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How international is Houston


farhan007

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Once again, Houston and Dallas are more similar than different.

Houston

Pop. 2000 1,953,631 %

White 601,851 30.81

Black 487,851 24.97

Asian 102,706 5.26

Hispanic 730,865 37.41

Other 30,358 1.55

Dallas

Pop. 2000 1,188,580 %

White 410,777 34.56

Black 304,824 25.65

Asian 31,626 2.66

Hispanic 422,587 35.55

Other 18,766 1.58

http://www.ersys.com/usa/48/index.htm

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Unquestionablly, there exists in Harris County pocket populations representing a greater variety of world cultures than exists Dallas County (these data come from county level rather than city or metro area out of convenience when using 2000 US Census data and for the benefit of reviewing a larger base population).

In my presentation of data, I'm hoping to avoid most of the confusion surrounding race versus ethnicity issues sprouting from the option among the ethinic Hispanic/Latino population to state race as either White or Black. I've probably made some typos and the format adds difficulty is viewing....

Harris County - 3,400,578

Race:

White - 58.7% ------ 1,997,123 - includes Hispanic ethnicity

Black - 18.5% -------- 628,619 - includes Hispanic ethnicity

Asian -- 5.1% --------- 174,626

Other - 17.7% --------- 600,210 - net: other, two or more, Native Am., Islander

Race/Ethnicity:

White only-- 42.1% ----1,432,264

Mexican --- 24.0%-----814,693

Black ----- - 19.0% ---- 645,290

Other Hisp -- 8.4% ---- 284,462

Vietnamese - 1.6%---- 55,489

Asian India --1.1% ---- 35,971

Chinese -- -- 1.0% ----- 34,673

Other Asian - 0.6% ---- 20,579

Filipino -- - --0.5% ---- 15,576

Pue. Rican -- 0.4% ----- 12,390

Korean -- --- 0.3% ---- 8,764

Cuban --- -- 0.2% ----- 8,206

Japanese ---- 0.1% ----- 3,574

Dallas County - 2,218,899

Race:

White - 58.4% ------ 1,294,769 - may/may not include Hispanic ethnicity

Black - 20.3% -------- 450,557 - may/may not include Hispanic ethnicity

Asian -- 4.0% --------- 88,369

Other - 17.3% --------- 385,204 - net: other, two or more, Native Am., Islander

Race/Ethnicity:

White only-- 44.3% ---- 983,317

Mexican --- 23.9% -----531,115

Black ----- - 20.8% ---- 462,609

Other Hisp -- 5.5% ---- 122,456

Asian India --1.1% ---- 23,752

Vietnamese - 1.0% ---- 21,355

Other Asian - 0.6% ---- 13,055

Chinese -- -- 0.5% ----- 12,094

Korean -- --- 0.4% ---- 9,303

Filipino -- - --0.3% ---- 6,617

Pue. Rican -- 0.2% ----- 5,534

Cuban --- -- 0.2% ----- 3,624

Japanese ---- 0.1% ----- 2,193

When considering any alien (Non-American) culture, an ethnic population less than a few thousand is very rarely represented as a sustained and progressive cultural presence. For example, the Japanese population in Dallas County can most likely be divided into two distinct groups: those fully integrated into the greater American Culture (born here, raised here yet ethnically 100% Japanese); and a settlement of Japanese immigrants which interact as an extended family rather than an extention of the Japanese culture. Simply put, there's not a large enough Japanese population in Dallas County to represent a 'remote location' of the Japanese culture.

To compare cultural varieties in Dallas and Harris Counties, it's accurate to say there is an across the board greater population in Harris County among the handful of transplant cultures, but it's inaccurate to say Harris County is more across the board more culturally or ethniclly diverse than Dallas County.

**Now the good part for Houston fans: The overall ethnic/cultural parity is not expected to continue in the future. Harris county welcomes a significantly greater immigrant population every year than any other county/parish in the South or Southwest (Florida excluded). Several of the pocket populations in Harris County are growing at a very fast rate primarily through immigration. Many groups which began as ethnic and cultural representation in the Harris County population are quickly becoming a sustained settlements of world cultures.

There's not too much differece between Yokum and Gonzales, but there is a huge difference between Yokum and Victoria.

I could not be more pleased with the potential of Harris to nudge into the category of American places in which the cultures from around the world thrive.

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Houston is in the range of new york and l.a when it comes down to international. Houston came in third when it come to international. #1 new york, #2 l.a., #3 houston, #4 chicago.

Houston is light years away behind New York and Los Angeles. The percentage of growth of the Houston ethnic population may make the #3 spot on a list of immigration, but the base numbers are not nearly enough to substantiate the claims you appear to be attempting.

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This whole "ethnic" population thing is highly over rated.

Not that there is anything wrong with being a diverse city, but I am still trying to see how this makes Houston "World Class".

Any major city could be "World Class", but its just simply a word of opion...

This whole "ethnic" population thing is whats keeping Houston "International" and connected (commercially, economically, and Immigration) with other countries around the world. It shows the world, we open our arms to new commers, and we have room for all kind' a folks round these parts! It makes it easier for people to connect in a "foreign" land, when there are alot of the same people, but blended in with the overall population.

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First, "International" must be defined.

Is it based on the number of international flights per day or number of passengers? Is it based on international appeal? Is it based on foreign consulates? Fortune 500 companies or business? Ethnic diversity? Excitement? # of residents? Languages spoken? Reputation? Multi-cultural art institutions?

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Can houston be compared to LA or NYC? No, but it doesn't have to measure up to those cities to be international. are we more diverse than dallas? Hell yes. anyone who lives here should know that. just go over to china town. without going into every detail let's close this dicussion and move on.

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First, "International" must be defined.

One part of the definition may consider the number of foreign cousulates - Houston has something like 80 ro 90 - that's a lot! Probably more than in the rest of the state combined.

Conventional wisdom says the ship channel is a primary driver of the presence of variety in Houston. Considering the probable continued cost effectiveness to distribute cargo from Asia through the Port of Houston, the marketing efforts to attract more Asian trade to the Port, as well as long range plans to expand crossings options at the Isthmus of Panama, Houston should have a near guarantee to be home to a wider cross section of world cultures - I'd tally that as a 'Yes' toward the International city label.

Nevertheless, the real definition probably lies in the impression of everyone not living in the USA. As folks in Europe, Asia or Africa want to check out a city in America, that's probably an International city. Really, I'm not too sure any city in Texas meets that benchmark. Trade may facilitate interaction, but until non-business interest in an area becomes a significant visitation factor among International travelers, well, maybe Texas cities should focus on becoming great American cities first.

Hosting an Olympic competition would be a good start.

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One part of the definition may consider the number of foreign cousulates - Houston has something like 80 ro 90 - that's a lot!  Probably more than in the rest of the state combined.

Conventional wisdom says the ship channel is a primary driver of the presence of variety in Houston.  Considering the probable continued cost effectiveness to distribute cargo from Asia through the Port of Houston, the marketing efforts to attract more Asian trade to the Port, as well as long range plans to expand crossings options at the Isthmus of Panama, Houston should have a near guarantee to be home to a wider cross section of world cultures - I'd tally that as a 'Yes' toward the International city label.

Nevertheless, the real definition probably lies in the impression of everyone not living in the USA.  As folks in Europe, Asia or Africa want to check out a city in America, that's probably an International city.  Really, I'm not too sure any city in Texas meets that benchmark.  Trade may facilitate interaction, but until non-business interest in an area becomes a significant visitation factor among International travelers, well, maybe Texas cities should focus on becoming great American cities first.

Hosting an Olympic competition would be a good start.

300,000,000 People watching Yao in China, is a start...

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According to what World Class, tier 1 and major international city then that is houston. When it comes to consulates/ embassy's, Houston comes in third behind New York City and D.C, with houston now having over 90. We are known through out the world as the Oil capital of the world, wich encompasses oil,gas, fossil fuel which powers every type of power that is needed. Where most of the OPEC nations are there is a representative from Houston there. The 1st city ever spoken outside of Earth and on another body was Houston as in "Houston the Eagle has landed. Most cities on this planet have a couple of medical offices in the same place, we have a hold region that is called the largest medical complex in the world (TMC) and guess what we still have medical complexes all over in other areas, memorial city, Northwest and Woodlands, just to name a few. We have worldclass Convention areas, with two of them being in the top 10, Reliant and GRB. When it comes to impact internationally we are number three, behind only New York and D.C ( because it's the Capital) with SF,LA, and Boston following behind. We have the largest port in the U.S in both import and export. Ethnicity rankning is already there with South of the border appeal, russian, the African west coast, South African, Arab as well as Euro and Canadian. Plus I can go on and on. WE HAVE NASA. I will come with the site later but it is said that our port along with the one in Galveston produces more money than any place else outside of the Federal reserve.

When it comes to World Class, Houston is right there with New York and Chicago Us and D.C. and we are in front of SF, Mia,Boston, Sea, and LA. With Atl and Dal behind them.

Oh yeah not hoasting the Olympics don't make you international, look at New York, Chicago and D.C. It does help though cause ATL Blew up after they hosted the Olympics.

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After having lived in Houston, New York, D.C, and Dallas, and visited Los Angeles quite frequently, I would have to say that Houston is nowhere near, and I mean NOWHERE near, being as international as New York, D.C, or Los Angeles for that matter. However it comes closer to Los Angeles. New York, 1st of all, is in a class by itself due to its history of being the city that welcomes immigrants. The Statue of Liberty is there. . . and we all have heard stories about lady liberty and her appeal as a beacon welcoming immigrants into our country. New York has well established communities of Dominicans, Cubans, Jews, Italians, Polish, Jamaicans, Russians, South Koreans, Indians, Greeks, Hatians, Ghanans, Nigerians, etc. All of these respective communities would easily dwarf their sister communities in Houston. What's more is that New Yorkers come in contact with all of these types of people on an everyday basis. . .so there is a greater tolerance and understanding of different cultures/ethnicities/languages. . . and most people are identified by their country as opposed to the way most Houstonians, or Texans for that matter, identify people according to the four basics. . . as either Black, White, Mexican or Asian.

Without going into unnecessary detail, D.C is the nation's capitol with many embassy's and communities from around the world, and it should be obvious why it is more international.

I would actually say that San Fransisco is more International than Los Angeles, but Los Angeles gets most of its international status from immigrants comming from the south pacific, Australia, and the SE Asian nations. Los Angeles just has a longer history than Houston of this type of immigration, and that's why Houston is behind LA.

Houston can take pride in the fact that it is probably more international than Dallas. However Dallas is making huge strides in this area, and I expect it will catch up soon.

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I was surprised to learn which US city has the largest population of Mexicans (or Mexican-Americans).

Chicago. I would have thought LA or Houston. Chicago, with its ethnic enclaves, seems more of the NYC than the LA model.

713 to 214 has a valid point about NYC, too - that it's not only multicultural, but that these cultures come into frequent contact with one another. People can live a fairly segregated existance in Houston which simply isn't possible in NYC.

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I disagree with 713-214. Houston has over 90 languages here. We don't only have blacks, mexicans, whites, or asians. We have the same types of cultures that new york has, but the only thing that new york has more is population, and of course they going to have more culture then any other city. But the same culture that new york and l.a. has, houston has also. Yes, houston is third behind new york and l.a.

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I disagree with 713-214. Houston has over 90 languages here. We don't only have blacks, mexicans, whites, or asians. We have the same types of cultures that new york has, but the only thing that new york has more is population, and of course they going to have more culture then any other city. But the same culture that new york and l.a. has, houston has also. Yes, houston is third behind new york and l.a.

You're funny, because you argue against your own points. :lol: But thank you for agreeing with me. . . sort of. :lol::lol::lol::rolleyes:

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According to what World Class, tier 1 and major international city then that is houston. When it comes to consulates/ embassy's, Houston comes in third behind New York City and D.C, with houston now having over 90. We are known through out the world as the Oil capital of the world, wich encompasses oil,gas, fossil fuel which powers every type of power that is needed.  Where most of the OPEC nations are there is a representative from Houston there. The 1st city ever spoken outside of Earth and on another body was Houston as in "Houston the Eagle has landed. Most cities on this planet have a couple of medical offices in the same place, we have a hold region that is called the largest medical complex in the world (TMC) and guess what we still have medical complexes all over in other areas, memorial city, Northwest and Woodlands, just to name a few. We have worldclass Convention areas, with two of them being in the top 10, Reliant and GRB. When it comes to impact internationally we are number three, behind only New York and D.C ( because it's the Capital) with SF,LA, and Boston following behind. We have the largest port in the U.S in both import and export. Ethnicity rankning is already there with South of the border appeal, russian, the African west coast, South African, Arab as well as Euro and Canadian. Plus I can go on and on. WE HAVE NASA. I will come with the site later but it is said that our port along with the one in Galveston produces more money than any place else outside of the Federal reserve.

When it comes to World Class, Houston is right there with New York and Chicago Us and D.C. and we are in front of SF, Mia,Boston, Sea, and LA.  With Atl and Dal behind them.

Oh yeah not hoasting the Olympics don't make you international, look at New York, Chicago and D.C.  It does help though cause ATL Blew up after they hosted the Olympics.

Tulsa, OK is known as the "Oil Capital of the World", we are known as the "Energy Capital of the World."

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After having lived in Houston, New York, D.C, and Dallas, and visited Los Angeles quite frequently, I would have to say that Houston is nowhere near, and I mean NOWHERE near, being as international as New York, D.C, or Los Angeles for that matter.  However it comes closer to Los Angeles.  New York, 1st of all, is in a class by itself due to its history of being the city that welcomes immigrants.  The Statue of Liberty is there. . . and we all have heard stories about lady liberty and her appeal as a beacon welcoming immigrants into our country.  New York has well established communities of Dominicans, Cubans, Jews, Italians, Polish, Jamaicans, Russians, South Koreans, Indians, Greeks, Hatians, Ghanans, Nigerians, etc.  All of these respective communities would easily dwarf their sister communities in Houston.  What's more is that New Yorkers come in contact with all of these types of people on an everyday basis. . .so there is a greater tolerance and understanding of different cultures/ethnicities/languages. . . and most people are identified by their country as opposed to the way most Houstonians, or Texans for that matter, identify people according to the four basics. . . as either Black, White, Mexican or Asian.

Without going into unnecessary detail, D.C is the nation's capitol with many embassy's and communities from around the world, and it should be obvious why it is more international.

I would actually say that San Fransisco is more International than Los Angeles, but Los Angeles gets most of its international status from immigrants comming from the south pacific, Australia, and the SE Asian nations.  Los Angeles just has a longer history than Houston of this type of immigration, and that's why Houston is behind LA.

Houston can take pride in the fact that it is probably more international than Dallas.  However Dallas is making huge strides in this area, and I expect it will catch up soon.

Having Lived in New York City, Houston, and Los Angeles, I would say Houston is before Los Angeles when it comes to International. But this is such a hard concept, because there are so many ways that a city is "International". Like # of immagrants, # of consulants, etc... Its a never ending war, and can never be settled. I think New York City, without a single doubt in my mind is #1 when it comes down to it. No questions asked. As for Chicago, not very much so, I would say its a tie between (for 2nd place) Los Angeles and Houston, or LA is #2, and were slightly catching up. Now, there is however a problem. Dallas... Its not where near all of the "International" statiscs you would like to use... as compared to Houston. :)

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I can stop this right now. I have a girlfriend that works for the government in d.c. and I told her about the new consul that houston has gotten. She reply "Oh yes, Houston is an international city along with new york and them." Then she went on saying, "New york and l.a. is really not booming like they use to. Alot of people don't cater to those cities like back then. All I hear at work is Houston this, and houston that. I would love to move to houston." She also reply on d.c. international, "D.C. is international, but not on that high degree. D.C. is mainly high political. Everywhere from D.C. to Maryland is highly political." We always decussing different stuff that I really don't wanna discuss on this forum.

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I can stop this right now. I have a girlfriend that works for the government in d.c. and I told her about the new consul that houston has gotten. She reply "Oh yes, Houston is an international city along with new york and them."

HA HA HA HA HA!!! :lol::lol::lol:

Well, why didn't you just say that before. I mean we could have ended this a long time ago if we had known that your girlfriend is THE AUTHORITY on which cities are international ones, and why they are considered international cities. [sarcasm] :D

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HA HA HA HA HA!!! :lol:   :lol:   :lol:

Well, why didn't you just say that before.  I mean we could have ended this a long time ago if we had known that your girlfriend is THE AUTHORITY on which cities are international ones, and why they are considered international cities.  [sarcasm] :D

His girlfriend is just as much as an Authority as you are...

"Mommy! The pots calling the kettle black again!"

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The Houston Pep Squad, well, they've got spunk!

Houston has many groups making great strides toward the establishment of ancestrial cultures, but it's too new. Many of the immigrants in Houston will be assimilated into American culture leaving just a faint mark on the Internatinal flavor of the metro.

Houston will eventually become a city with many cultural ties to other countries, but most of the claims here are a couple generations premature.

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But, Dallas has to potential to become as big of a melting pot as we are!

I dont think Dallas will ever "catch up" with Houston to be considered as much of a melting pot. The big airport in Dallas with a new international terminal might give the metroplex an immigration boost, but the big ship yard in Houston is a much stronger immigration magnet.

The two cities would do each other a favor if they could just get over it and officially combined efforts to attract more international business.

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Tulsa, OK is known as the "Oil Capital of the World", we are known as the "Energy Capital of the World."

That is not true, in other countries especially the OPEC nations we are called the Energy Capital of the world and the Oil capital, in fact Houston took 2 oil companies from Tulsa as well as having many on shore and off shore oil wells. Oil begats energy.

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His girlfriend is just as much as an Authority as you are...

"Mommy! The pots calling the kettle black again!"

1st of all. . .You should let other grown men speak for themselves.

secondarily. . . I never said that I am an authority on the subject. However, having lived in Houston, Dallas, New York, and D.C., I felt that I could offer a unique/educated perspective to the discussion. Can you say the same?

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  • 4 months later...

I am a former (but still PROUD) Houstonian who lives in Southern California.

Houston has achieved in less than 25 years what Los Angeles took almost 80 plus years to accomplish in terms of garnering a relative international population in an established way.

Sure, the bean count favors older LA...but the range of diversity in Houston almost matches what's in LA. L.A. has the Polynesian/Hawaiian stuff that Houston doesn't have, but that's OK.

In Houston, you've got Filipino, Colombian, Indonesian, Malaysian, Guatemalan, Peruvian, Korean, El Salvadoran, Lebanese, Thai, Ethiopian, Persian, Russian and etc. restaurants just like LA.

Plus Houston has Nigerian and Pakistani restaurants in spades, things which are more rare here even in SoCal. I love Pakistani food and you cannot find that here in San Diego! (I hear there is a small Pakistani plaza in Orange County somewhere, an hour plus from where I am.)

I think NY's status as "most international US city" is over-rated. (LA still holds that honor in my opinion.) I had a difficult time finding a Vietnamese pho place walking around Chinatown NY, and simply wound up eating at Cafe Sambuca in bordering Little Italy. I'm sure there's pho somewhere in Manhattan, but one finds pho noodle in Houston more easily whether in downtown or the SW or NW.

Just because people in NY see each other on the pedestrian streets doesn't mean they always get along...or think highly of each other. In H-town, folks of different stripes still come together in Kemah, downtown, Galleria waterfall, Sharpstown, Med Center and such even if they have to use automobiles to get there. Houston is rather known for being the big city where the ethnic tensions are less than in others. In pedestrian Chicago and NY, those ethnic enclaves cause people to be so proud of their own ethnicities that they look down on others. In Houston, there is quite less of that strongly identified "ethnic neighborhood." In Houston, sure there are strongly collected ethnic commercial areas but working middleclass people of different cultures/races are interspersed in those juxtaposed lovely ranch houses and apartments all over Alief, Sharpstown, West Chase and West Oaks. This is not to deny the impoverished Latino and African-American slums that exist in Houston however.

Considering that Houston is young and late-starting, it has done an impressive job of almost catching up to the more established cities like LA and NY. Let us not forget that.

I do consider Houston to be in that same class as LA and NY even if those two towns are still "ahead."

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Really, I'm not too sure any city in Texas meets that benchmark. Trade may facilitate interaction, but until non-business interest in an area becomes a significant visitation factor among International travelers, well, maybe Texas cities should focus on becoming great American cities first.

by tamtagon

Actually Houston more than meets that "benchmark." Internationality more than just visits Houston, it actually lives there. Houston is more than just "business."

The pan-Asian population, for example, increased by 79% from 1990 to 2000. Houston's ethnic diversity is impressive. You can find Asian goodies in NW Houston along Veteran's Memorial, in SW along Bellaire, Bissonnet and Beechnut, along Hillcroft...I mean c'mon.

By this standard, Orlando (and neighboring quarters, Kissimmee), which has a famous rodent that attracts millions of international visiters every year...is a "benchmark." I lived in Central Florida for a few years and quite frankly, Orlando is nothing compared to Dallas or Houston in terms of being great! Orlando is pretty much whitebread compared to those two great Texas cities.

I live in San Diego, but despite its diversity it carries on in a whitebread, countryclub way. In Houston, there is more pride in its diversity and does not seem to have that colonial vibe that still subtly exists here in San Diego.

According to Wikipedia, Houston and Dallas are already "3rd tier" international cities, on par with Amsterdam and the like. Lovely San Diego ("America's Finest City" as they say here) doesn't make the cut yet.

Why there are those who insist that Dallas and Houston are not "great American cities" is quite interesting.

I do get weary of this general, if not unfounded, prejudicial standard and condescension against Houston and Dallas just because they are in Texas. As if being in Texas somehow negates the awesome international populations, ethnic shops, excellent museums and arts, lively nightclub zones and the like which are easily found in those two cities.

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my 2 cents:

i find houston to be a very culturally diverse city. in recent years, i've lived in st. louis, and spent lots of time in manhattan, dallas, orlando, and denver. obviously houston doesn't touch nyc, but i find it to be a lot more diverse then the other cities i mentioned. i actually like denver a lot (except when it gets cold), but it's just not diverse enough for me. i have a friend who moved from LA 6 months ago and feels the same way, he hasn't had a decent thai meal since he got there and he's been looking.

when you go out in houston, you see all types of people together in the same place. we have all types of restaurants and all types of people that for the most part get along. i know a lot of cities have very diverse populations, but at least with the ones i mentioned they don't feel as integrated.

i'm not going to try and rank all these cities (i know i already kinda did), i just think houston's doing just fine.

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I do get weary of this general, if not unfounded, prejudicial standard and condescension against Houston and Dallas just because they are in Texas.  As if being in Texas somehow negates the awesome international populations, ethnic shops, excellent museums and arts, lively nightclub zones and the like which are easily found in those two cities.

i couldn't agree more. i get so much crap for living here, even from friends who have moved here. they see one truck commercial and it's over.

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Guest Professional Hornblower

I think the #1 criterion is "How many International House of Pancakes" are there?

Houston - 74

NYC - 62

LA - 48

Chicago - 19

Surprisingly, Jacksonville, Florida has 81...the most of any other North American city.

As can be seen by the number proof here, Houston is the second-most international city in North America.

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