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Hildebrandt Intermediate School


Chris

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This weekend I was at Hildebrandt Intermediate School for a football game and it was not a pretty site. For those of you who dont know about this school, It is in Klein ISD. Hildebrandt Intermediate School, having been dedicated in December 1973, is the oldest and most northern intermediate school in the Klein Independent School District. It is also the most overcrowded school in Klein ISD. Currently Intermediate School #8 is being built to help relieve. Hildebrandt serves over 1500+ students. There are 14 T-Buildings outside around the back and sides of the school. It is just crazy. I have nerver seen so many T-Buildings at one school in my life. I went to the rest room inside the building, and through the outside of the building are windows, and just looking through, this school is very outdated and old. There needs to be a renovation project before its to late. Come on the building is 33 going on 34 years old. It is a very good school though, lets be forereal Its in Klein ISD which is in the top 17 percent of school districts in the USA. :(

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Where is Hildebrandt? Off Kuykendahl?

What's with the bolded out posts?

[b]Hildebrandt is loctaed at 22800 Hildebrandt Road next to Klein Oak HS and Northampton Elem School. Going north on Kuykendahl past Wal Mart and Kroger, you will pass Spring Stuebner Rd. Hildebrandt Rd is the next street. You will make a right on the road, and you will run right into it. It's in the middle of nowhere like were a bunch of cows and open land is.

I just like to use bold, it stands out better.

Edited by Chris
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Our schools could use the same lesson which responsible parents teach their children: If you don't take care of the things you already have, you will not be allowed to get anything new.

Whether a bright, shiny new toy or a new building with all the bells and whistles, it's a waste to let what you have fall into disrepair. Shame on the parents and the citizens who willingly pay for new toys and buildings when whiny children and school boards demand new things without taking proper care of what they already have.

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Just to set the record straight: Hildebrandt is not in disrepair. Granted, it's not Klein Collins or College Park High School in the Woodlands, but it's perfectly fine the way it is.

There really is no need to radically change or upgrade anything about the building itself. The most important part of any school is really not the building, it's the teachers. Hildebrandt has really good teachers and administrators, and the kids seem to be pretty happy there, despite the fact that "It's in the middle of nowhere like were a bunch of cows and open land is." :P

Edited by pineda
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Well, the "open field and cow pastures" description is misleading. The school serves the Northhampton neighborhood, which is very established and looks like a neighborhood you'd see inside Loop 610. This neighborhood has excellent demographics, so it would not surprise me that there are high quality teachers and administrators at Hildebrandt.

Does anyone know who developed the Northhampton subdivision?

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The Story of Northampton by Northampton resident author, Jack Hickey

Then in the 1960s, in what has been described as 'a remarkably bold move' by one historian, a well-known Houston developer looked beyond the dense underbrush, majestic pine and oak trees and forest that was home for deer and other wildlife.

That developer was Glenn McMillan, who earlier helped rescue the affluent Memorial section of inner Houston from post World War II tract homes and turned it into one of today's most prestigious residential areas. Memorial's pine and oak forests were similar to the forest he found stretching from Root Road to Willow Creek and beyond in Northwest Harris County. One of the major and most important differences however was that while Memorial lay only a short distance west of downtown Houston, the area that became Northampton was 30 miles northwest of the frantic pace set by the city's traffic, noise, pollution and congestion.

This era was prior to the explosive growth of the FM 1960 corridor, before the two-lane blacktop was renamed '1960' rather than Jackrabbit Road, before the completion of Bush Intercontinental Airport, before mixed drinks were legal in restaurants and bars. It was before subdivisions such as Westador, Oak Creek Village, Huntwick, Cypresswood and others were more than an idea.

Even those soon-to-be-built developments were far removed from the serene Northampton area. After the subdivision was laid out on paper, its development began in 1968 with the backbone of Northampton's streets being the main thoroughfare, Northcrest Drive. Northcrest anchored the only entrance off Root Road and originally extended to a dead end at Darby Way, the fourth street that branched off Northcrest at right angles. The other three streets of Section One were Allentown, Bayonne and Craigway. A second north-south street paralleling Northcrest was carved out, providing youngsters an uncongested walking and bicycle path to the soon-to-be-completed elementary school (Northampton Elementary). This street was Pine Knot.

Like mercury extending upward in a thermometer as it heats up, Northcrest extended northward as sales in Northampton heated up. As additional sections opened, Northcrest reached almost to Willow Creek by the early 1980s. It then extended across Willow Creek and presently dead ends at its junction with Rayford Road. On the drawing board however there are plans to extend it past Rayford Road as future developments become reality. (Note from pineda: Northcrest extends northward now, into an adjoining but seperate development called Auburn Lakes. Auburn Lakes is to the south of the Woodlands new development of Creekside Park. Both of these developments are on the south side of Spring Creek, while Indian Springs is to the north of Spring Creek.)

But back to the beginning. The first Northampton home stands at the corner of Allentown and Northcrest Drive. A picturesque white two-story house with colonial-type columns, it was the original Model Home. Section One's opening attracted a limited number of prestige homebuilders whose work measured up to the high standards demanded for Northampton. (Note from pineda: This house completely burned to the ground years ago and was later completely rebuilt as it had been in the beginning. During this process, which took months to complete, the affected family stayed with various neighbors in Northampton to ensure that the children had very little disruption in their schools and community activities.)

Originally advertised as a horse lover's paradise, Northampton featured riding paths behind these early homes. Two equestrian stables on each side of Northampton on Root Road provided horse owners needed services for their steeds. The tall trees and picturesque Willow Creek provided a beautiful setting for riders. Early planners considered the Willow Creek area suitable for larger home sites on which horse owners might stable their mounts. (Note from pineda: These riding paths are now walking/jogging paths along Root Road in West Park.)

This and other ideas for the area north of today's street of Northway were scuttled when the U. S. Corps of Engineers surveyed the flood plain area and included this section of land. Following intense discussion with Northampton representatives, the Corps agreed to revise and lower the flood plain level. This removed much of the area from the flood plain and later improvements in drainage helped assure the area was suitable for development.

Demand for these homes in the 1970s was fueled by Houston's expanding domination of the petroleum and petrochemical industries, the growth of the aerospace facility at NASA and the contractors who served NASA and the soon-to-be-completed Bush Intercontinental Airport. All of these triggered an influx of highly trained, highly paid employees. Many of them sought the quiet and peaceful atmosphere promised by Northampton as an escape from the hurried pace of their profession.

As word spread through real estate circles in 1968 and 1969, Northampton began to fill with stately homes. Today more than 260 houses have been built in Section One.

Section Two followed shortly, and new residents began moving into their homes on Elmgrove and Fawnwood Streets by 1970. Northcrest Drive was extended to serve the second section. During the next decade Northampton continued its growth, proving the original concept to be a successful one. This new growth called for new streets, including Glenhill, Hickorycrest, Inway, Jadecrest, Knollview, Larkmount, Meadowtrace and ending at Northway. Lateral streets were Forestcrest and ambling Creekview whose horseshoe-shaped contour spun off Morningcrest, Norchester Way, Hampton Way, Willowcrest Court and Courseview Court.

Next came a secluded section whose homes were enclosed inside an entrance gates on Northcrest and were built around circular Kingcrest Lane. Cul-de-sac streets were Squire Court and Stratmore Court. (Note from pineda: This is no longer a gated area.)

With the completion of beautiful Willow Creek Golf Course, Northampton's growth jumped across Willow Creek into an area off Northcrest Drive now called The Greens of Northampton. Many of these palatial homes back up to the greens and fairways. The golf club was finished in the 1980s by a small group of resident golfers. This came after the Corps of Engineers redrew the flood plain boundary, releasing the golf course area and surrounding home sites.

This growth helped influence the extension of Northcrest to join Rayford Road, an important development for those living in homes in The Woods of Northampton whose only entrance previously was from Gosling Road. Although developed in 1972 by Northampton founder Glenn McMillan, The Woods of Northampton off Rayford Road did not have direct access to the rest of the subdivision. The extension of Northcrest changed that and also provided a rear exit on Gosling Road to the rest of Northampton. (Note from pineda: Gosling now extends across Spring Creek into the Woodlands and all the way north to F.M. 242. Plans are now in the works to extend Gosling even further to F.M. 1488. At this time, Gosling is being extended across F.M. 2920 to the south to connect to the main entrance at the Windrose subdivision. This should help the folks out in Windrose who have no signal lights enabling them to get out of Windrose onto Kuykendahl.

Edited by pineda
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Okay, once more, it's wasn't "forest land", it was a pasture, just to clarify things.

Also, the land that eventually became Northampton is under the auspices of the Northampton MUD. The land you are referring to is under the auspices of Bridgestone MUD, two different entities, with different goals.

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The buildings ARE temporary. They've only been there two years, while Krimmel was being built. So the statement "They should have never let it get that bad" really doesn't make much sense.

I dunno, I think a year is long enough.

They should really scope out the neighborhood for capacity before the under-build.

It is always cheaper to build a school right the first time, than save money on the short term only to spend more of it later when cost of materials and labor goes up. :mellow:

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I dunno, I think a year is long enough.

They should really scope out the neighborhood for capacity before the under-build.

It is always cheaper to build a school right the first time, than save money on the short term only to spend more of it later when cost of materials and labor goes up. :mellow:

I went to River Oaks Elementary School for three years (grades 3 through 5) - It took several years for ROES to replace the buildings with a large addition. My main classrooms were in T-buildings when I was in grades 4 through 5.

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It is always cheaper to build a school right the first time, than save money on the short term only to spend more of it later when cost of materials and labor goes up.

What the heck are you trying to say here?

Are you actually trying to say that the members of the Klein ISD school board in 1973 should have had Hildebrandt built even larger than they did, in order to accomodate temporary overcrowding in 2006? :huh:

Edited by pineda
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I am not saying the board in 1973 should have built Hildebrandt bigger, because the didn't know 34 years later it would be to small and over capacity. Krimmel is being built to resolve the problem. The district is doing a great job with the situation. I was just giving my outlook on the whole situation.

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Thanks, Chris, but I was really responding to Puma...

I think the KISD school board is doing a great job with the situation at Hildebrandt this year, too.

I look forward to Krimmel opening next year and losing almost half the current population at Hildebrandt.

I'm sure the kids rezoned there will be thrilled to be getting a bright and shiny new school, and we'll be happy to see the hallways cleared out a little more in our perfectly fine school, thanks. :D

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...
Just to set the record straight: Hildebrandt is not in disrepair. Granted, it's not Klein Collins or College Park High School in the Woodlands, but it's perfectly fine the way it is.

There really is no need to radically change or upgrade anything about the building itself. The most important part of any school is really not the building, it's the teachers. Hildebrandt has really good teachers and administrators, and the kids seem to be pretty happy there, despite the fact that "It's in the middle of nowhere like were a bunch of cows and open land is." :P

Klein Collins is nice, very nice, but I was at Klein High School last week and their open plaza and areas are really cool.

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  • 1 month later...

Yes, his name is Frank Lemmon, a longtime resident of Northampton and everyone loves him! :wub: And, actually he's an interim principal, until the district picks a new one. This gives Scott Crowe time now to get his new school ready. He will office out of Hildebrandt, but will no longer be concerned with the day-to-day business of Hildebrandt. This way he'll be ready to hit the ground running when Krimmel opens. We're very fortunate that the district gives Mr. Crowe this time frame in which to get ready, and lucky to get Mr. Lemmon back in the school he once ran. Many of his former students are now parents of children who attend Hildebrandt, and are really looking forward to seeing him again. It's a win-win situation.

Edited by pineda
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