worthwhile to walk this property. Your suggestion regarding address use is valid and I will utilize such in future postings. Thanks!

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Thanks for posting the additional pictures, SpaceAge; the kitchen layout makes a lot more sense now, and the view from the street is enlightening. Still, the idea of having the kitchen so open to the entrance seems problematic for all but the most meticulous housekeepers. And wouldn't odors and grease easily migrate into the living room?

A random comment: it's a shame that so many Memorial Bend houses have had those sickening fake incongruous Victorian doors installed. danax and I took a tour of the neighborhood, and it seems at least half of the houses have been defiled with them. Would the originals have had a simple large pane, or would they have been a solid panel of wood or metal?

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it's a shame that so many Memorial Bend houses have had those sickening fake incongruous Victorian doors installed

Boy if that isn't the truth. We still have to remove our leaded glass blech door. We're going to replace it with a full light door with reed glass. It will be a lot more in line with an MCM house than what we have now.

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Thanks for posting the additional pictures, SpaceAge; the kitchen layout makes a lot more sense now, and the view from the street is enlightening. Still, the idea of having the kitchen so open to the entrance seems problematic for all but the most meticulous housekeepers. And wouldn't odors and grease easily migrate into the living room?

A random comment: it's a shame that so many Memorial Bend houses have had those sickening fake incongruous Victorian doors installed. danax and I took a tour of the neighborhood, and it seems at least half of the houses have been defiled with them. Would the originals have had a simple large pane, or would they have been a solid panel of wood or metal?

Those doors are the worst. You see it so often with MCM houses. At least it is easy to correct.

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A random comment: it's a shame that so many Memorial Bend houses have had those sickening fake incongruous Victorian doors installed. danax and I took a tour of the neighborhood, and it seems at least half of the houses have been defiled with them. Would the originals have had a simple large pane, or would they have been a solid panel of wood or metal?

Appropriate door selection: that sounds like a meaningful topic for a Houston Mod campaign. My goal would be to ban the sale, manufacture, importation, or use of any metal door with oval glass panels in Harris County.

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Appropriate door selection: that sounds like a meaningful topic for a Houston Mod campaign. My goal would be to ban the sale, manufacture, importation, or use of any metal door with oval glass panels in Harris County.

I couldn't agree more. We should divert them all to Florida.

flipper

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  • 2 weeks later...

I like some of the colors used inside the house. I love the pungent red on the walls in the inside.

Since the house is zoned to Spring Branch ISD's Memorial schools (Rummel Creek ES, Memorial MS, Memorial HS), the house may easily attract a family desiring a mod :)

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"Since the house is zoned to Spring Branch ISD's Memorial schools (Rummel Creek ES, Memorial MS, Memorial HS), the house may easily attract a family desiring a mod."

Having children myself, I have come to find that the school district as well as the actual schools therein can have a huge impact on buyers with children... and the difference between a good school and a terrific school may literally be divided by a street.

But I state the obvious.

As for the potential remediation/renovation costs for this property: I would estimate at least 75 to 80K -- that is of course, assuming the work is done correctly (i.e. not the "band-aid" approach).

This too should be obvious.

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Btw, I've been wondering about something and no one has been able to answer yet...

How are the builders able to build McMansions in these neighborhoods? Don't the deed restrictions have set back rules and other limitations on where the footprint of the house can be on the lot?

If not, I'm wondering why many/most neighborhoods subject to this wouldn't get together and change their deed restrictions.

A McMansion can easily be built in most neighborhoods with deed restrictions. Back when many neighborhoods were developed, homes were built smaller than the "footprint" allowed. now the mcmansions are just using the entire "footprint"

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"A McMansion can easily be built in most neighborhoods with deed restrictions. Back when many neighborhoods were developed, homes were built smaller than the "footprint" allowed. now the mcmansions are just using the entire 'footprint'."

Before long the entire lot may be utilized as the building footprint... won't that be something?

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Before long the entire lot may be utilized as the building footprint... won't that be something?

Well not the entire lot, but they sure will maximize the footprint to the fullest extent. Easements and setbacks should be protected.

Edited by musicman
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"I wish I had the kind of money to fix it up--it's got great potential."

It does appear to have potential... though I would conservatively estimate a 50 to 70K renovation expenditure -- assuming its done correctly and one wishes to return it to its former integrity. This one may have "flipper" written all over it given the foreclosure issue.

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