Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
musicman

Flooding 6/19

Recommended Posts

watching news and the've mentioned Glenbrook, Woodridge 610, and many areas along gulf freeway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yeah, it's craptacular around here - i'll be staying home this morning

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
yeah, it's craptacular around here - i'll be staying home this morning

Ditto, I probably won't be working today.

already went through two games of "homeworld" now I'm pondering lunch. since I eat out so often, I don't have anything at home. :mellow:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a plant or factory ingulfed in flames somewhere around the port...a news helicopter was circuling it, showing that and the flooded subdivisions. Ah yes....another installment of Chaos, disaster, and mayhem. Why is it that every year or two, we go thru a day or two of mayhem, and then carry on after that like nothing ever happened.

I hope this is our installment for this summer, and that we dont get another big storm for at least a year. I can handle these things only about every 3 years or so.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i only saw the coverage of the grain warehouse in pearland, and that looked awful :(

so i tried to make it to work (and i did) but realized i just f*&ked any good chance of me getting home. all ways back were not passable, unless we get no more rain :unsure:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Did anyone get water in their homes or was it just street flooding?

in my area, there didn't seem to be anything other than street flooding (the major thoroughfare streets like telephone, park place/long, and the freeways).

i know further south, closer to hobby airport, it was alot worse.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i just do not get it...we have the mental capacity to build a nuclear weapon, but we still cannot build a good flood control system.....i guess it is because the rain fell so fast

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
in my area, there didn't seem to be anything other than street flooding (the major thoroughfare streets like telephone, park place/long, and the freeways).

i know further south, closer to hobby airport, it was alot worse.

I have a friend that lives at Monroe and I-45, but I think they are out of town. I'm hoping he didn't get water in his place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

parents got some water. but floor was polished concrete. Only about a 2 square ft area though. Detached garage had massive flooding. next block over had numerous homes that flooded. freeway manor flooded. southcrest flooded. woodridge and 45south had about 5' of water under freeway. broadway and 610 people are saying that is the deepest. much of monroe, telephone, fuqua, edgebrook are still flooded.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
parents got some water. but floor was polished concrete. Only about a 2 square ft area though. Detached garage had massive flooding. next block over had numerous homes that flooded. freeway manor flooded. southcrest flooded. woodridge and 45south had about 5' of water under freeway. broadway and 610 people are saying that is the deepest. much of monroe, telephone, fuqua, edgebrook are still flooded.

Freeway Manor? Is that Gulf Freeway Oaks? My friend's home is on Anacortes (about 5 blocks south of I-45 on Monroe).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
i just do not get it...we have the mental capacity to build a nuclear weapon, but we still cannot build a good flood control system.....i guess it is because the rain fell so fast

We could easily build a better flood control system...all it takes is $$$. Lots of $$$. Billions of $$$...and that's just for the City of Houston. HCFCD could also easily spend Billions of $$$ to try to help the situation.

Right now, the standard in Houston and Harris County is to design drainage systems (but not necessarily storm sewers) for the 100-year storm. That's a storm that statistically has a 1% chance of happening in any given year. Today's flooding is exacerbated by two issues: one, the rainfall at Gulfgate was greater than a 100-year storm, and two, drainage systems in our area have only been designed for the 100-year event since 1984, so there's a LOT of infrastructure that doesn't meet the current standard.

According to the Chronicle, up to 10.7 inches of rain fell in 3 hours. According to the National Weather Service Technical Paper 40, a 3-hour 100-year storm event is 7 inches. 10.7 inches in TWELVE hours would have been a 100-year storm event (for a 12-hr duration)...obviously 10.7 inches in 3 hours is well above a 100-year event.

HCFCD has been working pretty aggressively for a number of years now to improve flooding conditions in various watersheds. HCFCD has spent nearly $1 BILLION over the last 5 years in Capital Improvements, such as channel improvements, regional detention basins and other improvements.

That being said, the biggest issue is generally not bayou capacity, but local infrastructure capacity...that is, on the street level: storm sewers and curb inlets, as well as the street grades. In general, anything built in Harris County before 1984 is not up to snuff, and that's being conservative. In reality, it was several years after 1984 that the criteria was actually implemented, and that's only for unincorporated Harris County...the City of Houston is a different story. I'm not certain when storm water detention requirements were implemented in Houston, but it was certainly after Harris County implemented it.

Solving the local drainage infrastructure issue, on a street-by-street basis, will be massively expensive, as you can well imagine. HCFCD and the City of Houston are embarking on a drainage study right now to determine just how much drainage improvement that citizens are willing to pay for, and what level of service they expect (i.e., prevent all street flooding, or just prevent home flooding). Engineers can solve any problem...the question is, how much is our community willing to pay?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We lived off of Edgebrook for 18 years, in the Sun Valley subdivision. Anybody who knows that area knows that is is known for it's intense flooding. We just moved about 9 months ago. And guess what? Our old house made the news!!...it's surrounded by water...check it out:

http://abclocal.go.com/ktrk/slideShow?sect...4283776&slide=3

Our old house is the one behind the trees. I think the water last night got up to the front porch....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Freeway Manor? Is that Gulf Freeway Oaks? My friend's home is on Anacortes (about 5 blocks south of I-45 on Monroe).

Nope. Gulf Freeway Oaks was hit hard as well. Monroe is STILL flooded from the freeway to Almeda Genoa.

Edited by musicman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
We lived off of Edgebrook for 18 years, in the Sun Valley subdivision. Anybody who knows that area knows that is is known for it's intense flooding. We just moved about 9 months ago. And guess what? Our old house made the news!!...it's surrounded by water...check it out:

http://abclocal.go.com/ktrk/slideShow?sect...4283776&slide=3

Our old house is the one behind the trees. I think the water last night got up to the front porch....

My grandma lives right down the street from Freeman Elementary...the water was an inch away from going into her garage this morning.

She had about an inch in her house during TS Allison.

An aunt and uncle in South Houston were completely under water...the street, their yard, everything for blocks around was a good 1' or so under water. Luckily they're on pier and beam, so no water in the house.

They also said this storm was very close to where it was during TS Allison.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
i just do not get it...we have the mental capacity to build a nuclear weapon, but we still cannot build a good flood control system.....i guess it is because the rain fell so fast

We can build it. We can build anything to keep you safe from every possible situation. As long as you don't mind paying 95% of your income in taxes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest danax

I made it to work from Pecan Park ok, but had to detour quite a bit due to street flooding. The Brays under Lawndale was dangerously high in the morning. Idlywood people along McGregor were probably alert.

I spoke to co-worker by phone this morning who lives in Glenbrook Valley, as do her sister and brother, all in separate houses, all on the lesser side (non-Sims Bayou side) of the subdivision. Her sister's car got flooded to the roof and supposedly a BMW was underwater on the Bayou side.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
i just do not get it...we have the mental capacity to build a nuclear weapon, but we still cannot build a good flood control system.....i guess it is because the rain fell so fast

Perhaps we could employ nukes to vaporize the rain in the air, before it hits the ground.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I made it to work from Pecan Park ok, but had to detour quite a bit due to street flooding. The Brays under Lawndale was dangerously high in the morning. Idlywood people along McGregor were probably alert.

I spoke to co-worker by phone this morning who lives in Glenbrook Valley, as do her sister and brother, all in separate houses, all on the lesser side (non-Sims Bayou side) of the subdivision. Her sister's car got flooded to the roof and supposedly a BMW was underwater on the Bayou side.

My house in Glenbrook was high and dry. I don't think there was any water in houses on the lesser side. Right where the two cul-de-sacs of Stony Dell & Glen Dell intersect there is a real low spot. One of the houses has the garage underneath it. It got water (of course if your garage is built basically in a river bed...) and a couple built low into that ravine/gully got it too I think. There was also a couple built into a low spot on Dover that sort of sit in a "bowl," those got it but I think that was the extent of it. Sims never got close to the ones backing up to it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I went on Long and Telephone Road around Noon and saw water over the curb on pretty much every street in Golfcrest and some residents touring the area in boat.

Also water was over Telephone Road up near Winkler and Broad. I also noticed water around the new Perry Home Plum Creek subdivison and those Village Way apartments. Dunno if it made it inside any of them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

that area by the park on long dr. between telephone and 610 was still underwater on the westbound side at 5:30 this evening...but it floods there all the time

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My house in Glenbrook was high and dry. I don't think there was any water in houses on the lesser side. Right where the two cul-de-sacs of Stony Dell & Glen Dell intersect there is a real low spot. One of the houses has the garage underneath it. It got water (of course if your garage is built basically in a river bed...) and a couple built low into that ravine/gully got it too I think. There was also a couple built into a low spot on Dover that sort of sit in a "bowl," those got it but I think that was the extent of it. Sims never got close to the ones backing up to it.

We got water up through the floors. Not flood water but had about an inch or so in a good part of the house. Spent all day pulling up padding and carpet in 3 rooms. Luckily I wanted to replace the carpet and flooring anyway but still not how I planned to spend my day.

Rob tried to get to work since he's a firefighter but he flooded out his truck on Glen Valley. Not sure why he tried to leave since there was a gentleman parked in our driveway who had tried to get to work at the airport. He told Rob that we're surrounded and you can't get through. But Rob tried anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
We got water up through the floors. Not flood water but had about an inch or so in a good part of the house. Spent all day pulling up padding and carpet in 3 rooms. Luckily I wanted to replace the carpet and flooring anyway but still not how I planned to spend my day.

Rob tried to get to work since he's a firefighter but he flooded out his truck on Glen Valley. Not sure why he tried to leave since there was a gentleman parked in our driveway who had tried to get to work at the airport. He told Rob that we're surrounded and you can't get through. But Rob tried anyway.

Was it water rising up out of the street or what?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
We got water up through the floors. Not flood water but had about an inch or so in a good part of the house. Spent all day pulling up padding and carpet in 3 rooms. Luckily I wanted to replace the carpet and flooring anyway but still not how I planned to spend my day.

Rob tried to get to work since he's a firefighter but he flooded out his truck on Glen Valley. Not sure why he tried to leave since there was a gentleman parked in our driveway who had tried to get to work at the airport. He told Rob that we're surrounded and you can't get through. But Rob tried anyway.

May i ask where you were located?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just heard that HISD police station was flooded. What the heck, now does a city office get flooded after Allison? They had to transfer command to the county emergency offices. Waste waste waste waste waste. Thats HISD for you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
May i ask where you were located?

I'm on Santa Elena near Broadway.

The water appears to have come up from a crack in the foundation in one of our rooms. The street in front of our house was completely passable during the storm, the water in the house didn't come from that. So at least the water in the house was fairly clean. Now we just have to see if the Flood policy covers it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10.7 inches in TWELVE hours would have been a 100-year storm event (for a 12-hr duration)...obviously 10.7 inches in 3 hours is well above a 100-year event.

good post, i was trying to explain this to some of my coworkers who were complaining. i like to bring up SoCal, where they're all from - considering a few inches there can cause havoc.

my question is, if this was a 100-year storm, and 5 years ago we had a 1000-year storm, should they back and change the definition, leading to changing the standards that we build to?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
good post, i was trying to explain this to some of my coworkers who were complaining. i like to bring up SoCal, where they're all from - considering a few inches there can cause havoc.

my question is, if this was a 100-year storm, and 5 years ago we had a 1000-year storm, should they back and change the definition, leading to changing the standards that we build to?

Both the 100 & 1000 year floods are engineering SWAG's :blush:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
We could easily build a better flood control system...all it takes is $$$. Lots of $$$. Billions of $$$...and that's just for the City of Houston. HCFCD could also easily spend Billions of $$$ to try to help the situation.

Right now, the standard in Houston and Harris County is to design drainage systems (but not necessarily storm sewers) for the 100-year storm. That's a storm that statistically has a 1% chance of happening in any given year. Today's flooding is exacerbated by two issues: one, the rainfall at Gulfgate was greater than a 100-year storm, and two, drainage systems in our area have only been designed for the 100-year event since 1984, so there's a LOT of infrastructure that doesn't meet the current standard.

According to the Chronicle, up to 10.7 inches of rain fell in 3 hours. According to the National Weather Service Technical Paper 40, a 3-hour 100-year storm event is 7 inches. 10.7 inches in TWELVE hours would have been a 100-year storm event (for a 12-hr duration)...obviously 10.7 inches in 3 hours is well above a 100-year event.

HCFCD has been working pretty aggressively for a number of years now to improve flooding conditions in various watersheds. HCFCD has spent nearly $1 BILLION over the last 5 years in Capital Improvements, such as channel improvements, regional detention basins and other improvements.

That being said, the biggest issue is generally not bayou capacity, but local infrastructure capacity...that is, on the street level: storm sewers and curb inlets, as well as the street grades. In general, anything built in Harris County before 1984 is not up to snuff, and that's being conservative. In reality, it was several years after 1984 that the criteria was actually implemented, and that's only for unincorporated Harris County...the City of Houston is a different story. I'm not certain when storm water detention requirements were implemented in Houston, but it was certainly after Harris County implemented it.

Solving the local drainage infrastructure issue, on a street-by-street basis, will be massively expensive, as you can well imagine. HCFCD and the City of Houston are embarking on a drainage study right now to determine just how much drainage improvement that citizens are willing to pay for, and what level of service they expect (i.e., prevent all street flooding, or just prevent home flooding). Engineers can solve any problem...the question is, how much is our community willing to pay?

What you have said is true, but you have to be careful what you are asking for. There are two schools of thought, one is to get the water out as fast as possible (as you seem to be implying is the answer), the other is to allow water to back up locally to keep is from hitting the bayous all at once. If we "fix" local infrastructure capacity, that could in turn create huge flooding problems along bayou floodplains. Choose your poison. The way it stands now, localized street flooding with some houses and businesses with a few inches to a foot of water usually isn't a life-threatening scenario. The water in that scenario is calm. Having a raging bayou flooding streets and bridges in it's path is much more life-threatening IMHO.

What we in Houston have to accept is that if 10" of rain falls in your area in a few hours, you are at risk to get flooding whether you are in the 100 year flood plain or not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...