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Was Sakowitz A Famous Store From Houston?


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And that company isn't very healthy.

There's Kaplan's Ben Hur on Yale, which dates to 1913, probably way before PR. There was a Kaplan's downtown in the 500 block of Travis in the 20s, but I don't know if it's the same.

I wouldn't be surprised is there's some other small department store in some older neighborhood, maybe out on the east side, that's still in business.

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H-town, This wouldn't be the first time that you have misinterpreted something that I written. I wasn't offended by your comments at all. I apparently wasn't aware that you had a "thing" about rich p

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Thank you for posting all the photos, it gives me warm fuzzies and I think about my parents. There was always one or two boxes under the Christmas tree for my mom that were from Joske's and Sakowitz. I do miss that whole era of Houston. I got my prom dress at the last big sale at Sakowitz on Post Oak. I agree with the member that said Dillard's ruined the flagship Joske's in SA!!! TOTALLY!!

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  • 5 weeks later...
The Confederate battle flag was probably flying in that photograph because of the centennial commemorations of the Civil War/War between the States.

That is a brillant deduction Kewpie, I think you might be right.

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  • 3 weeks later...

sakowitz furs is still around. Its in a small shop on post oak and westheimer. To bring it back would be a feat beacause of the galleria. Macys, and Neimans killed it. You'd also have to compete with the Houston dress shop: Tootsies, an institution. The money to bring it back would be astronomical! You'd probably have better luck in the woodlands and then opening a sattelite store up in River Oaks after the woodlands took off. Maybe even Frisco and Plano... (they're some of the fastest growing communities in the country right now)...

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sakowitz furs is still around. Its in a small shop on post oak and westheimer. To bring it back would be a feat beacause of the galleria. Macys, and Neimans killed it. You'd also have to compete with the Houston dress shop: Tootsies, an institution. The money to bring it back would be astronomical! You'd probably have better luck in the woodlands and then opening a sattelite store up in River Oaks after the woodlands took off. Maybe even Frisco and Plano... (they're some of the fastest growing communities in the country right now)...

Sakowitz Furs has nothing to do with Sakowitz Bros. It is owned by Jerry Gronauer.

Bobby Sakowitz drove Sakowitz Bros. into the ground after his father, Bernard passed away because he couldn't even think himself out of a paper bag.

His sister, Lynn Sakowitz Wyatt had the good sense to steer clear of her otherwise-occupied brother and stick with international celebrity dividing her time between her Houston home in River Oaks, NYC and her villa in France-all on the dime of her husband Oscar; recently charged with bribing Iraqi officials in a scheme to corrupt the United Nations oil-for-food program.

Dunno...maybe she should have stuck by Bobby...

B)

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  • 3 weeks later...
it is still a beautiful building blank wall or not it is very interesting kind like monument.

Yeah, I can kind of see what you mean [Foley's across the street] but Sakowitiz was not completely blank- walled. Check out the Main and Dallas street sides. I think I remember having lunch in one of those windows with my sisters and my mom a few times. Can't remember if it was on Main or Dallas...might have even been Fannin. Jeez, ya know? I'm like into my 50's-cut me a break :lol:

B)

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So shopping occupied ALL the levels in the building in downtown? How in the world did they convert it into parking? What a waste!

easy cowboy, this building was saved from the wrecking ball only because it was converted into a garage. Otherwise, it would have been torn down and a garage would have been built in its place in the 80's

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I wonder what was up with all the blank faced wall department stores going up in those days.

Air conditioning, my friend. A building without windows made a clear atatement that the building was air conditioned. I'm sure that not having windows allowed more efficient use of the interior as well, but, like Foley's, I believe, showing off air conditioning in the 50s was a big deal.

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I worked at Battlestein's one summer while I was in High School. Switched over to Foley's that fall, lots more business so we didn't stand around with nothing to do. They got bought out by Beall's I thought -- at least the one in Sharpstown Mall did.

This was back in the days when retail stores were closed on Sundays and only opened till 9 pm on Mondays & Thursdays. We used to stand around Mon & Thurs night with an average of about 4 customers a night. The ceiling in that store sort of looked like the underside of an egg carton, and we'd kill time by throwing some light weight object up to the ceiling to see if we could hit the high points.

It was that summer that Battlestein's FINALLY got electronic cash registers. Before that we had cash drawers and hand wrote tickets & figured in the tax manually. My sister had worked at Battlestein's a few years before that and they didn't even have cash drawers -- instead, they wrote up the ticket and sent that along with the customer's money or credit card to the cash office via a canister similar to what you see in drive-though banks. Isn't that funny!?

Thanks for letting me reminisce.

Back on topic, I also remember Sakowitz II on Nasa Road 1. I worked for IBM (for Nasa) for a semester in college so I used to drive out to Clear Lake every day, and I shopped at that Sakowitz II sometimes at lunch. It was a pretty small store with not much selection.

Battelsteins.jpg

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I did not think Palais Royal was originally from Houston. Seems like I aways sent their credit card payment somewhere out of state...

Sakowitz was a bit out of my family's price range, but we did go there occasionaly to look around. We did a lot of shopping at Joskey's. I too worked at Foley's in high school..and love the downtown location.

The thing that sticks out the most to me....in looking at those old pictures of the inside of Sakowitz is how glamorous the store was...and how much room there was. My major complaint about department stores now is that are overstocked with inventory. You cannot move between the racks of cloths.

I remember years ago it was such a treat to spend hours in a store and really enjoy shopping. Now days I rush in, hope I can find what I'm looking for and get out as fast as I can. Who wants to spend time in a store that feels like the merchandise is going to attack at any moment?

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I did not think Palais Royal was originally from Houston. Seems like I aways sent their credit card payment somewhere out of state...

Sakowitz was a bit out of my family's price range, but we did go there occasionaly to look around. We did a lot of shopping at Joskey's. I too worked at Foley's in high school..and love the downtown location.

The thing that sticks out the most to me....in looking at those old pictures of the inside of Sakowitz is how glamorous the store was...and how much room there was. My major complaint about department stores now is that are overstocked with inventory. You cannot move between the racks of cloths.

I remember years ago it was such a treat to spend hours in a store and really enjoy shopping. Now days I rush in, hope I can find what I'm looking for and get out as fast as I can. Who wants to spend time in a store that feels like the merchandise is going to attack at any moment?

Palais Royal is owned by Stage Stores but was started by the Margolis family in Houston. Their HQ is on Main. They also own Bealls.

I still buy clothes at 43rd because I can find nice quality men's clothes without feeling like I'm getting mauled.

B)

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Palais Royal is owned by Stage Stores but was started by the Margolis family in Houston. Their HQ is on Main. They also own Bealls.

I still buy clothes at 43rd because I can find nice quality men's clothes without feeling like I'm getting mauled.

B)

We need to put name stickers on so we recognize each other..seems we travel same circles often.

PR on 43rd is about the only Dept Store I go to anymore. But you have to admit, even they have way too many racks of cloths in such a small store. :rolleyes:

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We need to put name stickers on so we recognize each other..seems we travel same circles often.

PR on 43rd is about the only Dept Store I go to anymore. But you have to admit, even they have way too many racks of cloths in such a small store. :rolleyes:

I agree. It's harder for the women. The men's dept is right by the front door and isn't that large to begin with.

I'll be wearing this: B)

B)

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  • 4 months later...
Sakowitz moved from it's original location at 308 Main in 1918 to the Kiam Buildings located at 314-320 Main. The Kiam Buildings were built in 1893 and boasted the 1st electric elevator in Houston and the 3rd in the nation according to old news accounts. I've seen no references to elevators, either electric or otherwise, before this so, yes, Sakowitz had the first elevator in Houston, though it was 25 years old when they purchased the building. As recently as 10 years ago, the original car was still in the building.

I acknowledge that Music Hall {& Coliseum} were both built @ the same time but the strange thing is that it {Music Hall} is not recognized nor listed for the 1946-47 issue of Morrison's & Fourmy's Houston City Directory. The Coliseum is however. I have searched several catagories in classified section and white pages both w/same negative results. But I know it was there because in my youth I went by it {& old fire station 2 w/4 bays on the north side} many, many times coming in/out of the downtown area.

Danny Mac

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  • 2 weeks later...

I still have my parents' original Sakowitz card. It is made of actual metal, not plastic.

I remember the store fondly. They cut the sandwiches into the shapes of animals for the kids eating in their cafeteria. I had my mom buy an animal shaped cookie cutter so I could have these at home.

I remember a man rolling cigars in the men's department during Christmas one year. I think it had something to do with Cuban cigars.

Edited by lilyheights
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  • 2 months later...
Sakowitz moved from it's original location at 308 Main in 1918 to the Kiam Buildings located at 314-320 Main. The Kiam Buildings were built in 1893 and boasted the 1st electric elevator in Houston and the 3rd in the nation according to old news accounts. I've seen no references to elevators, either electric or otherwise, before this so, yes, Sakowitz had the first elevator in Houston, though it was 25 years old when they purchased the building. As recently as 10 years ago, the original car was still in the building.

Sakowitz and Levitz show how sucessful Jewish people are. I wonder if they were related? Are any of their decendants still living?

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I remember when they closed their downtown store. I worked contract to help move the phone system from the downtown to the Galeria store. I had to crawl across through the ceiling of the Galeria store to punch holes and drop phone lines down to cashiers stations below. Man that was scary! The ceiling was made of stucco and only two feet high. There were fire water lines, AC vents, and VERY DARK. All the time knowing if I fell through it was 30 feet to the floor below.

We still have a set of silver spoons and crystal glasses with "S" inscribed on them.

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Sakowitz and Levitz show how sucessful Jewish people are. I wonder if they were related? Are any of their decendants still living?

The two Sakowitz children are alive and well. Robert Sakowitz and his sister, Lynn Wyatt, are both active in the social scene. Lynn is married to Oscar Wyatt who founded Coastal Corp. He has been charged with paying illegal kickbacks to Iraqi officials as part of a scheme to circumvent the United Nation's oil-for-food program in 2001.

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The two Sakowitz children are alive and well. Robert Sakowitz and his sister, Lynn Wyatt, are both active in the social scene. Lynn is married to Oscar Wyatt who founded Coastal Corp. He has been charged with paying illegal kickbacks to Iraqi officials as part of a scheme to circumvent the United Nation's oil-for-food program in 2001.

Mr. Wyatt sounds like a "good ol' boy."

I remember when they closed their downtown store. I worked contract to help move the phone system from the downtown to the Galeria store. I had to crawl across through the ceiling of the Galeria store to punch holes and drop phone lines down to cashiers stations below. Man that was scary! The ceiling was made of stucco and only two feet high. There were fire water lines, AC vents, and VERY DARK. All the time knowing if I fell through it was 30 feet to the floor below.

We still have a set of silver spoons and crystal glasses with "S" inscribed on them.

I once worked for a private telecommunications company installing phone systems in businesses. When a business closed down and relocated, we just threw away the phone system and installed a new system in the company's new location. We were told that it would cost more to load up, transport, and re-install the old phone system than it would to simply re-install a new and updated system. I guess it was different back when you did it.

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  • 1 month later...

Sakowitz was definitely a local competitor to Neimans. I'm a native houstonian, born in 1976, and I remember my mom taking me to the old downtown store and the Post Oak store to buy clothes (mostly the stuff we wore to the theatre, church, our "Sunday" clothes), and we would eat lunch at the restaurants in the stores. They had great luncheon restaurants. I remember they would bring baskets full of orange bread and cheese straws (homemade) to the table when we sat down, and for kids they had pb&j and other sandwiches cookie-cut into the shape of animals.

I also remember a smaller Sakowitz closer to our house in the NW suburbs, on 1960 and Champions Forest - It's now a Sun and Ski Sports - the only former sakowitz building I know of to be still standing.

I remember going to the Post Oak Store when it was selling everything, even to racks, to close. We bought some furniture that is still in my parents' house.

I miss Sakowitz, it was a great store - along with Specialty Foods store Jamail's on SW corner of Kirby and Alabama.

There is an interesting book on the history of Sakowitz and the family feud that brought it down, called "Blood Rich: When Oil Billions, High Fashion, and Royal Intimacies are Not Enough" by Jane Wolf. It's out of print, but I picked it up used on Amazon for 40 cents.

Another old-school Houston clothing store, but still in business: Harold's in the Heights.

Edited by Reefmonkey
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I still have wooden hangers with the Sakowitz stamp on them. Very reliable hangers compared to what we get now!

I worked at Sakowitz in Town & Country from 1967 to 1972. We didn't give out the plastic hangars with the clothes. We took small wooden hangars and wrapped them in tissue paper to give to customers. If we were putting clothes in a box or bag, we also wrapped them in tissue and put a Sakowitz sticker on the tissue to hold it closed.

On nights when it wasn't busy (most nights) we would spend the time wrapping hangars.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Is it PC around here to dredge up old threads? I really don't care, just being new girl polite.

SAKOWITZ! I have read all the posts and find it amazing no one mentioned something extremely impressive about their practices. From the 1950's through the 1970's we shopped mainly in the downtown store. The ambiance was glorious, relaxing and it was a joy to wander and examine the exotic merchandise.

But, the most fun was every Autumn they held a major foreign focus 2 week long exhibition. When my daughter was young in the mid '70's and Germany was the selected country, one of the participatory displays was a real, authentic Gutenberg Press. It was hands on and an attendant assisted in explaining it thoroughly, then letting the customer print their own parchment from an ancient plate. There would be cultural displays, foods to sample, antique and modern products to browse and some to buy. I cannot recreate what a delightful learning and shopping experience it was. British Fortnight was another we particularly enjoyed.

On the fun side, when my little girl was less than a year old, in 1967, I braved all and took her downtown and we lunched in the Sakowitz restaurant. She really hadn't been out much beyond the grocery store and such and was a little overwhelmed by the big room full of people. When our middle-aged, black (African-American) waiter approached the table, she beamed and let loose at high volume, "Da-Da!" The crowd of River Oaks Dowagers were not amused, more like shock and awe. I realized she was simply identifying male person with male person. She didn't know any men other than her father. The poor waiter was as chagrined as the luncheon guests.

The rivalry between Neiman-Marcus and Sakowitz was very real. There was a story going around, probably apochryphal, of the snobbery between the staff of each venue. An old, seedy, country couple come to town. They are truly pathetic looking, dressed in practically flour sack garments. The old man was clutching a greasy brown paper bag. First they venture into Sakowitz and find their way to the Fur Department. The gap-toothed old man informs the clerk he wants to see mink coats for his wife. Whereupon they are unceremoniously escorted from the store. They walk across the street to Neiman's and are treated like royalty, as were all customers (to which I can attest). After some time of viewing the models parade various coats, they pick out a lovely, sky-high expensive, full length sable for the little woman. The man hands over the paper bag and says, take the price out of that. Surely enough it is stuffed with thousands of dollars. But wait, there's more! Departing Neiman's, they trudge back to Sakowitz with the wife wearing her new coat and present the fait accompli. And that, as legend held, was the day Sakowitz employees were re-educated in the ways of Texas consumer relations. Funny, yes, but not without some truth. Oil was springing forth like water and many dirt poor farmers were suddenly unlikely nouveau riche.

One last tidbit. When my late mother-in-law was widowed in her 50's, having never worked but needing a job desperately, Sakowitz hired her and trained her to be a punch card operator in the downtown office. When she retired, they presented her with a beautifully flower engraved, solid gold bracelet. She always called the big bosses Mr. Tobias and Mr. Bernard. Old Houston families had style and grace.

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Under the "Daddy, what was Sakowitz like?" category, I can offer the following.

(it seems that I cannot use the %7Boption%7D tag to post an image, so please click away at the links)

the links don't work. :(

i have fancy some shirts from there that i still wear to work!

Edited by torvald
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Is it PC around here to dredge up old threads? I really don't care, just being new girl polite.

SAKOWITZ! I have read all the posts and find it amazing no one mentioned something extremely impressive about their practices. From the 1950's through the 1970's we shopped mainly in the downtown store. The ambiance was glorious, relaxing and it was a joy to wander and examine the exotic merchandise.

But, the most fun was every Autumn they held a major foreign focus 2 week long exhibition. When my daughter was young in the mid '70's and Germany was the selected country, one of the participatory displays was a real, authentic Gutenberg Press. It was hands on and an attendant assisted in explaining it thoroughly, then letting the customer print their own parchment from an ancient plate. There would be cultural displays, foods to sample, antique and modern products to browse and some to buy. I cannot recreate what a delightful learning and shopping experience it was. British Fortnight was another we particularly enjoyed.

On the fun side, when my little girl was less than a year old, in 1967, I braved all and took her downtown and we lunched in the Sakowitz restaurant. She really hadn't been out much beyond the grocery store and such and was a little overwhelmed by the big room full of people. When our middle-aged, black (African-American) waiter approached the table, she beamed and let loose at high volume, "Da-Da!" The crowd of River Oaks Dowagers were not amused, more like shock and awe. I realized she was simply identifying male person with male person. She didn't know any men other than her father. The poor waiter was as chagrined as the luncheon guests.

The rivalry between Neiman-Marcus and Sakowitz was very real. There was a story going around, probably apochryphal, of the snobbery between the staff of each venue. An old, seedy, country couple come to town. They are truly pathetic looking, dressed in practically flour sack garments. The old man was clutching a greasy brown paper bag. First they venture into Sakowitz and find their way to the Fur Department. The gap-toothed old man informs the clerk he wants to see mink coats for his wife. Whereupon they are unceremoniously escorted from the store. They walk across the street to Neiman's and are treated like royalty, as were all customers (to which I can attest). After some time of viewing the models parade various coats, they pick out a lovely, sky-high expensive, full length sable for the little woman. The man hands over the paper bag and says, take the price out of that. Surely enough it is stuffed with thousands of dollars. But wait, there's more! Departing Neiman's, they trudge back to Sakowitz with the wife wearing her new coat and present the fait accompli. And that, as legend held, was the day Sakowitz employees were re-educated in the ways of Texas consumer relations. Funny, yes, but not without some truth. Oil was springing forth like water and many dirt poor farmers were suddenly unlikely nouveau riche.

One last tidbit. When my late mother-in-law was widowed in her 50's, having never worked but needing a job desperately, Sakowitz hired her and trained her to be a punch card operator in the downtown office. When she retired, they presented her with a beautifully flower engraved, solid gold bracelet. She always called the big bosses Mr. Tobias and Mr. Bernard. Old Houston families had style and grace.

For a time in the 1960's, I worked in the advertising department at Sakowitz. I cannot recall that Sakowitz ever had an annual two-week promotion featuring the goods and products of a foreign country. If they did, it was a short-lived copycat reaction to their perceived competition. Actually, Neiman's was famous for having annual "Fortnights" which were fabulous presentations of merchandise, food, customs, etc., from a different country each year. Their color newspaper ads, particularly those from the Dallas papers, were true works of art.

As far as snobby treatment of customers, I often experience it at Saks and Neimans, except in the cosmetics department where the sales staff literally leap at one from behind the counters in a effort to sell their overpriced, overhyped merchandise. Currently, I find the best customer service in an upscale store is at Nordstrom.

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If I remember correctly, the Sakowitz at Champions Village had Sakowitz II on the sign. Some sort of "junior version" of their bigger stores. The 1960 area wasn't yet developed enough to support a full size store apparently. There was also a Leopold Price & Rolle (sp?) in the center and Wilson's where the Stein-Mart is now. Back then I thought I was some kind of fancy with my Sakowitz velour shirts. Thank God there is no surviving photographic evidence of that episode.....

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  • 4 weeks later...
If I remember correctly, the Sakowitz at Champions Village had Sakowitz II on the sign. Some sort of "junior version" of their bigger stores. The 1960 area wasn't yet developed enough to support a full size store apparently. There was also a Leopold Price & Rolle (sp?) in the center and Wilson's where the Stein-Mart is now. Back then I thought I was some kind of fancy with my Sakowitz velour shirts. Thank God there is no surviving photographic evidence of that episode.....

Wow! What wonderful memories you have all provided me. I am a native Houstonian (such a rare breed) and grew up shopping Downtown Sakowitz and Gulfgate Sakowitz the two most fashionable stores at that time. I remember when they built the new Post Oak store. Truly enjoyed your memories of Battlestein's, Joske's, Leopold, Price & Rolle (sp is ok). I loved Sakowitz so much that in college I majored in business to become a buyer for Sakowitz. I started the executive training program while working at the Gulfgate store as a college student.

Back then, I am 55, we would never have shopped at Foley's or Palais Royal except for everyday clothes.

Times do change.

Besselman Collector

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  • 6 months later...
Well, let's consider it was 1963, no strong civil rights movement yet. Looking at the time of year these pictures were taken, if it is indeed 1963, it is well before November, and Kennedy is still president. Civil rights movement is just beginning to heat up. There is one astonishing factor though, I believe the Sakowitz family is Jewish, why they would fly that flag is beyond me. I guess they knew their customer base. LOL ! :blink::mellow::D

To be historically accurate, 1963 was actually at the height of the civil rights movement. That was the year of Martin Luther King's "I Have A Dream" speech during the March on Washington, the year when the 4 little girls were killed in that bombing of a Birmingham church, and the year when George Wallace made his famous stand on the steps of the University of Alabama asserting his support of segregation.

Leading up to that year, the Brown vs. Board of Education Supreme Court decision was in 1954, Rosa Parks had her bus incident in 1955, the "Little Rock Nine" entered school in 1957, and the first lunch-counter sit-in protest in Greensboro, North Carolina was in 1960.

The flying of the Confederate battle flag in the South was not exactly meaningless at that time. Indeed, Georgia added that Confederate symbol to its state flag in 1956, partly as a reaction what was happening nationally, even though the symbol was not part of its state flag before then:

http://www.sos.state.ga.us/museum/html/geo...c_1920_1956.htm

http://www.sos.state.ga.us/museum/html/geo..._since_1956.htm

I agree that the Sakowitz store probably was primarily playing up to their customer base at the time....but flying that flag in 1963 was a strong statement, nonetheless.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Do anyone know where these early mostly Jewish merchants lived during the heyday of their stores? A friend of mine is certain they were all segregated into the Riverside area along North and South Macgregor, and that family members of the Sakowitz, Battlesteins and even the Weingarten family still have mansions in this area, all because members of their religion were not permitted in River Oaks no matter how rich they were!. Any one know if this is true or not true?

[ quote name=DMac' date='Thursday, April 27th, 2006 @ 11:25am' post='83256]

I acknowledge that Music Hall {& Coliseum} were both built @ the same time but the strange thing is that it {Music Hall} is not recognized nor listed for the 1946-47 issue of Morrison's & Fourmy's Houston City Directory. The Coliseum is however. I have searched several catagories in classified section and white pages both w/same negative results. But I know it was there because in my youth I went by it {& old fire station 2 w/4 bays on the north side} many, many times coming in/out of the downtown area.

Danny Mac

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Do anyone know where these early mostly Jewish merchants lived during the heyday of their stores? A friend of mine is certain they were all segregated into the Riverside area along North and South Macgregor, and that family members of the Sakowitz, Battlesteins and even the Weingarten family still have mansions in this area, all because members of their religion were not permitted in River Oaks no matter how rich they were!. Any one know if this is true or not true?

[

true they lived there. i just remember robert sakowitz on river oaks blvd but i think he lost the house.

Edited by musicman
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...and that family members of the Sakowitz, Battlesteins and even the Weingarten family still have mansions in this area...

The Weingarten's and Sakowitz's did live on S. MacGregor long ago. I doubt the families still own any property there now. The Battelstein's lived across the street from an old school friend of mine, in the 40's -50's, in a neighborhood just southwest of the Greenbriar and S. Main intersection.

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Do anyone know where these early mostly Jewish merchants lived during the heyday of their stores? A friend of mine is certain they were all segregated into the Riverside area along North and South Macgregor, and that family members of the Sakowitz, Battlesteins and even the Weingarten family still have mansions in this area, all because members of their religion were not permitted in River Oaks no matter how rich they were!. Any one know if this is true or not true?

I have pretty good information indicating that the Sakowitz family lived on the 3500 block of North McGregor Drive during the 1950s/60s. I have no idea whether any family members are still there, or whether they still own that home.

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From the 1966 Cole's Directory:

Bernard Sakowitz

Robert T. Sakowitz

3533 Mac Gregor Way North

(About this time, I believe the house was demolished and apartments built on the site. According to the movie, This Is Our Home, It Is Not For Sale, the senior Sakowitz couple moved to a high-rise apartment near Tanglewood.)

Bernard Weingarten

4000 Mac Gregor Way South

Edited by SpaceAge
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  • 1 month later...
The two Sakowitz children are alive and well. Robert Sakowitz and his sister, Lynn Wyatt, are both active in the social scene. Lynn is married to Oscar Wyatt who founded Coastal Corp. He has been charged with paying illegal kickbacks to Iraqi officials as part of a scheme to circumvent the United Nation's oil-for-food program in 2001.

On page A18 in today's Houston Chronicle there's an ad where Sakowitz Furs will store women's fur coats for the summer months in their "state of the art, humidity controlled, COLD storage vaults, out of harm's way." Are any of you going to take advantage of this service?

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On page A18 in today's Houston Chronicle there's an ad where Sakowitz Furs will store women's fur coats for the summer months in their "state of the art, humidity controlled, COLD storage vaults, out of harm's way." Are any of you going to take advantage of this service?

I doubt there are many "ladies who lunch" on this forum, but you never know! :P

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On page A18 in today's Houston Chronicle there's an ad where Sakowitz Furs will store women's fur coats for the summer months in their "state of the art, humidity controlled, COLD storage vaults, out of harm's way." Are any of you going to take advantage of this service?

northbeaumont,

Just curious... Were you formerly Ashikaga?

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I love that this thread has been resurrected. As most know I tend to be nostalgic.

I am surprised by the number of people on this site that shopped at Sakowitz. Maybe we were poorer than I thought. We did shop at Joskey

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