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The Metro North Rail Line


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It was my understanding that most of the four BRT will have its own lane to drive on. Is this true? I read an article today on how BRT is becoming more popular aroung the nation because it is cheaper and better for the enviroment. If our four inner loop BRT lines do have their own lane majority of the route, it is smart, it may mean more money for other lines.

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It would be interesting to see if they use the current Main line ridership numbers to help justify their case for additional funds?

If it reached 40K daily riders a day at this stage, I wonder how it will develop in the future.

one thing I'm rather curious about is the number of riders along the line itself.

I wonder where what the numbers break down as far as origin and final destinations.

Meaning, how many people ride from the south station to Med Center or other locations. How how many people end one part of their commute, park near the HCC station and go to other areas and the like.

THOSE numbers to me would be rather interesting to look at as to how light rail is used.

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I think the inner lines should be light rail no matter what. Then as you get farther out, they go to BRT.

Thats a solution! But certain main lines that go to major places such as the airport, should be light rail or commuter rail.

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I think the inner lines should be light rail no matter what. Then as you get farther out, they go to BRT.

I think each line should have a consistent vehicle. Isn't it rather inconvenient to take an LRT vehicle to one point, then have to transfer to a BRT vehicle to continue down the same line?

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citykid, no one hates you, but we do wonder where you get your "facts" from. According to DART's website, DART rail cars hold 160 people. Houston METRO's rail cars hold 200, or 25% bigger. You might also be interested in knowing that Siemans, the German company that built Houston's light rail vehicles, is also building the same vehicles for Paris, France's light rail system. Now I know Paris is no Atlanta, but it's not bad. Some people even think Paris is almost as good as Dallas.

Looking at what you consider to be "real" rail, it is clear that you prefer 70s era heavy rail. If you knew how to read government documents, I'd suggest that you look at the FTA rules for funding transit systems. You'd probably figure out why cities are doing the things they do with respect to rail systems. But, since you don't read that stuff, you will always be hopelessly out of touch with your comments. But, we still enjoy chuckling at them.

So the stains on these seats will be called Siemen's stains?

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I don't think the Red line is a toy at all, I take it every day. It works very well. Of course I'd like to see better light synchronization and elimination of _ALL_ left hand turns, though. That could shave a few minutes off the trip.

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  • 4 months later...

thats good. I think this is a better thing for houston. Maybe later it would connect to the woodlands with maybe one or two stops on the way over their. Imaging this during the rodeo the people from the woodlands(and surronding areas) can take the light rail all the way to the rodeo without exchanging trains. This could be good for Houston.

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Light rail would be too slow. Commuter rail is better for them.

Not necessarily. Light rail is only slow (compared to commuter rail) in the inner city context where it is running in the streets making frequent stops. If it were to be extended out to Greenspoint/IAH and/or The Woodlands, there would probably be less frequent stops, it would probably be in a more-exclusive r-o-w. Houston's current light rail trains can go at least 60 MPH.

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I remember the train between downtown Toronto and downtown Montreal had Wifi, and that was awesome. I always got so much work done on the train! It wasn't exactly commuter rail though.

It made what would normally be a 6-7 hour drive (depending on traffic and weather - we have icy highways up north) a 4 hour train ride if you took the one non-stop express train that left at 5 pm. You could fly the same distance in an hour but it always cost more and when you added all of the additional times up (two taxi rides, walking through the terminal, security etc.), the train was actually pretty competitive.

Anyways, my point is, wifi on a train = awesome.

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  • 2 years later...

Can't believe we haven't even talked about this line in awhile, but here is a little good news on the topic:

From the Chron.

Today, much of the retail along the route where light-rail cars will travel includes tire shops, mom and pop Mexican restaurants, hair salons and check-cashing stores.

But national chains like Walgreens, Auto Zone, Family Dollar, Rent A Center and Payless all have relocated existing outlets within the Fulton Corridor.

When that happens, Freedman said, it's a sign of the stores' success and projected growth in the area.

Working families in the Near Northside strongly support basic retail businesses.

“You're not going to find a lot of cupcake places or tanning salons,” Freedman said. “When people go to spend their money, it's on the necessities.”

This is pretty much what I expect from the east side and south east lines. The only difference is that the Mexican bus lines might actually get a slight boost if they are close to a station as it would make it easier for customers go to to their stations.

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This is pretty much what I expect from the east side and south east lines. The only difference is that the Mexican bus lines might actually get a slight boost if they are close to a station as it would make it easier for customers go to to their stations.

That comment sparked a thought.

I wonder if there would be any merit to having the City or METRO fund construction of a central 'Bus-port'. By that, I'm thinking of a facility that might be integrated into the Hardy Yards intermodal station, where a large number of slots could be leased to the highest bidder just as is typically done at an airport. There'd be no expectation of profitability from the real estate side of things, but there would be benefits insofar as that 1) increased capacity utilization of transit at all hours of the day and night would result in higher fare revenues, 2) concession revenue could be significant, 3) it'd displace unsavory characters from neighborhoods to centralized facilities with a constant law enforcement presence, 4) direct competition between bus operators could serve to reduce ticket prices, and 5) a high-profile high-volume operation could be more effectively marketed to a wider audience and possibly allow for charter bus operators to provide more consistent and lower-cost services to niche market segments.

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That comment sparked a thought.

I wonder if there would be any merit to having the City or METRO fund construction of a central 'Bus-port'. By that, I'm thinking of a facility that might be integrated into the Hardy Yards intermodal station, where a large number of slots could be leased to the highest bidder just as is typically done at an airport. There'd be no expectation of profitability from the real estate side of things, but there would be benefits insofar as that 1) increased capacity utilization of transit at all hours of the day and night would result in higher fare revenues, 2) concession revenue could be significant, 3) it'd displace unsavory characters from neighborhoods to centralized facilities with a constant law enforcement presence, 4) direct competition between bus operators could serve to reduce ticket prices, and 5) a high-profile high-volume operation could be more effectively marketed to a wider audience and possibly allow for charter bus operators to provide more consistent and lower-cost services to niche market segments.

I have heard unconfirmed rumors that the Greyhound station may in fact move to the intermodal terminal as you have described.

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That comment sparked a thought.

I wonder if there would be any merit to having the City or METRO fund construction of a central 'Bus-port'. By that, I'm thinking of a facility that might be integrated into the Hardy Yards intermodal station, where a large number of slots could be leased to the highest bidder just as is typically done at an airport. There'd be no expectation of profitability from the real estate side of things, but there would be benefits insofar as that 1) increased capacity utilization of transit at all hours of the day and night would result in higher fare revenues, 2) concession revenue could be significant, 3) it'd displace unsavory characters from neighborhoods to centralized facilities with a constant law enforcement presence, 4) direct competition between bus operators could serve to reduce ticket prices, and 5) a high-profile high-volume operation could be more effectively marketed to a wider audience and possibly allow for charter bus operators to provide more consistent and lower-cost services to niche market segments.

That would be interesting, but I think Greyhound would have an unfair advantage in the bidding wars. I don't know what kind of profit structure they currently have, but I'm sure the various locations might spur them to put a more "modern" look into their operations. The facility across from Greyhound is a good example of how at least the appearance of being successful (or professional) and located on a line might offer them an advantage.

The "Mexican" bus stations are generally located in the communities they serve and you can find them in unexpected places. In one case, there is/was one located in the heights just inside the loop and another located quite close to the Whataburger on North Main at 45.

I have heard unconfirmed rumors that the Greyhound station may in fact move to the intermodal terminal as you have described.

Tell you what, if Greyhound DOES move into intermodal station, they really need to clean up what goes on around it.

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That would be interesting, but I think Greyhound would have an unfair advantage in the bidding wars. I don't know what kind of profit structure they currently have, but I'm sure the various locations might spur them to put a more "modern" look into their operations. The facility across from Greyhound is a good example of how at least the appearance of being successful (or professional) and located on a line might offer them an advantage.

It'd all look the same; nobody would get the advantage. That is...unless they switch out their local livery. And if they do...seriously, what's the problem if their customers like it and are constituents. Also, the next lowest bidder for slots isn't going to bid on slots until the price is low enough that they can compete with Greyhound, but with the goal being maximal capacity utilization, the price of slots would probably be reasonably low.

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  • 11 months later...
  • 3 weeks later...

Does this have to do with the concrete supports that they are putting up in that area?

I didn't think it would be necessary, but I guess it does.

Sure would love to know the reasoning behind it. Not second guessing, but just like to know the details of how and why, even though it will be seen after its completed.

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I present to you, elevated LRT at UofH downtown:

2011-05-29_19-09-51_37.jpg?t=1306730820

closer up

2011-05-29_19-09-58_674.jpg?t=1306730853

2011-05-29_19-10-06_657.jpg?t=1306730886

2011-05-29_19-10-11_280.jpg?t=1306730902

2011-05-29_19-10-15_358.jpg?t=1306730934

2011-05-29_19-10-19_944.jpg?t=1306730955

...and this is looking back from the other side of the tunnel

2011-05-29_19-10-51_576.jpg?t=1306730988

this is the rest of Main going north.. as you can see, most of it is shutdown

2011-05-29_19-10-57_572.jpg?t=1306731018

Edit: Actually now that I think about it, this is probably for cars only right? The rail will probably be placed in the tunnel..maybe?

Edited by Triton
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Edit: Actually now that I think about it, this is probably for cars only right? The rail will probably be placed in the tunnel..maybe?

From what I've seen, the elevated portion is for the LRT with an elevated burnett station. I forgot why they dismissed a tunnel option for it.

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  • 2 weeks later...

From what I've seen, the elevated portion is for the LRT with an elevated burnett station. I forgot why they dismissed a tunnel option for it.

Apparently, there was a crane accident over at Hogan @ N. Main that had to do with the rail construction. Ch. 13 is showing some shots of the overturned crane. I wonder if someone didn't add enough weight to the counterbalance.

Wondering when the Anti metro people will jump on this.

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  • 1 month later...

I took this with my spiffy new camera and thought I'd share this with you you guys. I did it for each line.

For the sake of sanity, I sped it up a tad and decided not to add a sound track for safe office viewing. :)

Oh come on.. ya could have at least added the "chica chica chica" of the train and the occasional steam engine whistle for our auditory pleasure.

Just kidding.. good job.

Edited by Highway6
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  • 3 weeks later...

so how the heck are UHD students supposed to get to class?

You never click on the source links do you.

There is an answer to your question.. but I'm not going to cater to your laziness. Click the link. Hell, you don't even have to read, your answer can be found in the pretty picture.

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I just realized, if I'm going to do a Current red line video, I need to get on it, I guess this sunday is vid day again.

So....should I use the filter again, go south-north, or north-south?

Initially, I just wanted to do it during a busy day to show how often the train would pass me. On a slow sunday, I think I would beat the rail.

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  • 4 months later...

I drove along the north line after checking out Radical Eats (vegan Mexican food) and it was looking really good. I'm amazed at how much progress there has been.

Here are a couple poor quality car window photos I took:

img1577e.jpg

img1575ps.jpg

img1574pj.jpg

img1573f.jpg

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  • 2 months later...

Had some time on friday, so I went by the Light rail construction of the bridge modifications at the UHDT section.

This is looking over the computer fence looking north.

th_DSC07879.jpg

This is the view from directly below the the bridge to the road leading towards main street. So to speak.

th_DSC07882.jpg

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 3 months later...
  • 2 weeks later...

When this line is operational will the trains run the entire length of this line and the main street line, or will I have to transfer to another train at the UH Downtown stop? If they run the full length will the time between trains increase? Just wondering...

They will run the full length. No transfer required. Time between trains will not increase.

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