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Any info on Leslie Douglas Ashley that you can give me I would appreciate. I am hoping to find the child he had with his wife. That was before the sex change. I am trying to find this child because he has an Aunt and that Aunt would be my Mother. I know Douglas did some horrible things but I'm hoping his child turned out better than he did. I don't live in Houston so any help would be greatly appreciated

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Another murder from the fifties that comes to mind is the murder of William Boatner. He lived in the Hyde Park area with his parents. He came up missing and several days later his body was found stuffed in an abandoned refrigerator on West Gray. This was in the mid to late fifties. I am not totally sure but I do think I have the name correct. I don't remember who murdered the boy but I do remember the police connecting someone to his murder. Hopefully someone on this board will remember the incident and can add some more information. I do remember when I was going to Lanier Jr. High there was a boy in my homeroom that had been good friends with Bill Boatner.

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Any info on Leslie Douglas Ashley that you can give me I would appreciate. I am hoping to find the child he had with his wife. That was before the sex change. I am trying to find this child because he has an Aunt and that Aunt would be my Mother. I know Douglas did some horrible things but I'm hoping his child turned out better than he did. I don't live in Houston so any help would be greatly appreciated

 

I cannot give you any of the information you seek.  I do believe though, that there are agencies, individuals or others that may be employed to research for you.  Perhaps some genealogy sites might provide folks that do this.

 

I can only imagine why you want this information, and I hope you do get it.  I truly hope someone here can come up with more information in the direction of help.  That's one reason for my post, to bump this.

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Since his sex change, Ashley's name has been Leslie Elaine Perez.

 

"She" has led a very public life since then, including several races for seats on Houston City Council, and working with the Harris County Democratic Party. In 1990 she ran for the position of Party Chairman, but got less than 20 percent of the vote.

 

Maybe someone in the Party can point you in the right direction. Former Chair Gerry Birnberg or current Chair Lane Lewis might know.

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  • 3 months later...

As part of our research in writing "The Ice Box Murders" I reviewed the 8" x 10" Kodachrome color prints of the Rogers' murders at 1815 Driscoll Street on Father's Day, June 20, 1965. There were originally about 50 photos and the negatives were used so many times to make prints that they wore out. For many years photos were passed out at the HPD Police Academy in training. Every time they were passed out prints would be lost. Officers would take them home. In one instance, in our book an officer took his date to the homicide division to impress her with the pics. In another case they used them to scare the hell out of teenagers who had been partying in the house on Driscoll. The City had to tear the house down because it was a magnet for teenagers. Hollywood Cemetery has also had issues in the past. We were fortunate to be given many of Charles Rogers books and some notes that were retrieved from the house after the murders by a relative. We also were able to go with a treasure hunter to the site of the old house before the townhouse was built on the site. We salvaged old radio parts from the location, and bathroom floor tile. The same floor that Fred and Edwina were dismembered on. When the City demolished the house many of the items in the house were simply buried in the dirt. Hard to believe, but true. Yes, this case is unbelievable and the photos (if you are normal) will take your breath away. Since I knew that I would have to study them I spent a lot of time upfront reviewing the Journal of Forensic Pathology and forensic pathology textbooks. Homicide detectives are very special people and without a couple of special ones our book could have never been written. For more on The Ice Box Murders see http://iceboxmurders.com or visit the Amazon Kindle Store for a copy. And yes this is a one of a kind case. 

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One of the things that we determined when we wrote The Ice Box Murders was that Charles F. Rogers had a timeline. He didn't have an automobile. He did have a motorcycle. He had been riding motorcycles since the end of World War II, and would ride his motorcycle to class at the University of Houston. The Rogers' had a handyman who would come to the house at 1815 Driscoll Street from time to time. Edwina Rogers 1954 Cadillac had been up on blocks for about two weeks before the murders. The handyman was working on the car and would see Charles' motorcycle in the garage. It was not there after the murders, but it's not how Charles got out of Houston. Another common bit of misinformation is that Fred and Edwina Rogers owned the house at 1815 Driscoll Street. In fact, it was owned by Charles Rogers. Charles did not intend to leave the house when he did. He was waiting for a friend/associate from Kerrville to fly to Houston and pick him up. He got flushed out of the house early, but was still in the house for days after the murders. For more on The Ice Box Murders see http://iceboxmurders.com or visit the Amazon Kindle Store for a copy of the book. 

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Very interesting! In 2003 we were at the Mid-South Regional Book Show in Austin. We had a booth set-up promoting our book, which hadn't been released yet. At the end of the show on Sunday a very quiet woman from Katy sat down at our table after breakfast and told us that her father's bookie had been trained by Fred Rogers. What she told us blew us away! Fred was also active in real estate in Acres Homes, Independence Heights, and a number of other historically African-American neighborhoods. On many of the properties there was a "cloud" on the title and Fred would do various 'slight-of-hand' routines to take care of the issues. As forensic accountants we are trained to follow the money, but in our discussions with retired detectives on the case, the Rogers' handyman, and others who knew the family, they pretty much just used cash. Fred never had a social security number.

 

With respect to our book, pre-release sales were great and Saturn Films was interested in making a movie based on our book, but The Ice Box Murders was never officially released because of rights issues. Now that we have 100% of our rights we're trying to put the word out there so readers know it's available in the Amazon Kindle Store. First month sales have been very strong and after the very long road we've been on with this book it's appreciated.

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I don't think David was a close friend by any means. He told me that would see Fred as he walked past his house on Driscoll. He said one day that he spoke to him and they got introduced. He said from time to time that they would exchange a few words in passing. I have a question for you. Did Fred have a car? David seemed to think that was going to and from the bus stop on Westheimer when he would see him.

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The 1954 Cadillac in the driveway was Edwina's. The 1953 Oldsmobile was Fred's. Everything we found indicated that Fred rode the bus. Here is a link for our Facebook site for our book and the case: https://www.facebook.com/gardeniericebox This is an easier way to get in touch with us. We spent a lot of time on the family backgrounds of Fred and Edwina. Fred's dad was, until his death, the school superintendent in Comanche, Texas. I came pretty close to getting kicked out of the library by the director when I started asking questions about Fred's family. They have a huge photo of his family in a turn of the century car in the library. Fred isn't in the picture. When Fred's dad died they had a memorial parade in the town. He was very much beloved. Edwina's immediate family was very different from Fred's. Her twin brother, Edwin, was a hard worker and was very successful in the Shiro, Texas area.

 

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I stand corrected. Going back to our notes. Both cars belonged to Edwina. Fred never really mastered driving. This was further reinforced by the death of their daughter, Bettie, in an automobile accident coming back from San Antonio in August 1929.

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The 1954 Cadillac that belonged to Edwina Rogers was purchased by the Rogers' handyman. He had it towed to his upholstery shop and kept it for years with the intention of getting it running again. He finally gave up on the idea and sold it for junk.

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The name finally came to me, it was William Bodenheimer. I Googled it and found out he disappeared July 20th 1959. here is a link to the story.

http://www.houstonpress.com/2004-03-11/news/the-icebox-revisited/full/

The murder of Billy Bodenheimer was for my generation what the Dean Corll-Elmer Wayne Henley case was for a later generation - a brutal awakening to the horrors of the real world.  Well, it was for me, anyway, if not my whole generation.  There were probably lots of my generation as well as older people who didn't want to hear anything about the case at all.

 

Our next door neighbor's grandson who came to visit in Lake Jackson regularly went to school with Bodenheimer, though he was older and didn't claim to  be his friend.  Earlier in the decade, whenever we came to town and went out to visit relatives in the Heights, we passed right by the spot where the body was found; I have never been able to remember seeing such a yard, though.  I remember thinking that if I had lived in that neighborhood, Billy probably would've been a playmate of mine.

 

I followed the case, mostly in the Chronicle.  I wanted to know who could/would commit such a crime.  The rapidity with which the police announced the arrests was shocking and the story told by the police made no sense to me even as a kid.  In 1950s Houston, a gang of black boys gang rapes and murders a white boy - yeah, sure they did.  They all wanted to die and their knives weren't sharp enough to cut their own throats so they just thought they'd get the state to do it for them.

 

I didn't keep up with the trials, though.  Once they were indicted there was never any question they'd be convicted.

 

I saw the Press article when it first was published and it answered a lot of questions for me.  It was the first time I'd heard anything about the case in decades.  People didn't want to talk about this crime then and never have, much.

 

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Bill Bodenheimer was few grades behind me in school. I didn't know him but had a friend that did. I remember the murder and all the publicity that surronded it very well. We lived on Sul Ross one block south of W. Alabama about a mile south of where Bill lived.

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I was getting ready to start my junior year at Pasadena High School when this happened in July of '59. Remember, this was when Houston had three daily newspapers - the Chronicle, the Post and the old Scripps-Howard Houston Press. (no relation to the Press we know today)

 

All three papers carried this story relentlesly in all its gory and sickening details from day one for weeks and months, while we lily white surbanites in Pasadena were counting our blessings every day. We went to bed at night believing with all our trembling white hearts that things like that only happened in Houston - not in Pasadena.

 

That 2004 Houston Press story really took me back to the summer of '59. It's weird how some small detail sticks in your mind. I remember the case of course, in a very general way, but the one tiny detail that sticks out for me is the word "molesterate", which one of the young black boys supposedly used in the "confession" he signed. Ever since 1959, that word has come back to me every time I think about this horrible story.

Edited by FilioScotia
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