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farhan007

How international is Houston

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I dont think Dallas will ever "catch up" with Houston to be considered as much of a melting pot.  The big airport in Dallas with a new international terminal might give the metroplex an immigration boost, but the big ship yard in Houston is a much stronger immigration magnet.

The two cities would do each other a favor if they could just get over it and officially combined efforts to attract more international business.

This was taken from the Dallas Forum:

Study: Area is international center

By Diane Smith

Star-Telegram Staff Writer

DALLAS - North Texas is an international center that draws immigrants from across the globe in search of safety and economic opportunities, according to a study released Wednesday.

"Immigrants bring energy and excitement to North Texas," said Anne Marie Weiss-Armush, president of DFW International. The North Texas organization compiled the report to assess how much immigration has grown in the region since the 2000 Census.

The group, an umbrella organization for area ethnic groups, hopes that these findings will help state and local policymakers and educators understand the region's changing demographics, Weiss-Armush said during a news conference at Dallas City Hall.

In 2002, 35 percent of North Texas residents were immigrants. Now, 40 percent are immigrants, defined as foreign-born residents and their children living in Dallas, Tarrant, Collin and Denton counties.

Immigrants were able to find work despite the sluggish economy because the Metroplex still experienced employment growth, said Bernard Weinstein, director for the Center for Economic Development and Research at the University of North Texas.

Immigrants often form new communities as they arrive, Weiss-Armush said. The area along Dallas' Greenville Avenue and east of Park Lane is called Little Ethiopia. Pakistani and Mexican markets vie for space in Arlington while a "Chinatown" has emerged in Richardson.

The study indicates that English is not the first language spoken in 26.3 percent of North Texas homes. In Arlington, 31 percent of residents don't speak English at home.

Weiss-Armush said the number of undocumented immigrants also continues to grow. Many of these newcomers are uninsured and working for subsistence wages.

Immigrants arrive even as the United States debates tighter immigration controls. Since the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, the government has increased the number of border patrol agents on the border with Canada and reassigned others to the Arizona-Mexico border, where many undocumented people attempt to cross. It has also increased remote video surveillance and the use of cameras to detect illegal crossings.

The United States has also tightened its scrutiny of international tourists.

"It has become very difficult for people to come legally to this country," said Jorge Herrera, a member of DFW International's board of directors.

Despite these controls, undocumented immigrants continue to cross into the United States searching for jobs. Herrera said the American ideal -- that hard work enables families to emerge from poverty -- is a strong draw to this region.

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^nice

so mr. hornblower, do you think there is a correlation between international cities and fattest cities?

I don't believe in that Men's Fitness "Fattest Cities" deal.

I live in San Diego, supposedly one of the 4 top "slimmest" cities but I see just as many overweight people here as in Houston, relatively speaking. It still has the strip centers, the fast food culture, freeways 'n automobile culture...all the things that are generally American with their attendant negative aspects.

I know Southern California has an overblown image to keep up but obesity and bad diet are generally an all-American problem not just that of Philly, Chicago, Detroit, Houston or cities that Men's Fitness doesn't like. I mean how does a car culture, fast-food crazy city like Los Angeles not be in the same rank as those other "fat" big cities? People take public transit and walk more in Chicago than L.A.

The bizarre sense of formulae that Men's Fitness comes up, calculating the humid days with vitamin shops among other criteria...is B.S. (Men's Fitness is a SoCal-based rag, by the way.) If we go by Men's Fitness bizarre mindset, then the fact that the In-N-Out Burger is so canonized in California while there is no one corresponding burger joint in Houston that gets Houstonians all equally stoked...should be factored in significantly.

There are x amount of people in Houston who work out, no more or less than in San Diego, and no amount of "humidity" turns away an impressive number of strollers and joggers who are out in Memorial Park on any given August day.

Heck, I see more fitness centers in Houston than in San Diego.

Lastly, a Centers for Disease Control study, more accurate than some Men's Fitness SoCal propaganda, spotted San Diego as being number 4 in terms of "obese adults" concerns while Houston was not even in the top 10.

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I don't believe in that Men's Fitness "Fattest Cities" deal.

I live in San Diego, supposedly one of the 4 top "slimmest" cities but I see just as many overweight people here as in Houston, relatively speaking.  It still has the strip centers, the fast food culture, freeways 'n automobile culture...all the things that are generally American with their attendant negative aspects.

I know Southern California has an overblown image to keep up but obesity and bad diet are generally an all-American problem not just that of Philly, Chicago, Detroit, Houston or cities that Men's Fitness doesn't like.  I mean how does a car culture, fast-food crazy city like Los Angeles not be in the same rank as those other "fat" big cities?  People take public transit and walk more in Chicago than L.A.

The bizarre sense of formulae that Men's Fitness comes up, calculating the humid days with vitamin shops among other criteria...is B.S.  (Men's Fitness is a SoCal-based rag, by the way.)  If we go by Men's Fitness bizarre mindset, then the fact that the In-N-Out Burger is so canonized in California while there is no one corresponding burger joint in Houston that gets Houstonians all equally stoked...should be factored in significantly.

There are x amount of people in Houston who work out, no more or less than in San Diego, and no amount of "humidity" turns away an impressive number of strollers and joggers who are out in Memorial Park on any given August day.

Heck, I see more fitness centers in Houston than in San Diego.

Lastly, a Centers for Disease Control study, more accurate than some Men's Fitness SoCal propaganda, spotted San Diego as being number 4 in terms of "obese adults" concerns while Houston was not even in the top 10.

Agreed. That Mens Fitness thing is total crap. It is absolutely remarkable (and shameful) that it gets all the publicity it does from "news" media. It is fraudulent to announce the "nation's fattest city" based on a bunch of fairly random criteria (criteria which is generally not very well examined at that) ONLY ONE OF WHICH is the actual level of obesity. And, as usual with bad publicity, Houston (in general, and the Chronicle specifically) buys right into it and hangs its head in shame. I, for one, refuse to buy Mens Fitness magazine because of this annual fraud. If I can't trust them on that, why would I trust them to give me fitness advice?

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This was taken from the Dallas Forum:

Study: Area is international center

By Diane Smith

Star-Telegram Staff Writer

DALLAS - North Texas is an international center that draws immigrants from across the globe in search of safety and economic opportunities, according to a study released Wednesday.

"Immigrants bring energy and excitement to North Texas," said Anne Marie Weiss-Armush, president of DFW International. The North Texas organization compiled the report to assess how much immigration has grown in the region since the 2000 Census.

The group, an umbrella organization for area ethnic groups, hopes that these findings will help state and local policymakers and educators understand the region's changing demographics, Weiss-Armush said during a news conference at Dallas City Hall.

In 2002, 35 percent of North Texas residents were immigrants. Now, 40 percent are immigrants, defined as foreign-born residents and their children living in Dallas, Tarrant, Collin and Denton counties.

Immigrants were able to find work despite the sluggish economy because the Metroplex still experienced employment growth, said Bernard Weinstein, director for the Center for Economic Development and Research at the University of North Texas.

Immigrants often form new communities as they arrive, Weiss-Armush said. The area along Dallas' Greenville Avenue and east of Park Lane is called Little Ethiopia. Pakistani and Mexican markets vie for space in Arlington while a "Chinatown" has emerged in Richardson.

The study indicates that English is not the first language spoken in 26.3 percent of North Texas homes. In Arlington, 31 percent of residents don't speak English at home.

Weiss-Armush said the number of undocumented immigrants also continues to grow. Many of these newcomers are uninsured and working for subsistence wages.

Immigrants arrive even as the United States debates tighter immigration controls. Since the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, the government has increased the number of border patrol agents on the border with Canada and reassigned others to the Arizona-Mexico border, where many undocumented people attempt to cross. It has also increased remote video surveillance and the use of cameras to detect illegal crossings.

The United States has also tightened its scrutiny of international tourists.

"It has become very difficult for people to come legally to this country," said Jorge Herrera, a member of DFW International's board of directors.

Despite these controls, undocumented immigrants continue to cross into the United States searching for jobs. Herrera said the American ideal -- that hard work enables families to emerge from poverty -- is a strong draw to this region.

Personally, I don't deny that Dallas is a diverse city. In fact, I'm downright glad it is. When I once had to drop off a friend in New Mexico and dipped down to I-20, zipping to D/FW for a grand pit stop before heading to Houston...I was glad to see Pakistanis manning the convenience store in the outer Fort Worth environs! Being of Filipino ancestry myself, it was a relief after driving through those cowtowns. But folks were nice in Abilene, Amarillo and such (maybe I was just fortunate or Texas homefolks aren't as bad as they say?).

But totally multi-faceted Houston is still "the Los Angeles" of the SE quadrant of the USA (oops Miami, the glitzy palm tree place that has no significant permanent Asian, African and Middle Eastern presence).

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If anyone knows of a Houston website similar to this one for the Dallas area, I would love to know the address:

http://dfwinternational.org/index.php

While 40% of Metroplex Core County residents are immigrants, defined as foreign-born residents and their children, half of this immigrant population is from Mexico.

[Dallas, Tarrant, Collin, Denton = aprox 5 million residents; 5 x .4 = 2 million. Mexico (total) 1,000,000; (state of Guanajuato) 325,000; (state of San Luis Potosi) 250,000.].

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Is anyone else just a little skeptical about that article about D-FW immigrant population? 40% of the Metroplex population are immigrants??? and that percentage has risen by 5 points in only 3years??? I'm not sure I'm buying those numbers. Note that these numbers are thrown out there by an "interest group" (and swallowed whole with no skepticism whatsoever by the "journalist".)

According to the US Census, in 2000 the percent of foreign-born population in Dallas County was 20.9%. In Tarrant County: 12.7% Collin County: 13.3% Denton County: 9.4%

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If anyone knows of a Houston website similar to this one for the Dallas area, I would love to know the address:

http://dfwinternational.org/index.php

While 40% of Metroplex Core County residents are immigrants, defined as foreign-born residents and their children, half of this immigrant population is from Mexico.

[Dallas, Tarrant, Collin, Denton = aprox 5 million residents; 5 x .4 = 2 million.  Mexico (total) 1,000,000; (state of Guanajuato) 325,000; (state of San Luis Potosi) 250,000.].

Where did you get your total Mexican population figure?

The CIA Factbook has it as 104,959,594 (July 2004 est.)

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Well, the numbers could be skewed. If Hispanics make up at least 30-35%, then that would mean all other immigrants would only have to cover 5-10% to make their numbers work right?

What is it here for Houston?

Huh? Where did you get the "Hispanics make up at least 30-35%" factoid? And even if it is correct, how is it relevant? Not all Hispanics are immigrants.

Regarding Houston, the 2000 Census for Harris County shows 22.2% foreign born.

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^

Yeah, I noticed that little definitional "sleight of hand" ;-)

But I still don't think the numbers work. Overall, they are saying that the percentage is more than double what the overall percentage is for those four counties in 2000. Even allowing for children, given that a very large percentage of foreign-born persons are either already married when they come here or marry other foreign-born persons, they would have to be AVERAGING more than four children per couple.

I am trying to avoid spending all day crunching the numbers, but am I making any incorrect presumptions or calculations here?

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With this definition, the children of immigrants are included in the count although they are more accurately described as first generation Americans.  I do think this is a more-or-less fair way to describe the immigrant population; until the children of foreign-born residents age to the early teens, they exist entirely within the world of their parents.  As the children of foreign-born residents become young adults and enter the work force, most will have made the societal and cultural transformation away from their parents' point of origin.

so the children are counted as immigrants until they are 18?

i could see how this works in some cases, and also how it doesn't make any sense in others. if this were a subjective definition that would be ok, but immigrants are immigrants, there's no reason to have another definition other then to skew the numbers.

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^

I am trying to avoid spending all day crunching the numbers, but am I making any incorrect presumptions or calculations here?

must resist, must resist -- I'm inclined to say the slight of hand calculations are okay, swayed by the immigrant predisposition to have lots of kids. Numbers are much more crunchable after lunch....

Personally, the only working definition I'm comfortable with comes with the parameter, born here, Not an immigrant. I wonder if the Census data includes easy to find demographic break out of immigrant families to see the exact number of native children of foreign born parents.

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You missed what I was saying. I was saying that out of the 40% total, that if Hispanics made up 30 to 35% (of the total population - not the 40 percent) then that would mean that all other immigrants would make up the remaining 5-10% (of the total population - not the 40 percent).

This is not a factoid. I used the word if to begin my statement. Also, I'm not assuming that all Hispanics are immigrants, I'm assuming of the immigrants, Hispanic immigrants would represent the largest percentile. I don't think I have to explain that edutcated guess. The answer is 6 hours south of here.

No Facts, all assumptions.

While your assumption that the bulk of the immigrant population in D-FW is Hipanic is no doubt true, your assumption that 30-35% of the entire population of D-FW is comprised of Hispanic immigrants (even as defined in the subject article) strikes me as waaayyy to high.

If yall's post directly above is correct (and looking at the census numbers, it looks pretty reasonable), your assumption of 30-35% is impossible. If only 24% of the population is Hispanic, it's pretty obvious that 30-35% of the population cannot be Hispanic immigrants

Back to my skepticism about the numbers quoted in the article. The fact that they disclosed no source or methodology raises red flags for me. Of course that might just be because of the journalist being lazy or ignorant (or both), but it would be a lot more believable if we had some idea of how they came up with these numbers.

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In Houston it isn't IF there is food from any nation on this plant, but where are the best restaurants for your country's food. We have 'em all! :D

No, we're not NY. Thank God. I'd move.

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I hate the whole "we are world class" and "we are international" mentality.

If we are, it is something that is felt, it is something that is ubiquitous and noticed from the outside, not something that is declared.

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2112, it seems to me that you are mixing 3 separate statements into one. World clas is generally a marketing ploy, that may include the international aspect of a city. "We are international" points to the percentage of the population that is foreign, or of foreign descent. Clearly, Houston has a large international population, even if it is dominated by one nationality. In truth, not only does Houston have a large Latin American population, but also Asian and African.

As far as feeling international, that is more subjective, and probably has more to do with where one resides or is than anything else. If you hang out on the eastside, you'll probably feel it, southwest, you'll feel the asian influence, in the Woodlands or Katy, you'll feel southern US and not much else.

But, both in population and in business, Houston is definitely an international city.

Now, the world class thing, I'll leave that to the city boosters and others on this board. In that sense, I think it is overdone.

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"We are international" points to the percentage of the population that is foreign, or of foreign descent

Not to me.

It's more about how we interact with the cities of the world - commerce wise - The Londons, New Yorks, Milano, etc.

Not how many illegal aliens we have.

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All I'm saying is that it's slightly on the cheesy side to proclaim how international or world class we are. Tha'ts all. Don't get me wrong, I love the great diversity in this city, and yes, I do feel an international vibe to it all. I just dont like to proclaim it out right. It sorta reminds me of certain other cities that just love to point to themselves and remind everyone else how sophisticated they are. Not to mention any names or anything...

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:lol:

I agree that the cheerleaders annoy me. But, even NY and LA do it. Remember "I heart NY"? Cheesy ad campaign. LA has had some truly forgettable ones too, like the Randy Newman deal. That's the America we live in...brag to the world, even if it aint true.

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Man I'm gone for a while and the Dallas vs. Houston bashing is still on?

Theres bigger cities to fight then just each other folks. And the 30-35% guy, is basing it off of the 2million+ in the Houston City Limits, the whole 1/3rd White, 1/3rd Hispanic, 1/3rd Black cenus or-deal.

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I would like to add Seattle as one of most diverse friendly cities. Houston is diverse, but not as diverse friendly as LA, NY, and San Fran. Dallas is even worse than Houston. Snobs live in Dallas.

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I would like to add Seattle as one of most diverse friendly cities. Houston is diverse, but not as diverse friendly as LA, NY, and San Fran. Dallas is even worse than Houston. Snobs live in Dallas.

I have learned that people who move here from Dallas are so glad to get away that they would sell their first born child. It is totally a snobby and clickish small town.

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Guest danax

^Let's not ruin another thread with a childish back-and-forth with our Dallas brethren :rolleyes: .

And are those who feel so proud for being "international" and "diverse-friendly" being just a tad hypocritical when those same folks show little tolerance for citizens from another city 250 miles away? :closedeyes:

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^Let's not ruin another thread with a childish back-and-forth with our Dallas brethren :rolleyes: .

I agree,

I also have to agree with another members early response that Houston is light years behind cities like LA and no matter what anyone says LA will always be a trailblazer for innovation.

Basically anything "new" always has and will be in California period. Diversity is more widely accepted there. A person would have to live there to understand. (no snide remarks people).

This topic almost meshes with the other topics like Houston's perception & Image. It's true we are known for International importing/trading etc., but people-wise its slowly getting there.

The image seen from afar is rosey, but once people move here and experience it they become disenchanted. So you see this is such an open ended question as far as How International is Houston? Could go in numerous directions.

By the way, I don't care what people here say, LA will always be where the action is. Entertainment capitol of the world, like Randy Newman sang "I love LA".

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I agree,

I also have to agree with another members early response that Houston is light years behind cities like LA and no matter what anyone says LA will always be a trailblazer for innovation.

Basically anything "new" always has and will be in California period. Diversity is more widely accepted there. A person would have to live there to understand. (no snide remarks people).

This topic almost meshes with the other topics like Houston's perception & Image. It's true we are known for International importing/trading etc., but people-wise its slowly getting there.

The image seen from afar is rosey, but once people move here and experience it they become disenchanted. So you see this is such an open ended question as far as How International is Houston? Could go in numerous directions.

By the way, I don't care what people here say, LA will always be where the action is. Entertainment capitol of the world, like Randy Newman sang "I love LA".

It is not very clear how Houston is "light years" behind LA or New York in terms of diversity. I agree Los Angeles is the beacon but it certainly doesn't blow Houston away. Houston is very much the same as LA in terms of having different to multiple Chinatowns, Little Saigons, Koreatowns and other such attendant Asian conglomerations.

And walking all around NY's Chinatown trying to find a decent bowl of Vietnamese pho? No such luck, we finally had to settle for lasagna in neighboring Little Italy! OK, so what if NYC has more Puerto Ricans?

The vast swath of Bellaire Blvd west of US 59 is good match to LA's San Gabriel-Montetery Park area to me. And Houston accomplished that in less than 20 years when it all wasn't there before during my high school years. "Slow" my ---.

Heck, it's even easier to find Nigerian and Pakistani cafes in Houston than in LA for some reason. I know, I have regularly cruised around both towns and know them fairly well. As much as I love LA, I actually think people get along better. Wasn't it Houston, not LA, according to NY food critic John Mariani in 1993, that put Vietnamese food on the US culinary map?

Take a spin down Houston's SW side especially along Bellaire, Wilcrest, Beechnut, Hillcroft, Bissonnet, FM 1960 and then say Houston is "light years" behind. El Salvadoran coffee house next to a Vietnamese bida hall, Korean BBQ across a Colombian dance club...just like in LA.

"Slowly getting there" people wise? Well, Houston's Asian population increased by 80% from 1990 to 2000. That's not slow. It never has been slow since the Boom Years.

People become "disenchanted" with Houston once here? Actually it's the opposite. People from afar not knowing what to expect of Houston actually find out it's a memorable and entertaining city as it grows on them. I know, I am one of them. As much as I loved San Diego and my current Tampa Bay...I still find Houston more interesting, eccentric and endearing.

Being in California doesn't mean diddly squat. I lived in San Diego for four years...and that town doesn't come close to Houston in terms of diversity. To find some decent halal or even some good pupusas out there was a challenge. Houston's got the mosques en masse which seem to avoid Navy Town San Diego.

Houston's at least had a black mayor and liberal female mayor. San Diego hasn't had that, I don't believe. Lots of Dicky Murphy's running "America's Finest City." So where's the tolerance?

Let's not bash Houston on certain things simply because it's convenient or easy to do so while being relatively untrue. Bash it for its traffic and summertime humidity but not its rich diversity which has come close to matching LA and NY considering its youth.

As much as I love LA, Houston is THE new city where the newer though unannounced/unheralded even unintentional experiments seem to be happening. LA still looks the same as it did in the Rockford Files (I love watching it) more or less, just more crowded. Houston certainly doesn't look the same as it did in Sugarland Express or Brewster McCloud. According to NY architecture critic Ada Huxtable, "Houston is the place where scholars flock to for the purpose of seeing what modern civilization has wrought." So how's that for entertainment and action?

Edited by worldlyman

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It is not very clear how Houston is "light years" behind LA or New York in terms of diversity. I agree Los Angeles is the beacon but it certainly doesn't blow Houston away. Houston is very much the same as LA in terms of having different to multiple Chinatowns, Little Saigons, Koreatowns and other such attendant Asian conglomerations.

And walking all around NY's Chinatown trying to find a decent bowl of Vietnamese pho? No such luck, we finally had to settle for lasagna in neighboring Little Italy! OK, so what if NYC has more Puerto Ricans?

The vast swath of Bellaire Blvd west of US 59 is good match to LA's San Gabriel-Montetery Park area to me. And Houston accomplished that in less than 20 years when it all wasn't there before during my high school years. "Slow" my ---.

Heck, it's even easier to find Nigerian and Pakistani cafes in Houston than in LA for some reason. I know, I have regularly cruised around both towns and know them fairly well. As much as I love LA, I actually think people get along better. Wasn't it Houston, not LA, according to NY food critic John Mariani in 1993, that put Vietnamese food on the US culinary map?

Take a spin down Houston's SW side especially along Bellaire, Wilcrest, Beechnut, Hillcroft, Bissonnet, FM 1960 and then say Houston is "light years" behind. El Salvadoran coffee house next to a Vietnamese bida hall, Korean BBQ across a Colombian dance club...just like in LA.

"Slowly getting there" people wise? Well, Houston's Asian population increased by 80% from 1990 to 2000. That's not slow. It never has been slow since the Boom Years.

People become "disenchanted" with Houston once here? Actually it's the opposite. People from afar not knowing what to expect of Houston actually find out it's a memorable and entertaining city as it grows on them. I know, I am one of them. As much as I loved San Diego and my current Tampa Bay...I still find Houston more interesting, eccentric and endearing.

Being in California doesn't mean diddly squat. I lived in San Diego for four years...and that town doesn't come close to Houston in terms of diversity. To find some decent halal or even some good pupusas out there was a challenge. Houston's got the mosques en masse which seem to avoid Navy Town San Diego.

Houston's at least had a black mayor and liberal female mayor. San Diego hasn't had that, I don't believe. Lots of Dicky Murphy's running "America's Finest City." So where's the tolerance?

Let's not bash Houston on certain things simply because it's convenient or easy to do so while being relatively untrue. Bash it for its traffic and summertime humidity but not its rich diversity which has come close to matching LA and NY considering its youth.

As much as I love LA, Houston is THE new city where the newer though unannounced/unheralded even unintentional experiments seem to be happening. LA still looks the same as it did in the Rockford Files (I love watching it) more or less, just more crowded. Houston certainly doesn't look the same as it did in Sugarland Express or Brewster McCloud. According to NY architecture critic Ada Huxtable, "Houston is the place where scholars flock to for the purpose of seeing what modern civilization has wrought." So how's that for entertainment and action?

Some things i have to agree and disagree. True that SDiego is not diverse as Houston. I only saw one black person in Del Mar. Overall, it is not as diverse as i traveled throughout the city. The Vietnamese food in LA was not as good as Houston, IMO. However, they do have a Japanese town in LA which has excellent food. I don't mean just Sushi places either. I'm talking about a variety of Japanese food and even supermarket. Overall though, Houston has many types of restaurant which alot of other cities can't match.

I do think Houston is slow or "status quo" in many respects. Technology has been slow and coming. Also, when it comes to fashion, trendy bars, it is not close to ones in LA. Also, the mindset here in Houston is just too conservative, which is what it is. Just have to accept it. There's always some group opposed to some business opening or some expansion of road, etc.. In another thread, someone thought that a Coyote Ugly type club wouldn't make it in this town. I have to agree, because HPD Vice would probably raid it one day for being risque or something.

Yeah, Houston is diverse, but it is probably the most socially segrated diverse city. I don't know how many times i've been to bars, nightclubs, Starbucks, etc. in which i see many people of different cultures and race, but the Asians sit together one side, Caucasians together one another end, etc.. At least in San Diego, there isn't diversity to begin with, so at least they are segregated for that reason.

Edited by icanluv2

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I don't believe in that Men's Fitness "Fattest Cities" deal.

I live in San Diego, supposedly one of the 4 top "slimmest" cities but I see just as many overweight people here as in Houston, relatively speaking. It still has the strip centers, the fast food culture, freeways 'n automobile culture...all the things that are generally American with their attendant negative aspects.

I know Southern California has an overblown image to keep up but obesity and bad diet are generally an all-American problem not just that of Philly, Chicago, Detroit, Houston or cities that Men's Fitness doesn't like. I mean how does a car culture, fast-food crazy city like Los Angeles not be in the same rank as those other "fat" big cities? People take public transit and walk more in Chicago than L.A.

The bizarre sense of formulae that Men's Fitness comes up, calculating the humid days with vitamin shops among other criteria...is B.S. (Men's Fitness is a SoCal-based rag, by the way.) If we go by Men's Fitness bizarre mindset, then the fact that the In-N-Out Burger is so canonized in California while there is no one corresponding burger joint in Houston that gets Houstonians all equally stoked...should be factored in significantly.

There are x amount of people in Houston who work out, no more or less than in San Diego, and no amount of "humidity" turns away an impressive number of strollers and joggers who are out in Memorial Park on any given August day.

Heck, I see more fitness centers in Houston than in San Diego.

Lastly, a Centers for Disease Control study, more accurate than some Men's Fitness SoCal propaganda, spotted San Diego as being number 4 in terms of "obese adults" concerns while Houston was not even in the top 10.

I don't know dude, but when i was in SDiego, i saw alot of fit people. Many that jogged and biked with their dogs than i've ever seen in Houston.

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The city with most ethnic diversity in texas farhan is pretty simple, houston is. Houston is an international city. Houston also is a popular international destination, with more than 90 languages are spoken throughout the Houston area. So tell me, who's more ethnic diversity in texas?

I've heard it's more languages than that. Something in the 150s - 180s (didn't know that were that many languages actually).

Just check out some of the local colleges. They are like melting pots.

Also, many neighborhoods no longer have any ethnic majority (although many do) because so many different cultures are mixing and mingling in same areas.

Houston is very diverse.

Edited by houstonmacbro

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I've heard it's more languages than that. Something in the 150s - 180s (didn't know that were that many languages actually).

Just check out some of the local colleges. They are like melting pots.

Also, many neighborhoods no longer have any ethnic majority (although many do) because so many different cultures are mixing and mingling in same areas.

Houston is very diverse.

Are you serious? Or was your post supposed to make us laugh?

1- Universities and colleges are not melting pots. You know as well as I that the majority of professors on American campuses have the same liberal agenda and allow no opposition. Noam Chomsky is their hero and everyone else be damned. Perhaps students are melting under that pressure to conform to left-wing ideals...maybe you're right.

2-Houston neighborhoods all have an ethnic majority of Hispanic. Get real. Hispanics--illegal and otherwise-- are the vast majority in Houston except the really rich areas.

3-This is not an 'international city' (like why would that be a good thing---we hardly have any American cities left!). Houston is certainly not diverse. It's an American city overrun by anti-American Spanish speakers.

Finally, diversity is devisive. For the last 30 years, this hateful, racist policy of "embrace diversity" and "multiculturalism" has been shoved down the throats of Americans---don't swallow---it's segregationist and bad for you.

The diversity kick has got to go--it's time for unity.

Edited by Toggle3

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The diversity kick has got to go--it's time for unity.

...and it's obvious that you should lead that effort. <_<

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1. I bet you have not seen a "Young Republicans" club, huh?

Also, the first rule told to children seeking entrance to university and community colleges is that each university is different, and the student has to find the correct fit for himself or herself. You cannot paint all universities and colleges one color.

2. Look through the Super Neighborhoods here: http://www.houstontx.gov/planning/nbhd_svc...ap_w_links.html - There are a lot of blue collar Hispanic areas, yes. But there are also more mixed communities (Alief and Sharpstown come to mind), mostly African-American communities (Greater Third Ward, Sunnyside, Acres Homes, Independence Heights), suburban mixed White and Hispanic communities (Addicks and South Belt/Ellington), and suburban White communities (Kingwood, Clear Lake). Houston has many communities of different shapes and sizes. The demographics site has all of the data you need.

"3-This is not an 'international city' (like why would that be a good thing---we hardly have any American cities left!). Houston is certainly not diverse. It's an American city overrun by anti-American Spanish speakers."

We on HAIF have an issue we want you to resolve. We don't know what you are talking about!

* What is an "international city" (your definitions)?

* What is an "American city" ?

* How and why are Spanish speakers "anti-American" ? Why is this a bad thing?

With that said, HAIF disagrees with your post anyway.

Are you serious? Or was your post supposed to make us laugh?

1- Universities and colleges are not melting pots. You know as well as I that the majority of professors on American campuses have the same liberal agenda and allow no opposition. Noam Chomsky is their hero and everyone else be damned. Perhaps students are melting under that pressure to conform to left-wing ideals...maybe you're right.

2-Houston neighborhoods all have an ethnic majority of Hispanic. Get real. Hispanics--illegal and otherwise-- are the vast majority in Houston except the really rich areas.

3-This is not an 'international city' (like why would that be a good thing---we hardly have any American cities left!). Houston is certainly not diverse. It's an American city overrun by anti-American Spanish speakers.

Finally, diversity is devisive. For the last 30 years, this hateful, racist policy of "embrace diversity" and "multiculturalism" has been shoved down the throats of Americans---don't swallow---it's segregationist and bad for you.

The diversity kick has got to go--it's time for unity.

Edited by VicMan

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Are you serious? Or was your post supposed to make us laugh?

1- Universities and colleges are not melting pots. You know as well as I that the majority of professors on American campuses have the same liberal agenda and allow no opposition. Noam Chomsky is their hero and everyone else be damned. Perhaps students are melting under that pressure to conform to left-wing ideals...maybe you're right.

2-Houston neighborhoods all have an ethnic majority of Hispanic. Get real. Hispanics--illegal and otherwise-- are the vast majority in Houston except the really rich areas.

3-This is not an 'international city' (like why would that be a good thing---we hardly have any American cities left!). Houston is certainly not diverse. It's an American city overrun by anti-American Spanish speakers.

Finally, diversity is devisive. For the last 30 years, this hateful, racist policy of "embrace diversity" and "multiculturalism" has been shoved down the throats of Americans---don't swallow---it's segregationist and bad for you.

The diversity kick has got to go--it's time for unity.

Hispanics make up a large portion of the population here, but they are not the ONLY ones here in Houston. You really should get out more.

As for diversity being devisive? How?

Because there are certain segments of the population that don't WANT to hear about --or accept-- other points of view, or historical FACTS from some other perspective than white, anglo-saxon, male?

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I've heard it's more languages than that. Something in the 150s - 180s (didn't know that were that many languages actually).

There are approximately 6900 languages.

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Are you serious? Or was your post supposed to make us laugh?

1- Universities and colleges are not melting pots. You know as well as I that the majority of professors on American campuses have the same liberal agenda and allow no opposition. Noam Chomsky is their hero and everyone else be damned. Perhaps students are melting under that pressure to conform to left-wing ideals...maybe you're right.

2-Houston neighborhoods all have an ethnic majority of Hispanic. Get real. Hispanics--illegal and otherwise-- are the vast majority in Houston except the really rich areas.

3-This is not an 'international city' (like why would that be a good thing---we hardly have any American cities left!). Houston is certainly not diverse. It's an American city overrun by anti-American Spanish speakers.

Finally, diversity is devisive. For the last 30 years, this hateful, racist policy of "embrace diversity" and "multiculturalism" has been shoved down the throats of Americans---don't swallow---it's segregationist and bad for you.

The diversity kick has got to go--it's time for unity.

I nominate this post for most idiotic of all time.

Yeah, let's return to the good old days before Brown vs. Board of Education, before the repeal of Jim Crow, and before the advent of woman's suffrage because those days weren't nearly as devisive and segregated as today!

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The diversity kick has got to go--it's time for unity.

Wrong on the first part of statement, right on the second part! As diverse as Houston is, which is a great thing, i don't see much unity of different races here. I see it at public social settings alot in Houston.

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There's obviously a lot to be said for numbers when determining who's international, and who's not, but I prefer to look at how well the communities represent themselves. For this, we have to look at factors like commerce, cultural events, and interaction of all of the different levels of people. I am of the opinion that Houston is incredibly diverse, but that opinion is shaped by the fact that I work (and just graduated from) the University of Houston. A college campus can be an unfair representation of cultures, because everyone is frced to interact with one another. As for diversity in the city itself... we have to face facts that many of the international communities that move to the suburbs are assimilating into American culture, and not trying to be diverse. For instance a young kid living in The Woodlands might have little chance to experience the same diversity than someone in southwest Houston. In this respect, Houston is both wildly diverse and wildly suburban, white-wash and colorful.

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