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Memorial Area


ekarl17

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What makes the memorial area so affluent, despite of the huge lots, and nice homes. To which all of them lead to nice families to move in, and then the schools turn out to be nice too. But what else? I mean what if I'm developing a new master-planned community, what should I do to make my new master-planned community in to a new memorial area?

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Remember, that when Memorial was built, it was NOT "centrally located", it was considered "The Boonies", but alot of oil execs and the like were moving out that way so their families wouldn't have to be around the hustle and bustle of the city and they were building all those fantastic homes, with each new one being built getting larger and better. "You gotta keep up with the Joneses" you know, and Memorial was and IS the hotbed for that. Hedwig Village, Bunker Hill, Hunter's Creek and places like this in the Memorial area, have their own police departments, and heavily enforce their HOA rules. They try very very hard to keep the riff raff OUT of their territory, these are just a few of the things it takes to keep your property values continuously going UP ! Mature lots, excellently kept up homes, and variety in those homes,not cookie cutters, help keep the market and property values up also.

Edited by TJones
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What makes the memorial area so affluent, despite of the huge lots, and nice homes. To which all of them lead to nice families to move in, and then the schools turn out to be nice too. But what else? I mean what if I'm developing a new master-planned community, what should I do to make my new master-planned community in to a new memorial area?

My inlaws moved "way out there" to the Memorial area (now it is Hunter's Creek) back in the early 50's. They bought a couple of acres, but later subdivided. We recently inherited the home, which is on 3/4 acre. The Memorial Villages are like living in a small town. I also like that it is zoned -- no convenience stores or strip shopping centers on every corner. It's hard to believe that you're living inside a huge city. It's very quiet. I love all the trees, and the other poster was right about them keeping up with the deed restrictions. The police force is very responsive, and I can say that I feel safe.

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My inlaws moved "way out there" to the Memorial area (now it is Hunter's Creek) back in the early 50's. They bought a couple of acres, but later subdivided. We recently inherited the home, which is on 3/4 acre. The Memorial Villages are like living in a small town. I also like that it is zoned -- no convenience stores or strip shopping centers on every corner. It's hard to believe that you're living inside a huge city. It's very quiet. I love all the trees, and the other poster was right about them keeping up with the deed restrictions. The police force is very responsive, and I can say that I feel safe.

The rise of "Master Planning" is the reason we will never see anymore areas like the Memorial villages built anymore. Admittedly, some of the newer neighborhoods around Gessner and Memorial and points west were "planned" in the 1950s, but the early villages closer-in developed pretty much piece-meal as people bought land, built houses and moved in. And yes they were very far out in the country when that started back in the 20s and 30s.

That's why much of Memorial doesn't have the cookie-cutter look and feel so characteristic of "Master Planning" -- little boxes all made out of ticky tacky that all look just the same. It's also why it's still possible to find some very large properties there in the heart of Memorial.

Edited by FilioScotia
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the memorial area was gift of land from memorial park to hwy 6. it was master planned as was the woodlands.

the bering family owned the land which was bordered by i-10 to the north, voss to the west, westheimer to the south, and chimney rock/silber to the east.

it was all flood land and rice farms before the build up. there is only one stretch of memorial which looks semi-bad and thats from dairy ashford to kirkwood, but holm is planning on changing that by creating center medians with mature trees, etc.

also something which should have not been done was the army core of engineers re-structuring of buffalo bayou. its like a straight line from hwy 6 to the beltway and then it starts to look better.

but if you want to build a new in memorial tear down/screw over the low income housing residents which are bordered by i-10 to the north, tully to the west, memorial to the south, and bateswood to the east and construct a new residential community. the apartment owners are looking to sell...

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but if you want to build a new in memorial tear down/screw over the low income housing residents which are bordered by i-10 to the north, tully to the west, memorial to the south, and bateswood to the east and construct a new residential community. the apartment owners are looking to sell...

I'm all for tearing down all the old apartments. I hope that's true that the apartment owners are looking to sell.

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The rise of "Master Planning" is the reason we will never see anymore areas like the Memorial villages built anymore. Admittedly, some of the newer neighborhoods around Gessner and Memorial and points west were "planned" in the 1950s, but the early villages closer-in developed pretty much piece-meal as people bought land, built houses and moved in. And yes they were very far out in the country when that started back in the 20s and 30s.

That's why much of Memorial doesn't have the cookie-cutter look and feel so characteristic of "Master Planning" -- little boxes all made out of ticky tacky that all look just the same. It's also why it's still possible to find some very large properties there in the heart of Memorial.

Many of the master planned communities have houses that all look the same. Cookie-cutter is right. You're right -- people would go out and buy land in Memorial and build their houses. There isn't another house that has the same floorplan. Little by little, the older homes are being sold, then torn down, and huge houses are built on the lot. As long as the lot is big enough for that size house, I don't mind. I just don't like huge houses that barely fit on the lot.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Cookie cutter housing isn't necessarily bad, just most of it is. It's the lack of architectural style that makes most cookie cutter homes in suburbia cheap, that and the fact that they are small and cheaply built.

In San Francisco, they have streets lined with houses that are all exactly the same, but because of the cost of living in the city and the homes being architecturally pleasing and well built, they retain value.

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Cookie cutter housing isn't necessarily bad, just most of it is. It's the lack of architectural style that makes most cookie cutter homes in suburbia cheap, that and the fact that they are small and cheaply built.

In San Francisco, they have streets lined with houses that are all exactly the same, but because of the cost of living in the city and the homes being architecturally pleasing and well built, they retain value.

what qualifications do you have to determine if a house is cheaply built? How would you know anyways how well a particular block of houses is built in suburbia. There are lots by the way, and lots of builders, so don't tell me I know someone who.... blah

So you think there are more well built houses in the city than the new or newer ones built in suburbia with new building codes, standards, and public demand for better building standards?

so all houses in suburbia are small too?

And they don't have any architectural details?

and cookie cutter. I am learning alot here, thanks.

sounds like you are generalizing and to no good effect.

I get tired of the same retorict, where do you live? We can't all live in memorial by the way?

The rise of "Master Planning" is the reason we will never see anymore areas like the Memorial villages built anymore. Admittedly, some of the newer neighborhoods around Gessner and Memorial and points west were "planned" in the 1950s, but the early villages closer-in developed pretty much piece-meal as people bought land, built houses and moved in. And yes they were very far out in the country when that started back in the 20s and 30s.

That's why much of Memorial doesn't have the cookie-cutter look and feel so characteristic of "Master Planning" -- little boxes all made out of ticky tacky that all look just the same. It's also why it's still possible to find some very large properties there in the heart of Memorial.

little boxes of similar looking ticky tacky?

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I have news for you. The cookie cutter look has moved in :( The street i grew up on is now home to some very monstrously large Medit. styled homes. That hideous Medit mess is spreading like a bad cancer. My parents have right around 2 acres there and im sure they will be getting calls to sell and divide soon.

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I'm thinking of a particular type of cuttie-cutter housing when I think of the bad ones. I'm thinking of really small homes like the ones out on 529 or in the north Katy area that sell for 80 or 90k, very close together, all brick exterior, with no stylistic detail and no architectural value. I'm just guessing they're cheaply built, because they build them so quickly. If there were quality workmanship involved it should take much longer to build. I'm saying that some types of cookie-cutter development can be nice and desirable.

I tend to prefer custom homes though, such as the ones in the Memorial Area. I honestly have not seen any cookie cutter homes anywhere in the Memorial area, unless we're talking about little enclaves of patio homes and town homes here and there.

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I have news for you. The cookie cutter look has moved in :( The street i grew up on is now home to some very monstrously large Medit. styled homes. That hideous Medit mess is spreading like a bad cancer. My parents have right around 2 acres there and im sure they will be getting calls to sell and divide soon.

if you parents have 2 acres in Memorial, i'll buy....

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What makes the Memorial area so affluent, despite of the huge lots, and nice homes. To which all of them lead to nice families to move in, and then the schools turn out to be nice too. But what else? I mean what if I'm developing a new master-planned community, what should I do to make my new master-planned community in to a new memorial area?

Well first you have convince masses of old Houston families to move to a master planned community.....that will never happen. Master plans have no exclusivity or privacy, which Memorial/Tanglewood has in the droves. Its a hard thing to give up. Also, master plan communities have a huge transient population, so pride in "THE neighborhood" never establishes.

So for starters: no strips malls,gas stations, apartment complexes, full acre wooded lots, private patrols or a neighborhood loyal police department, several exclusive membership clubs, close to town,incredible schools, great culture and resturants, great pride in the neighborhood and families that live there for generations....so yeah, there will never be another Memorial. But if you can tap into a few of those things, maybe you will create something that will be nice.

JUST NO STRIP MALLS!

Thank you

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Well first you have convince masses of old Houston families to move to a master planned community.....that will never happen. Master plans have no exclusivity or privacy, which Memorial/Tanglewood has in the droves. Its a hard thing to give up. Also, master plan communities have a huge transient population, so pride in "THE neighborhood" never establishes.

So for starters: no strips malls,gas stations, apartment complexes, full acre wooded lots, private patrols or a neighborhood loyal police department, several exclusive membership clubs, close to town,incredible schools, great culture and resturants, great pride in the neighborhood and families that live there for generations....so yeah, there will never be another Memorial. But if you can tap into a few of those things, maybe you will create something that will be nice.

JUST NO STRIP MALLS!

Thank you

Fonn Villas and Memorial Meadows are pretty close to the "strip malls". The community has retained its value well, hasn't it?

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Fonn Villas and Memorial Meadows are pretty close to the "strip malls". The community has retained its value well, hasn't it?

Fonn Villas has appreciated in the past few years, mostly from families willing to live in older homes on smaller lots to get into those SBISD school. But the lots are so tiny, they aren't the true "Village Acre" Memorial homes I think the poster was asking about. I always called the area around the beltway and west, Memorial Extra Light.

PS- I think the prices in Fonn Villas and Frostwood are over inflated at this point. But you never know, Houston keeps on trucking.

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  • 10 months later...
I'm thinking of a particular type of cuttie-cutter housing when I think of the bad ones. I'm thinking of really small homes like the ones out on 529 or in the north Katy area that sell for 80 or 90k, very close together, all brick exterior, with no stylistic detail and no architectural value. I'm just guessing they're cheaply built, because they build them so quickly. If there were quality workmanship involved it should take much longer to build. I'm saying that some types of cookie-cutter development can be nice and desirable.

I tend to prefer custom homes though, such as the ones in the Memorial Area. I honestly have not seen any cookie cutter homes anywhere in the Memorial area, unless we're talking about little enclaves of patio homes and town homes here and there.

We just moved into a 4 bedroom house in Sherwood Oaks, they told us that no two houses in the neighborhood are alike. THERE'S 5 OF MY HOUSE HERE!! And i've seen several in both wilchesters, nottingham forest and westchester. We also have several friends who have the exact same house, just a different color.

Edited by el chileno
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Memorial is so expensive because the Villages are their own incorporated entities. They go to Spring Branch Independent School District which has a great reputation. Along with the reputation are high taxes to support the good schools. It is expensive to live there which weeds out the masses. Builds on itself....

Some bits of Hunters Creek Village and Piney Point Village south of the bayou are in Houston ISD.

The bit of Hunters Creek in HISD is zoned to:

* Briargrove ES

* Grady MS

* Lee HS (Lamar HS and Westside HS are options)

And the bit of Piney Point in HISD is zoned to:

* Emerson ES

* Revere MS

* Lee HS (Lamar HS and Westside HS are options)

I would rezone the portions of those two cities to the Memorial HS feeder pattern, but then again the portions are in separate school districts...

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Once you start painting the brick, the homes start looking less cookie cutter, but make no mistake, many of the homes in neighborhoods like Frostwood, Fonn Villas, are the same as those in Memorial Forest, Wilchester, Nottingham and across the bayou in Briargrove Park. Similar plans. Me, I'm a big fan of those 1960's colonials and love the Memorial area. To say there's no "cookie cutter" is not entirely accurate.

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Once you start painting the brick, the homes start looking less cookie cutter, but make no mistake, many of the homes in neighborhoods like Frostwood, Fonn Villas, are the same as those in Memorial Forest, Wilchester, Nottingham and across the bayou in Briargrove Park. Similar plans. Me, I'm a big fan of those 1960's colonials and love the Memorial area. To say there's no "cookie cutter" is not entirely accurate.

There are similar plans around, but after 50 years of remodeling they hardly look alike on the inside. Most have even changed moderately on the outside. I find these old Memorial homes to have more character than the newer ones. All those peeked rooves get to you after a while.

We ended up in a Georgian. There is one two streets back that probably was the same plan but things have been added etc, and we plan to enhance the facade by adding some tweaks.

Too me Village Builder, and their plans with names, and having 15 of the exact homes per street are the most guilty of the cookie cutter label.

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There are similar plans around, but after 50 years of remodeling they hardly look alike on the inside. Most have even changed moderately on the outside. I find these old Memorial homes to have more character than the newer ones. All those peeked rooves get to you after a while.

We ended up in a Georgian. There is one two streets back that probably was the same plan but things have been added etc, and we plan to enhance the facade by adding some tweaks.

Too me Village Builder, and their plans with names, and having 15 of the exact homes per street are the most guilty of the cookie cutter label.

I live in a 1965 house in Nottingham Forest and tend to agree with you. Yeah, there are a few houses in the neighborhood that are similar to mine, but it seems back then, even if there were only a finite number of exterior styles, there were still many more styles available than subdivision developers and builders now offer. My brother lived out in Grand Lakes in Katy until last year, with big houses, but about every fourth house looks alike on the outside. And inside it was all white walls, offwhite tiles, and beige carpeting, and super-glossy hardwoods. And yeah, with all the interior renovations and painting that has been done to my house over the years, it definitely does not have that sterile new house look, and certainly doesn't look like any other house in the neighborhood inside.

On the issue of peaked roofs, yeah, some of the 60s modern houses in the area, the "Brady Bunch Style" as I call them, look kind of fun and quirky, but I will take a peaked roof any day in a city with as much rainfall as Houston.

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