Jump to content

University of Houston Surrounding Neighborhoods


Sevzer

Recommended Posts

Some of the subdivisions in the U.H. area have lots as big or bigger than River Oaks. There are also several slum areas around those subdivisions.

The subdivisions include:

* Riverside Terrace

* Oak Manor/University Woods

* University Oaks

* Washington Terrace

School-wise, the Houston ISD schools in the U.H. area are not considered to be that good. To see which houses are zoned to which schools, use http://dept.houstonisd.org/ab/abcx_tool/search.asp

If you plan to have kids, I would send them to the HISD schools in the West University/Uptown/River Oaks/Bellaire/Meyerland area or send the kids to private schools.

Edited by VicMan
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, I don't have plans to move there anytime soon, I just found a lot that I liked that I thought I could hold on too in case I want to build a home there in the next 5-8 years. I know that whole area is going to be redeveloped in the future and I am hoping that maybe by then I might really decide to build another home in that location. I am just trying to find out if anyone really thinks that area is hot? :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are many nice homes in the vicinity however they may be next to some bad areas. If you like the area and find it attractive buy it. If you don't, then maybe others won't either. As usual, this is subjective.

I know that there is an apartment complex near southmore and scott that we used to skate by and you ALWAYS smelled pot. And there is a convenience store that the HPD closed down (macgregor/scott) until the owner would hire security because too many drug transactions were happening. But yet nearby there are some great homes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, I don't have plans to move there anytime soon, I just found a lot that I liked that I thought I could hold on too in case I want to build a home there in the next 5-8 years. I know that whole area is going to be redeveloped in the future and I am hoping that maybe by then I might really decide to build another home in that location. I am just trying to find out if anyone really thinks that area is hot? :D

Fortunately areas like University Oaks are quiet as far as developers coming in. There are a couple of McMansions that have tried to squeeze in between some cottage style bugalows but that is bout it. I think the area being a secret is best in my opinion. My grandmother just recently moved out of the neighborhood to Austin for retirement.

Edited by WesternGulf
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, I don't have plans to move there anytime soon, I just found a lot that I liked that I thought I could hold on too in case I want to build a home there in the next 5-8 years. I know that whole area is going to be redeveloped in the future and I am hoping that maybe by then I might really decide to build another home in that location. I am just trying to find out if anyone really thinks that area is hot? :D

I like your strategy and wish I had some cash to try exactly what you mention. Here's a link to information about the marquee part of Riverside Terrace, mostly the homes along Macgregor near Scott. I don't know the area well, but you can search around and see if you find anything interesting. Take a look at this property -- nice example of 1950's construction.

For land speculation, a tried and true strategy is to a) find a nice area, B) buy lots nearby, and c) wait. Or, if you're a developer, c) build some spec houses on the cheaper land and try to convince people that the area is just as nice as the "nice area".

You see it happening on the fringes of West University Place and The Heights. Here, I would worry about such a strategy, because I'm not sure there's the critical mass of developers willing to bet that their investment will pay off. Until then, I'd guess that gentrification will be a more organic process. At least the land is cheap everywhere--for $100K you can easily buy a 10K sqft lot.

Good luck!

Edited by mpbro
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's hard to time potential appreciation and "black" areas can be slower to gentrify, unless they are slashed and burned like 4th Ward, but waiting until the yuppies start to move in would mean a much higher price of course.

Gambling on the Southeast Metrorail line? The Red Line still hasn't panned out for speculators, it would seem, so a spiffed up bus through the hood would not be such a big deal.

Make sure there aren't too many apartments nearby too. Garnet Coleman might own them and they'll never improve then.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's another Riverside Terrace subdivision; this one is closer to 288. Sales data show a favorable trend. Land values still under $10/sqft (HCAD). Average homes seem to be selling for $200K--you're hardly in the ghetto! I'm surprised, there are some nice houses over there (one, two).
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am a real estate buyer's agent and only two buyers in nine years have mentioned that area to me. So I would have to say that appreciation and/or resale might be difficult. Also, you want to stay away from lots of apartments, as mentioned by danax.

Edited by jlt1988
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a friend who lives with her boyfriend in a really bad apartment complex near TSU. I wish they would live in a nicer complex reasonably close to TSU.

Is it a good idea to report possible safety violations of the complex to the city? It didn't feel right to me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Would someone like to give me their thoughts/advice on purchasing property around UH near Scott? :unsure:

If you can afford to buy a couple of small homes, IMO take the risk. I bought two small "shacks" in that area and rent them out. I barely break even but have some equity with it. I beleive the pay off will be with' in a decade as the value of the property goes up and then I'll find the right time to sell it to a developer .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you can afford to buy a couple of small homes, IMO take the risk. I bought two small "shacks" in that area and rent them out. I barely break even but have some equity with it. I beleive the pay off will be with' in a decade as the value of the property goes up and then I'll find the right time to sell it to a developer .

Slumlording is actually a very good strategy. And there is potentially significant upside around UH which will result from future expansion plans. If your investment time horizon is at least 10 years, you'll definitely see significant appreciation in the area. If you can hold on for 20 years, all the better.

I'm not sure that I'd buy lots, though, since shotgun shacks are often highly depreciated from the value of the property but still produce income in the interim.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My European History teacher told me that many Riverside Terrace residents are elitist and do not want anything to do with their poor neighbors.

The residents, according to my teacher, do not send their kids to the local public schools.

Not trying to defend what I don't know about the residents, but if I could afford to live in Riverside Terrace, I doubt my children would be going to HISD either.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • The title was changed to University of Houston Surrounding Neighborhoods

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...