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Anyone know the name of the store that used to reside on Southmore and Strawberry? Across from fingers? My mom recalls working a lubys and going to buy peppers when the delivary was late. It later turned into a Wal-Greens Which i assumed moved from Pasadena Town Square. Walgreens moved down the street to Burke and southmore but the building is still there. Also anyone know what the deal is with the old foodlion on Strawberry and cherrybrook? Looks like Sellers Bros owns it.

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Anyone know the name of the store that used to reside on Southmore and Strawberry? Across from fingers? My mom recalls working a lubys and going to buy peppers when the delivary was late. It later turned into a Wal-Greens Which i assumed moved from Pasadena Town Square. Walgreens moved down the street to Burke and southmore but the building is still there. Also anyone know what the deal is with the old foodlion on Strawberry and cherrybrook? Looks like Sellers Bros owns it.

this building?

2607PasadenaTXpic.jpg

sorry i don't know what grocery it was but it was built in 1960 according to HCAD and it did list one of the owners as Super Duper Foods in the 80's.

http://www.hcad.org/records/details.asp?ta...t=0321070200027

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The 1969 cross reference directory shows 1201 "Strawberry Belt" as "Strawberry Road Minimax."

473-5503

I bet they called the shopping carts "buggies" there.

I remember my mother simply calling them "baskets." She bought groceries from Weingarten's in the then-Gulfgate Shopping City. When I passed by there back in 1995, the name of it was McFrugal's. Someone on the forum said that it's now an H.E.B.

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  • 8 months later...
Totally- it was a Minimax up until the late 80's or 90's.

I remember a Minimax in Nederland, just south of Beaumont. It's now a public library. I don't think any of them are around anymore. I found a wesite called Grocerteria.com which lists old grocery stores. They gave me some information about a store that I went to when I was a kid called Weingarten's.

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They gave me some information about a store that I went to when I was a kid called Weingarten's.

We had a Weingarten's with, if I recall right, a TG&Y next to it. There were a few Weingartens around town. But then the Weingartens chose to focus on their real estate business. Such as, these days, what to do about the River Oaks Theater and Shopping Center. The company has a long Houston history.

I think we had a Minimax, too (this was in Clear Lake). Though I think the Minimax might have come in the 80's. It seems like it was around for at least 5+ years.

alabama81941.jpg

Edited by tmariar
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We had a Weingarten's with, if I recall right, a TG&Y next to it. There were a few Weingartens around town. But then the Weingartens chose to focus on their real estate business. Such as, these days, what to do about the River Oaks Theater and Shopping Center. The company has a long Houston history.

I think we had a Minimax, too. This was all down in Clear Lake, in the 70's...

alabama81941.jpg

Yes, there was also a T.G.&Y store next door to the Weingarten's that I went to as a kid in Port Arthur. Right next door to the T.G.&Y was the Big Bonus Trading Stamp Redemption Center, which were the brand of trading stamps that Weingarten's had. Next to it was a Weiner's clothing store. I don't think there's any more of those in this whole area. Only you would know if there have ever been any Weiner's in Houston.

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Next to it was a Weiner's clothing store. I don't think there's any more of those in this whole area. Only you would know if there have ever been any Weiner's in Houston.

The others will know better re Houston proper - there was one in Clear Lake. That was likely more Weingarten's era (70's) than Minimax era (80's). I just remember being a little kid and giggling at the name.

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Guest Marty
The others will know better re Houston proper - there was one in Clear Lake. That was likely more Weingarten's era (70's) than Minimax era (80's). I just remember being a little kid and giggling at the name.

There was a Minimax next to Super X drug store's address at 190 Town & Country Village in my 1969 Post newspaper.

Edited by Marty
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The others will know better re Houston proper - there was one in Clear Lake. That was likely more Weingarten's era (70's) than Minimax era (80's). I just remember being a little kid and giggling at the name.

There used to be a Weiner's anchoring one end of the strip center at I-45 and W. Mount Houston (before it was more commonly known as SH249). It was there into the 70s, and possibly the early 80s - can't remember exactly when it closed.

Next to that Weiner's, there was a TG&Y, and next to the TG&Y was a Piggly Wiggly. Dugan's Drugs anchored the other end of the center until they were bought out by Eckerd's sometime in the early 70s. Dugan's had an actual formica-topped lunch counter with stools and a soda fountain, a tube tester (remember those?) right by the cashier, and a fixture that filled every kid with anticipation: a spinning comics rack.

That Piggly Wiggly is the first supermarket I can ever remember going to as a kid - the only other place like it that I can remember from when I was very young is the A&P that used to be in Northtown Plaza at 45 & Tidwell.

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There used to be a Weiner's anchoring one end of the strip center at I-45 and W. Mount Houston (before it was more commonly known as SH249). It was there into the 70s, and possibly the early 80s - can't remember exactly when it closed.

Next to that Weiner's, there was a TG&Y, and next to the TG&Y was a Piggly Wiggly. Dugan's Drugs anchored the other end of the center until they were bought out by Eckerd's sometime in the early 70s. Dugan's had an actual formica-topped lunch counter with stools and a soda fountain, a tube tester (remember those?) right by the cashier, and a fixture that filled every kid with anticipation: a spinning comics rack.

That Piggly Wiggly is the first supermarket I can ever remember going to as a kid - the only other place like it that I can remember from when I was very young is the A&P that used to be in Northtown Plaza at 45 & Tidwell.

I don't want to sound like I'm stupid, but what's a "tube tester."?

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I don't want to sound like I'm stupid, but what's a "tube tester."?

They were machines that allowed you to test vacuum tubes to determine if they had gone bad or not. Back in the days before the internals of all TVs and radios were completely taken over by printed circuit boards and surface mount chipsets, they had vacuum tubes. Lots of places had these standalone tube testers, so when you suspected one or more of the tubes in your set was starting to go bad, you'd pull them and tote them down to a store that had a tube tester, determine if you had a bad tube, and if so, you could purchase a replacement right there. They were usually in large standup cabinets, like this:

tubechkr1.JPG

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There used to be a Weiner's anchoring one end of the strip center at I-45 and W. Mount Houston (before it was more commonly known as SH249). It was there into the 70s, and possibly the early 80s - can't remember exactly when it closed.

Next to that Weiner's, there was a TG&Y, and next to the TG&Y was a Piggly Wiggly. Dugan's Drugs anchored the other end of the center until they were bought out by Eckerd's sometime in the early 70s. Dugan's had an actual formica-topped lunch counter with stools and a soda fountain, a tube tester (remember those?) right by the cashier, and a fixture that filled every kid with anticipation: a spinning comics rack.

That Piggly Wiggly is the first supermarket I can ever remember going to as a kid - the only other place like it that I can remember from when I was very young is the A&P that used to be in Northtown Plaza at 45 & Tidwell.

The Weiner's closed after Allison in 2001. Being the closest store near Halls Bayou, it was severely damaged in the flood. The store had gotten pretty seedy anyway.

Actually, the Weiner's wasn't part of the original shopping center, which was built in 1969. It was added on two years later in 1971. If you go to the shopping center, you can clearly see a differention in the bricks from the rest. Considering the deteriorating condition of the neighborhood, you may not want to do that and just take my word. LOL!

Eckerds bought out Mading-Dugan in 1971. TG&Y was bought out by McCrory's sometime in the 1980s. You may remember how the TG&Y had a mini-post office in the back. Rice took over the Piggly Wiggly space in 1973. Sometime in the mid 1980s, Rice sold the lease to mom and pop grocery store called Price Fighter. I worked at the Kroger across the freeway at that time and the guy who started Price Fighter was actually a customer who would frequently come through my line. I think he wanted me to come to work there because the last time he came to my checkstand, he told me he was opening a store and wondered how much made. Apparently he was just paying minimum wage, and it went no further. Our manager used to send spies there all the time to see what their prices were.

Edited by Firebird65
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The Weiner's closed after Allison in 2001. Being the closest store near Halls Bayou, it was severely damaged in the flood. The store had gotten pretty seedy anyway.

Actually, the Weiner's wasn't part of the original shopping center, which was built in 1969. It was added on two years later in 1971. If you go to the shopping center, you can clearly see a differention in the bricks from the rest. Considering the deteriorating condition of the neighborhood, you may not want to do that and just take my word. LOL!

Eckerds bought out Mading-Dugan in 1971. TG&Y was bought out by McCrory's sometime in the 1980s. You may remember how the TG&Y had a mini-post office in the back. Rice took over the Piggly Wiggly space in 1973. Sometime in the mid 1980s, Rice sold the lease to mom and pop grocery store called Price Fighter. I worked at the Kroger across the freeway at that time and the guy who started Price Fighter was actually a customer who would frequently come through my line. I think he wanted me to come to work there because the last time he came to my checkstand, he told me he was opening a store and wondered how much made. Apparently he was just paying minimum wage, and it went no further. Our manager used to send spies there all the time to see what their prices were.

I graduated from high school in Beaumont, which is 84 miles east of Houston. When I was a kid, my parents and I would take a weekend drive to Houston. I remember seeing signs of Piggly Wiggly that said "Open Sunday." You can tell that was back when the "blue laws" were in force."

I remember over here in the Gateway Shopping Center many years ago was a Henke & Pillot supermarket. I also remember seeing at least one in Houston on one of those weekend trips. Its store brand name was called Kroger, and later the chain simply changed its name to that. Do any of you remember Henke & Pillot?

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They were machines that allowed you to test vacuum tubes to determine if they had gone bad or not. Back in the days before the internals of all TVs and radios were completely taken over by printed circuit boards and surface mount chipsets, they had vacuum tubes. Lots of places had these standalone tube testers, so when you suspected one or more of the tubes in your set was starting to go bad, you'd pull them and tote them down to a store that had a tube tester, determine if you had a bad tube, and if so, you could purchase a replacement right there. They were usually in large standup cabinets, like this:

tubechkr1.JPG

You just triggered my memory! Now I remember those tube testers. It makes me also remember us taking our TV to a repair shop whenever it broke and we had nothing to watch until the repair shop called and told us that our TV was ready.

Things have certainly changed. We didn't get our first color TV until I was 13. Now, black and white TVs are almost obsolete. The only new ones I've seen are those 5-inch battery-operated portables. As you said about circuit boards replacing tubes, those have made it to where when your TV breaks down for even the first time, you would simply go ahead and throw it away. The price of TVs are now so low that you would simply go out and buy a new one. To me, I think that there are very few, if any, TV repair shops around anymore. The circuit board eliminated TV repair shops, and the jobs of the people who repaired them. You can buy a new TV for a lot less than it would cost to repair it (that is, if there were someone around who knew how to repair it).

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The Weiner's closed after Allison in 2001. Being the closest store near Halls Bayou, it was severely damaged in the flood. The store had gotten pretty seedy anyway.

Actually, the Weiner's wasn't part of the original shopping center, which was built in 1969. It was added on two years later in 1971. If you go to the shopping center, you can clearly see a differention in the bricks from the rest. Considering the deteriorating condition of the neighborhood, you may not want to do that and just take my word. LOL!

I'll have to check that out the next time I'm over there - my parents still live nearby, so I drive by that shopping center almost every time I visit them. Halls Bayou really needs to be re-engineered to address the chronic flooding problems in that area, but I'm not optimistic that'll happen any time soon - my dad has talked to the Flood Control District about this before, and their response has been that they're aware of the issues there, but so far it hasn't gone any farther than that. A good start would be cleaning all the trash out of the bayou - if you park in the shopping center parking lot and look around the section of the bayou that runs right by it, it's obvious that a lot of people have used it as their personal dumping ground.

Checking the Flood Control District's website, it appears that there are plans afoot for some modifications to Halls Bayou, but it doesn't look like the major changes will extend past Veterans Memorial, which may not help the areas closer to I-45 much:

Halls Bayou

Eckerds bought out Mading-Dugan in 1971. TG&Y was bought out by McCrory's sometime in the 1980s. You may remember how the TG&Y had a mini-post office in the back. Rice took over the Piggly Wiggly space in 1973. Sometime in the mid 1980s, Rice sold the lease to mom and pop grocery store called Price Fighter. I worked at the Kroger across the freeway at that time and the guy who started Price Fighter was actually a customer who would frequently come through my line. I think he wanted me to come to work there because the last time he came to my checkstand, he told me he was opening a store and wondered how much made. Apparently he was just paying minimum wage, and it went no further. Our manager used to send spies there all the time to see what their prices were.

I completely forgot about the Rice Food Market that was there after Piggly Wiggly. Never realized there was "grocery espionage" going on. My first job was at the Gerland's at 249 and Veterans Memorial (it was probably still Stuebner-Airline then) - I lied about my age on the application, because you had to be 16 to work there, and I was only 15. After working there for a while, I never wanted to sack groceries again for as long as I lived. :P

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I graduated from high school in Beaumont, which is 84 miles east of Houston. When I was a kid, my parents and I would take a weekend drive to Houston. I remember seeing signs of Piggly Wiggly that said "Open Sunday." You can tell that was back when the "blue laws" were in force."

I remember over here in the Gateway Shopping Center many years ago was a Henke & Pillot supermarket. I also remember seeing at least one in Houston on one of those weekend trips. Its store brand name was called Kroger, and later the chain simply changed its name to that. Do any of you remember Henke & Pillot?

I remember going to Henke & Pillot in the early 50's as a small boy........

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I graduated from high school in Beaumont, which is 84 miles east of Houston. When I was a kid, my parents and I would take a weekend drive to Houston. I remember seeing signs of Piggly Wiggly that said "Open Sunday." You can tell that was back when the "blue laws" were in force."

I remember over here in the Gateway Shopping Center many years ago was a Henke & Pillot supermarket. I also remember seeing at least one in Houston on one of those weekend trips. Its store brand name was called Kroger, and later the chain simply changed its name to that. Do any of you remember Henke & Pillot?

My grandma used to shop at the Henke in the eastend on the corner of Harrisburg and Wayside across the street from Sears.

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Henke's was started in 1872 by a Mr. Henke and a Mr. Pillot; it became Houston's first grocery store chain, I think. I believe it was bought in the mid 50s by Kroger. Pillot was pronounced with a long e sound for the i and our name for it as kids was Drinkwater Pillot.

tubechkr1.JPG

I wish I had a nickel for everytime I had to pull all the tubes out of my Zenith Trans-Oceanic, put them in a paper bag and pedal down to the 7-11 to test them. Before these do it yourself things became available, the only option was to leave your set at a radio repair shop and then wait a week or two for them to get around to testing them and charging you for the labor.

Is this 'our' Minimax chain??? Time Magazine article from 1965: http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/...,833669,00.html I always thought it was Houston based.

Here's a pic of some Minimax products from 1937 from the Bob Bailey collection at UT:

http://www.cah.utexas.edu/db/dmr/image_lg....iable=e_bb_1743

Dentler Maid potato chips, Better Maid (?) mayo (?), etc.

Edited by brucesw
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Things have certainly changed. We didn't get our first color TV until I was 13. Now, black and white TVs are almost obsolete. The only new ones I've seen are those 5-inch battery-operated portables. As you said about circuit boards replacing tubes, those have made it to where when your TV breaks down for even the first time, you would simply go ahead and throw it away. The price of TVs are now so low that you would simply go out and buy a new one. To me, I think that there are very few, if any, TV repair shops around anymore. The circuit board eliminated TV repair shops, and the jobs of the people who repaired them. You can buy a new TV for a lot less than it would cost to repair it (that is, if there were someone around who knew how to repair it).

Hummm, the circuit board didn't change too much. It's more the low price of new TV's than

anything. You can fix the solid state TV's, but like you say, the labor will often run more

than the cost of a new set, unless the set is big. There are still a few TV shops, but I don't

see how they stay afloat unless they do warranty work.

It's quite common for a solid state TV to only need a new capacitor that might cost

35 cents to fix a seemingly large problem. The small electrolytic caps are often next

to other parts that generate a lot of heat, and then they run hot, dry out, and flake out.

Same for puter monitors.. But you have to know what you are doing, and looking for.

Not quite like the old days when just blindly swapping a tube out might fix it.

Say if you had a flaky 10 mf electrolytic that was causing a problem.. You need to be

able to know what circuit is likely to be flaking out. Then you can use a chiller

spray, or heat from a hair dryer to pinpoint the area the cap is in.

Of course, many sets do eventually toast out with fried flyback tranny's, etc,

but the vast majority of "bad" TV's and monitors can be fixed with parts

costing chump change. Many have popped transisters, which are cheap..

As the price of TV's keep dropping, more people just buy new ones, rather

than trying to get fixed.

It's the same for small air conditioners.. IE: 5000 btu room size models.

I used to change many fan motors in those when the price of a new unit

was more than a motor and labor. But not the case any more with the

home depots, etc selling new units for 100 bucks..

No way will I change a motor for that price.. So I don't see any more

of those.. Even the servicing of larger window units has dropped off

quite a bit.. BTW, I have my own tube testers here at the house..

One is a sencore, and one is a hickock.. Both are pretty good.

I still have an old 1958 transoceanic too sitting under the table here..

Have a 1948 RCA radio/phono console on the other side of the room..

Lots of older tube ham radio gear too. Mostly Drakes...

MK

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I remember going to Henke & Pillot in the early 50's as a small boy........

My family and I lived in the East End until the mid-1950's. There was a Henke & Pillot on Polk near the underpass and my mother shopped there often. I remember it well from the WWII years before it was remodeled. It was nothing like today's clean, brightly lit supermarkets. It had no air conditioning; black Hunter fans on long downrods hung from the ceiling. The floor was cement. Shopping carts were lightweight metal frames with removable wire baskets on the top and bottom racks. Their wheels were small and often worn out because there weren't replacement parts due to the war.

There were no open refrigerator cases filled with prepackaged food; meat, fish, whole chickens and delicatessen items on white enamel trays surrounded by rows of bright green fake rubber "leaves" were in glass front cases. Some of the cases had pink neon lights in them to make the meat look fresher. The butcher cut what you wanted, weighed it, wrapped it in pale pink paper and wrote the price on it in crayon. You thanked him and put it in your "basket", where it usually leaked. The produce department had seasonal, mostly locally grown items only, a small selection by today's standards. Paper bags were furnished so the customer could choose her own fruit and vegetables; an attendant weighed them and marked the price on the bag. Dried beans, coffee beans, candy were in glass front bins and were measured out and weighed for the customer. Milk (usually whole with cream layered on the top) cream and cottage cheese were in returnable glass bottles, as were soft drinks and beer. The aisles of canned and packaged goods were few and skimpily stocked by today's standards. Everything there had its price stamped in purple ink. A small freezer chest held square pint and quart packages of ice cream; frozen foods were virtually unknown.

At the checkout stand, an attendant took the groceries out of the "basket" and put them on the counter. There was no conveyor belt; instead, the cashier dragged them toward her with a three-sided wooden frame attached to tracks on the edges of the counter. Although the cash register was electric, it printed only the prices and total on the register tape. Everybody paid cash, and cashiers actually had to know how to make change. Anybody with more than two brown paper bags of groceries had them carried out to the car, and a dime tip to the bag boy was considered HUGE!

During the war, my mother also shopped at the old Weingarten's store on Harrisburg and Dumble (now that handsomely restored brick building,) and a short-lived place called FoodTown, which had better meat than Henke's or Weingarten's. FoodTown also managed to get other things that were scarce during the war, but nobody asked any questions.

Note: in this post I did not go into the use of food ration stamps - that's for the section on Houston during WWII.

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Hummm, the circuit board didn't change too much. It's more the low price of new TV's than

anything. You can fix the solid state TV's, but like you say, the labor will often run more

than the cost of a new set, unless the set is big. There are still a few TV shops, but I don't

see how they stay afloat unless they do warranty work.

It's quite common for a solid state TV to only need a new capacitor that might cost

35 cents to fix a seemingly large problem. The small electrolytic caps are often next

to other parts that generate a lot of heat, and then they run hot, dry out, and flake out.

Same for puter monitors.. But you have to know what you are doing, and looking for.

Not quite like the old days when just blindly swapping a tube out might fix it.

Say if you had a flaky 10 mf electrolytic that was causing a problem.. You need to be

able to know what circuit is likely to be flaking out. Then you can use a chiller

spray, or heat from a hair dryer to pinpoint the area the cap is in.

Of course, many sets do eventually toast out with fried flyback tranny's, etc,

but the vast majority of "bad" TV's and monitors can be fixed with parts

costing chump change. Many have popped transisters, which are cheap..

As the price of TV's keep dropping, more people just buy new ones, rather

than trying to get fixed.

It's the same for small air conditioners.. IE: 5000 btu room size models.

I used to change many fan motors in those when the price of a new unit

was more than a motor and labor. But not the case any more with the

home depots, etc selling new units for 100 bucks..

No way will I change a motor for that price.. So I don't see any more

of those.. Even the servicing of larger window units has dropped off

quite a bit.. BTW, I have my own tube testers here at the house..

One is a sencore, and one is a hickock.. Both are pretty good.

I still have an old 1958 transoceanic too sitting under the table here..

Have a 1948 RCA radio/phono console on the other side of the room..

Lots of older tube ham radio gear too. Mostly Drakes...

MK

Whether it's circuit boards or whatever, new TV prices are LOW. I live alone, and I personally am satisfied with a 13-inch. Best Buy has them for $59.95 (no built-in VCR/DVD). If I bought one of those and it broke down in a year or two, I will have gotten my money's worth. I'm pretty sure that a repair shop would charge more than that to fix it. I would simply throw it away and buy a new one. But I would try to dispose of it properly.

There's one negative result I see to the lower prices of TVs, air conditioners, etc.: You see them disposed of in all of the ditches that run alongside of the streets and roads. Since a lot of city garbage trucks will not pickup those kind of things, people simply dump them wherever they can.

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My family and I lived in the East End until the mid-1950's. There was a Henke & Pillot on Polk near the underpass and my mother shopped there often. I remember it well from the WWII years before it was remodeled. It was nothing like today's clean, brightly lit supermarkets. It had no air conditioning; black Hunter fans on long downrods hung from the ceiling. The floor was cement. Shopping carts were lightweight metal frames with removable wire baskets on the top and bottom racks. Their wheels were small and often worn out because there weren't replacement parts due to the war.

There were no open refrigerator cases filled with prepackaged food; meat, fish, whole chickens and delicatessen items on white enamel trays surrounded by rows of bright green fake rubber "leaves" were in glass front cases. Some of the cases had pink neon lights in them to make the meat look fresher. The butcher cut what you wanted, weighed it, wrapped it in pale pink paper and wrote the price on it in crayon. You thanked him and put it in your "basket", where it usually leaked. The produce department had seasonal, mostly locally grown items only, a small selection by today's standards. Paper bags were furnished so the customer could choose her own fruit and vegetables; an attendant weighed them and marked the price on the bag. Dried beans, coffee beans, candy were in glass front bins and were measured out and weighed for the customer. Milk (usually whole with cream layered on the top) cream and cottage cheese were in returnable glass bottles, as were soft drinks and beer. The aisles of canned and packaged goods were few and skimpily stocked by today's standards. Everything there had its price stamped in purple ink. A small freezer chest held square pint and quart packages of ice cream; frozen foods were virtually unknown.

At the checkout stand, an attendant took the groceries out of the "basket" and put them on the counter. There was no conveyor belt; instead, the cashier dragged them toward her with a three-sided wooden frame attached to tracks on the edges of the counter. Although the cash register was electric, it printed only the prices and total on the register tape. Everybody paid cash, and cashiers actually had to know how to make change. Anybody with more than two brown paper bags of groceries had them carried out to the car, and a dime tip to the bag boy was considered HUGE!

During the war, my mother also shopped at the old Weingarten's store on Harrisburg and Dumble (now that handsomely restored brick building,) and a short-lived place called FoodTown, which had better meat than Henke's or Weingarten's. FoodTown also managed to get other things that were scarce during the war, but nobody asked any questions.

Note: in this post I did not go into the use of food ration stamps - that's for the section on Houston during WWII.

Very interesting writing. Now you've taught me that they were called "glass front bins." When we would go into Newberry's in Gulfgate, we would look into those "glass front bins" at the jelly beans, cashews, candy corn, malted milk balls, etc. The attendant used a steel scoop to get some out, pour it onto the scale, then put them into a small paper (some places used waxed) bag, and you'd snack on it while the grownups did their shopping. In grocery stores, I was sometimes given a box of animal crackers to keep me quiet while my mom shopped. I remember going to the Weingarten's store in Gulfgate.

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There's one negative result I see to the lower prices of TVs, air conditioners, etc.: You see them disposed of in all of the ditches that run alongside of the streets and roads. Since a lot of city garbage trucks will not pickup those kind of things, people simply dump them wherever they can.

I guess that brings up the question: Where do I get rid of my TV when it goes bad? I haven't ever gotten rid of a TV. I just give 'em away to someone when I get a new one (well, I've only done that twice, so it's not like I'm buying a new TV every year).

My current TV is 10 years old. Still works great, but who knows how much longer it will last? So, if it goes kaput, I guess I can't put it in the trash? So where does it go?

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Very interesting writing. Now you've taught me that they were called "glass front bins." When we would go into Newberry's in Gulfgate, we would look into those "glass front bins" at the jelly beans, cashews, candy corn, malted milk balls, etc. The attendant used a steel scoop to get some out, pour it onto the scale, then put them into a small paper (some places used waxed) bag, and you'd snack on it while the grownups did their shopping. In grocery stores, I was sometimes given a box of animal crackers to keep me quiet while my mom shopped. I remember going to the Weingarten's store in Gulfgate.

Well, living as long as I have gives me an appreciation of the past that I didn't have when I was younger - a sense of history of these parts, especially since I'm a native Houstonian.

A lot of stores had those wonderful candy counters. All the five and dime stores downtown had them. There was one at the Sears store on Main Street at least through the 1950's. When the downtown Foley's (now Macy's) opened in its present location, they had a candy counter selling quality chocolates by the piece (or by the box, packed to order).

Animal crackers - yum! I still like 'em! They were a nickel a box when I was a kid and a fairly wholesome snack, compared to what kids eat today.

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Well, living as long as I have gives me an appreciation of the past that I didn't have when I was younger - a sense of history of these parts, especially since I'm a native Houstonian.

A lot of stores had those wonderful candy counters. All the five and dime stores downtown had them. There was one at the Sears store on Main Street at least through the 1950's. When the downtown Foley's (now Macy's) opened in its present location, they had a candy counter selling quality chocolates by the piece (or by the box, packed to order).

Animal crackers - yum! I still like 'em! They were a nickel a box when I was a kid and a fairly wholesome snack, compared to what kids eat today.

I'll be 50 next year. Just like you, I have an appreciation of the past that I didn't have when I was younger. For example, the understanding the telephone was at one time fairly simple. When it would ring, you would simply answer it. There was no Caller ID. If you called someone and the line was busy, you simply had to hang up and call them back later. There was no Call Waiting. You dialedthe number you wanted to call. Now we push buttons, but we still call it dial.

Yes, a long distance call cost a lot more back then. But you simply knew not to call a city that was long distance from where you live. Yes, I have a cell phone, but I hardly use it. Mostly for emergencies. It's prepaid. I don't have to open up and be shocked by a bill where my daughter sent 161 text messages (that happened to a former co-worker of mine). It doesn't rule and control my life the way I've seen it do many other people who talk while driving, in stores, etc. I bought a pre-paid long distance calling card to use on my home phone so that I won't have an unpleasant surprise whenever I open that bill.

People could simplify their lives if they really wanted to. Go to bed earlier, so that you can get up earlier, so that you can leave earlier, so that you can drive slower and get to work on time (maybe even earlier). But who am I?

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I guess that brings up the question: Where do I get rid of my TV when it goes bad? I haven't ever gotten rid of a TV. I just give 'em away to someone when I get a new one (well, I've only done that twice, so it's not like I'm buying a new TV every year).

My current TV is 10 years old. Still works great, but who knows how much longer it will last? So, if it goes kaput, I guess I can't put it in the trash? So where does it go?

Join the crowd! Just dump it in a ditch alongside the street like everyone else does.

I'm just being sarcastic. What I need to do is to call the sanitation office of the city I live in and ask them if their trucks will pickup broken down TVs & appliances. If they say "no," I don't know what I'd do. Maybe you could give your city's sanitation office a call and ask.

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Well, living as long as I have gives me an appreciation of the past that I didn't have when I was younger - a sense of history of these parts, especially since I'm a native Houstonian.

A lot of stores had those wonderful candy counters. All the five and dime stores downtown had them. There was one at the Sears store on Main Street at least through the 1950's. When the downtown Foley's (now Macy's) opened in its present location, they had a candy counter selling quality chocolates by the piece (or by the box, packed to order).

Animal crackers - yum! I still like 'em! They were a nickel a box when I was a kid and a fairly wholesome snack, compared to what kids eat today.

Yes, I'll be 50 next year. Like you, I have "an appreciation of the past that I didn't have when I was younger." But some modern items have been helpful. For example, I live alone. I don't have a stove or cooking utensils. Why should I cook? The microwave oven is enough for me. I have one bowl and one dish. I buy only canned and other non-perishable food. The only thing that I keep in my small, manual defrost refrigerator is bottled water. When I'm hungry, I simply open up a can of something and nuke it.

I just try not to let modern items "rule" or "take over" my life. Cell phones have done just that to many people. I see them driving and shopping while yakking away on them. I have a cell phone, but it's the prepaid kind. I've used it only for emergencies. When I'm driving or anywhere out in public, it's in my briefcase turned off and locked up.

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I'm 45 and I grew up in Lake Jackson. I clearly remember Henke and Pillot in Freeport, and I am sure they didn't change to Kroger until about 1968 or so. There was also a Weingarten's and a Weiners in a shopping center in Lake Jackson, along with a Montgomery Ward catalog storefront, and I think a green stamp redemption place.

I remember tube testers in 7-11 and hardware stores until I was in high school (approx. 1977-80)

I remember stamp redemption places -- Top Value, Gold Bond, and S&H Green.

I remember the Weingarten's in Rice Village -- it was the only 24-hour grocery in the area and before ATM's it was one of the few places to cash a check. This would have been 1980-82. As it faltered and died it was really NASTY. It belongs in a different forum, but the Village circa 1980 was rather scruffy and a little scary.

There was a Weiners in Pearland until 2000 or so. Now it's a Salvation Army store. Several years ago my wife was very disappointed to find that she couldn't buy hot dogs at Weiners. We were both very hungry that day.

marmer

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Yes, I'll be 50 next year. Like you, I have "an appreciation of the past that I didn't have when I was younger." But some modern items have been helpful. For example, I live alone. I don't have a stove or cooking utensils. Why should I cook? The microwave oven is enough for me. I have one bowl and one dish. I buy only canned and other non-perishable food. The only thing that I keep in my small, manual defrost refrigerator is bottled water. When I'm hungry, I simply open up a can of something and nuke it.

I just try not to let modern items "rule" or "take over" my life. Cell phones have done just that to many people. I see them driving and shopping while yakking away on them. I have a cell phone, but it's the prepaid kind. I've used it only for emergencies. When I'm driving or anywhere out in public, it's in my briefcase turned off and locked up.

Shhh... I'll be 50 tomorrow. Dont tell anyone.

I loved the candy counter at the Sears on Harrisburg and the popcorn they sold from the little window on the outside of the store. There was always popcorn all over the floor everywhere you looked. They had a great toy department downstairs. Thats where you could always find me with my mouth full of popcorn and candy looking at the toys.

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I'm 45 and I grew up in Lake Jackson. I clearly remember Henke and Pillot in Freeport, and I am sure they didn't change to Kroger until about 1968 or so.

Did the change from Henke & Pillot to Kroger happen at all stores at roughly the same time, or was it phased in over time? I can barely remember my parents talking about "going to Henke's" when I was very young, but the only Kroger that was near our house was built after the name change. I'll have to ask my folks if they remember which Henke's they patronized back then.

I remember stamp redemption places -- Top Value, Gold Bond, and S&H Green.

I think there was an S&H Redemption Center in Merchants Park - I used to pore over their catalogs for hours, entranced by all the treasures to be had if one accumulated enough stamps. We used to keep all of the various redemption stamps we got in a big cardboard box under one of the cabinets in our kitchen - I recall some yellow stamps that were larger than the small green S&H ones, but I can't remember who issued those.

I remember the Weingarten's in Rice Village -- it was the only 24-hour grocery in the area and before ATM's it was one of the few places to cash a check. This would have been 1980-82. As it faltered and died it was really NASTY. It belongs in a different forum, but the Village circa 1980 was rather scruffy and a little scary.

It was scruffy, but I never really felt unsafe there even after dark. I was a freshman at Rice in 1982, and I used to walk over to the Village from campus all the time. I liked the sleepy early '80s Village better than the traffic-congested, shopping-focused latter-day one, but then again I don't have much use for "upscale" retail establishments.

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I'm 45 and I grew up in Lake Jackson. I clearly remember Henke and Pillot in Freeport, and I am sure they didn't change to Kroger until about 1968 or so. There was also a Weingarten's and a Weiners in a shopping center in Lake Jackson, along with a Montgomery Ward catalog storefront, and I think a green stamp redemption place.

I remember tube testers in 7-11 and hardware stores until I was in high school (approx. 1977-80)

I remember stamp redemption places -- Top Value, Gold Bond, and S&H Green.

I remember the Weingarten's in Rice Village -- it was the only 24-hour grocery in the area and before ATM's it was one of the few places to cash a check. This would have been 1980-82. As it faltered and died it was really NASTY. It belongs in a different forum, but the Village circa 1980 was rather scruffy and a little scary.

There was a Weiners in Pearland until 2000 or so. Now it's a Salvation Army store. Several years ago my wife was very disappointed to find that she couldn't buy hot dogs at Weiners. We were both very hungry that day.

marmer

I remember the pink Big Bonus stamps. The redemption center was at the y where Telephone and Reville split. My mom got her purse stolen there the last time we went in the early 70's

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Did the change from Henke & Pillot to Kroger happen at all stores at roughly the same time, or was it phased in over time? I can barely remember my parents talking about "going to Henke's" when I was very young, but the only Kroger that was near our house was built after the name change. I'll have to ask my folks if they remember which Henke's they patronized back then.

I think there was an S&H Redemption Center in Merchants Park - I used to pore over their catalogs for hours, entranced by all the treasures to be had if one accumulated enough stamps. We used to keep all of the various redemption stamps we got in a big cardboard box under one of the cabinets in our kitchen - I recall some yellow stamps that were larger than the small green S&H ones, but I can't remember who issued those.

It was scruffy, but I never really felt unsafe there even after dark. I was a freshman at Rice in 1982, and I used to walk over to the Village from campus all the time. I liked the sleepy early '80s Village better than the traffic-congested, shopping-focused latter-day one, but then again I don't have much use for "upscale" retail establishments.

Sounds like you and I may have known each other IRL! I was a freshman at Rice in 1980! Also, in Lake Jackson, after the Henke's in Freeport changed to Kroger, there was a newer Kroger built in the mid-'70s. About that time Kroger built a newer store in Freeport, too, and the old Henke store changed hands. It was Gerlands for a while and now I think it's an independent. Still a grocery store, though.

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Shhh... I'll be 50 tomorrow. Dont tell anyone.

I loved the candy counter at the Sears on Harrisburg and the popcorn they sold from the little window on the outside of the store. There was always popcorn all over the floor everywhere you looked. They had a great toy department downstairs. Thats where you could always find me with my mouth full of popcorn and candy looking at the toys.

Happy Birthday!!!

I remember the pink Big Bonus stamps. The redemption center was at the y where Telephone and Reville split. My mom got her purse stolen there the last time we went in the early 70's

I thought that Big Bonus stamps were blue. But when I went into the Navy I was told that I was 84% color blind. When I lived in Houston, my mother's friend bought her groceries at A&P. My mom said that she didn't go shopping with her because A&P gave out Plaid Stamps, and she preferred Big Bonus which is one of the reasons why she shopped at the Weingarten's in Gulfgate.

LOL

That's like a time when I was looking for a job in the Help Wanted section of the newspaper back when I was unskilled. I saw an ad for job openings in Labor & Delivery which caught my eye. It was at a hospital. I was getting ready to go down there and inquire about the job when I realized that the ad meant that they wanted nurses for the maternity ward.

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I liked the sleepy early '80s Village better than the traffic-congested, shopping-focused latter-day one, but then again I don't have much use for "upscale" retail establishments.

Oh, by the way, AMEN to that, brotha! (or sista, depending on your gender)

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I guess that brings up the question: Where do I get rid of my TV when it goes bad? I haven't ever gotten rid of a TV. I just give 'em away to someone when I get a new one (well, I've only done that twice, so it's not like I'm buying a new TV every year).

My current TV is 10 years old. Still works great, but who knows how much longer it will last? So, if it goes kaput, I guess I can't put it in the trash? So where does it go?

The city recycling center on Westpark @ Fountainview takes old TVs, computer monitors, other electronic junk. I think there's a list availabe on the city website of recycling centers and what they'll take. We have private garbage service in my neighborhood but my recycling bin keeps getting stolen so I just save things up and make a trip 2 or 3 times a year with my car stuffed with plastic and glass bottles, newspapers and magazines, etc.

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I'm 45 and I grew up in Lake Jackson. I clearly remember Henke and Pillot in Freeport, and I am sure they didn't change to Kroger until about 1968 or so. There was also a Weingarten's and a Weiners in a shopping center in Lake Jackson, along with a Montgomery Ward catalog storefront, and I think a green stamp redemption place.

I remember tube testers in 7-11 and hardware stores until I was in high school (approx. 1977-80)

The Henke and Pillot on 288 @ Gulf Blvd in what was then Velasco and the Weingarten's on 2nd street just down from Brazosport Hi were built about the same time. There was also a big Penney's in the Weingarten center. The buildings have been razed but I think the pad is still there. Before that the big grocery store in the area was Girouard's on 2nd street in Freeport @ the old railroad trestle. It's been a Piggly Wiggly and IGA and is still there, now a sporting goods store, I think, but still Girouard's. It probably goes back to the 20s or 30s.

The first grocery in Lake Jackson was not even a supermarket, it was a place you went up to a counter and told the clerk what you wanted and they got it for you. That may have been during food rationing and I was very young and only vaguely remember it. It was on North Parking Place, behind the Lake Theatre.

Then there was what I think was a Piggly Wiggly at Parking Way at This Way, later an A&P (or maybe it was the other way around) and Shadduck's, right across This Way Street. Both buildings are still there.

I may be off on my suggestion of when H&P changed to Kroger - if you're 45 and you remember Henke and Pillot.

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The Henke and Pillot on 288 @ Gulf Blvd in what was then Velasco and the Weingarten's on 2nd street just down from Brazosport Hi were built about the same time. There was also a big Penney's in the Weingarten center. The buildings have been razed but I think the pad is still there. Before that the big grocery store in the area was Girouard's on 2nd street in Freeport @ the old railroad trestle. It's been a Piggly Wiggly and IGA and is still there, now a sporting goods store, I think, but still Girouard's. It probably goes back to the 20s or 30s.

The first grocery in Lake Jackson was not even a supermarket, it was a place you went up to a counter and told the clerk what you wanted and they got it for you. That may have been during food rationing and I was very young and only vaguely remember it. It was on North Parking Place, behind the Lake Theatre.

Then there was what I think was a Piggly Wiggly at Parking Way at This Way, later an A&P (or maybe it was the other way around) and Shadduck's, right across This Way Street. Both buildings are still there.

I may be off on my suggestion of when H&P changed to Kroger - if you're 45 and you remember Henke and Pillot.

Back in the early 1960s I remember a Henke & Pillot where Telephone Road intersected with Reveille Street. There was a Monterey House restaurant across the street from it.

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The Henke and Pillot on 288 @ Gulf Blvd in what was then Velasco and the Weingarten's on 2nd street just down from Brazosport Hi were built about the same time. There was also a big Penney's in the Weingarten center. The buildings have been razed but I think the pad is still there. Before that the big grocery store in the area was Girouard's on 2nd street in Freeport @ the old railroad trestle. It's been a Piggly Wiggly and IGA and is still there, now a sporting goods store, I think, but still Girouard's. It probably goes back to the 20s or 30s.

You and I must have been stomping the same ground. I remember all those stores very well. Yes, the Weingarten/Penney's shopping center has been demolished. Girouard's is still there and surprisingly similar to what it used to be. In the old days it was a reasonably good place to get fishing tackle, nautical charts, and boating gear, along with a small selection of groceries. It was certainly reasonable to see rubber boots stocked right next to canned goods at Girouard's. A true general store.

The first grocery in Lake Jackson was not even a supermarket, it was a place you went up to a counter and told the clerk what you wanted and they got it for you. That may have been during food rationing and I was very young and only vaguely remember it. It was on North Parking Place, behind the Lake Theatre.
That I don't remember, not quite old enough for that. What I remember behind Lake Theatre was La Velle dress shop, Younglandia, Croney's men's wear, Nowlin Jewelry, and Garrett's pharmacy. Also Woodrum-Duensing hardware and Jack Reid's appliances across the street in the other direction.
Then there was what I think was a Piggly Wiggly at Parking Way at This Way, later an A&P (or maybe it was the other way around) and Shadduck's, right across This Way Street. Both buildings are still there.

I don't remember Piggly Wiggly. I clearly remember Shaddock's, which is where my mother started shopping when Henke's changed to Kroger. I also clearly remember that groceries for a week for a family of three cost $20.00! The grocery store that was across the street from Shaddock's was A&P. On the same side of the street as Shaddock's was Wacker's dime store and Brockman's clothing store. Across the street was Sportville, a wonderland of model cars and sporting goods. When I was really small they had a big slot car track in the back. Next door to that was the Brazosport museum and next to that the library. Then A&P.

I may be off on my suggestion of when H&P changed to Kroger - if you're 45 and you remember Henke and Pillot.

I am pretty sure about the change because we stopped going there shortly after I entered school. No earlier than 1966, and probably a year or two later.

I also remember Woolworth's in Lake Jackson, anchoring the Weingarten's, Weiners, Ward's and Woolworth-quartet shopping center at the corner of Plantation and Dixie Drive. It had the characteristic unforgettable smell of popcorn, candy, and plastic. I barely remember Grant's in Freeport, which was a similar kind of store, I believe. In those days we'd see national restaurant chains advertised on TV and they were not in our area. I remember what a big deal it was when KFC opened on Plantation Drive.

I've already posted before about how sad I was to see Brazosport High School so horribly defaced, even though they did keep and renovate the auditorium, thank goodess.

My timeline is as follows: born 1961, graduated Brazoswood HS 1980, graduated Rice U. 1985, rented in Montrose until 1990, have lived in Pearland since then. My mother still lives in Lake Jackson, in the same house she's owned since 1952.

marmer

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You and I must have been stomping the same ground. I remember all those stores very well. Yes, the Weingarten/Penney's shopping center has been demolished. Girouard's is still there and surprisingly similar to what it used to be. In the old days it was a reasonably good place to get fishing tackle, nautical charts, and boating gear, along with a small selection of groceries. It was certainly reasonable to see rubber boots stocked right next to canned goods at Girouard's. A true general store.

That I don't remember, not quite old enough for that. What I remember behind Lake Theatre was La Velle dress shop, Younglandia, Croney's men's wear, Nowlin Jewelry, and Garrett's pharmacy. Also Woodrum-Duensing hardware and Jack Reid's appliances across the street in the other direction.

I don't remember Piggly Wiggly. I clearly remember Shaddock's, which is where my mother started shopping when Henke's changed to Kroger. I also clearly remember that groceries for a week for a family of three cost $20.00! The grocery store that was across the street from Shaddock's was A&P. On the same side of the street as Shaddock's was Wacker's dime store and Brockman's clothing store. Across the street was Sportville, a wonderland of model cars and sporting goods. When I was really small they had a big slot car track in the back. Next door to that was the Brazosport museum and next to that the library. Then A&P.

I am pretty sure about the change because we stopped going there shortly after I entered school. No earlier than 1966, and probably a year or two later.

I also remember Woolworth's in Lake Jackson, anchoring the Weingarten's, Weiners, Ward's and Woolworth-quartet shopping center at the corner of Plantation and Dixie Drive. It had the characteristic unforgettable smell of popcorn, candy, and plastic. I barely remember Grant's in Freeport, which was a similar kind of store, I believe. In those days we'd see national restaurant chains advertised on TV and they were not in our area. I remember what a big deal it was when KFC opened on Plantation Drive.

I've already posted before about how sad I was to see Brazosport High School so horribly defaced, even though they did keep and renovate the auditorium, thank goodess.

My timeline is as follows: born 1961, graduated Brazoswood HS 1980, graduated Rice U. 1985, rented in Montrose until 1990, have lived in Pearland since then. My mother still lives in Lake Jackson, in the same house she's owned since 1952.

marmer

Kind of off topic, I read that the physical address of Rice University is 6100 South Main. But I can't find the physical address of the University of Houston. Is it near Rice? There probably aren't any grocery stores in that area.

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Kind of off topic, I read that the physical address of Rice University is 6100 South Main. But I can't find the physical address of the University of Houston. Is it near Rice? There probably aren't any grocery stores in that area.

UH is at 4800 Calhoun Street. It's not exactly near Rice, though they're both inside the Loop. They are

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