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Residents who don't purchase or build adequate parking accommodations at their residence get "inconvenienced" by other people parking on a public street. If they want more parking, let them build it. The public street is paid for by all of us.

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I wish her the best of luck, but a couple of things in that article made my eyes roll.     She was on a block with four restaurants. With several others within a couple-hundred feet.

Not enough time to argue about it but still plenty of time to spread your misinformation, I see. Nah, making ironic grievances against the Heights Wal-Mart has become a sort of internet meme, like Pl

Don't worry. The new Walmart development will be filled with "chef driven" restaurants.

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Well, Mark, you could do what others in the Heights do with their ditches...fill it with rock.  It would still serve its water-handling purpose, but also give you a surface you could drive on in a pinch.  Of course, I don't know what that might do to your drainage fee. 

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Residents who don't purchase or build adequate parking accommodations at their residence get "inconvenienced" by other people parking on a public street. If they want more parking, let them build it. The public street is paid for by all of us.

Yeah...that's kind of the bottom line. The street is public and anyone can park there unless the city puts in signs or an ordinance (like street parking permits for residents). That's why you might have to physically occupy the space if you want to mitigate the problem.

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For people who think that parking is not a legitimate complaint for the houses who are near bars are just flat out stupid...nobody tolerates non-residents continually inconveniencing residents...nobody...its not a realistic expectation.  If bars can do it, why not just let Tommie Vaughn park all their super duty inventory up and down neighborhood streets until they sell or get stolen? 

 

People can complain about on street parking if they want.  It just doesn’t seem to be brought up when the “right” businesses are opening up around here, and dealing with it is a minor part of living in a city.

 

In my case, I am betting if a restaurant or gym opens up in the building at 11 ½ and Studewood it will impact parking on the street around my house.  And I am sure that people not wanting to go to River Oaks, City Center or Sugar Land (suburbs, ew!) will park there too when Ruggles Green opens up and brings the suburbs to the Heights. But whatever, I don’t have an issue with people legally parking on the public streets.  But if problems do ensue from it, I’ll pursue remedies to get the COH to manage the city street better. 

 

BTW the mechanics at Tommy Vaughn park on the street along 12th, blocking two full lanes and forcing my bike into traffic.  Maybe you can stop by and tell them to stop making bikes get in your way? ;)

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Residents who don't purchase or build adequate parking accommodations at their residence get "inconvenienced" by other people parking on a public street. If they want more parking, let them build it. The public street is paid for by all of us.

 

Thats not really the issue here.  I have a driveway that goes 100' front the front of the property to my garage on the rear lot line.  The garage faces the street.  If someone legally parks in the street behind my driveway I can not get out of my driveway b/c the street is too narrow. 

 

I have enough parking to park 10 cars in my driveway - but it only takes one "legally" parked idiot to block all 10 in.  Do you not see the problem here?  The street is too narrow for trucks to get out of the driveway when people park on the street behind driveways - People parking on the street cant park with 2 wheels off the road and in the grass b/c my street has deep ditches that start not more than 6" from the white line....they would slide in the ditch if they got their wheels off the road....I cant fill the ditch across the street from me b/c I don't own it, and I doubt any neighbor wants to allow me to fill it so cars can park in what used to be his front ditch.

 

I have tons of parking - and its not a problem for me 99.99% of the time, but if a bar were to open up that expects 100 people a night in 60 cars every night, but only have 15 parking spots - then it could be a huge problem - and I am absolutely going to side with the homeowner when that problem arises....They have a legal right to access their driveway.

 

Getting locked in your driveway is not a price you pay for "living in the city"

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They have a legal right to access their driveway.

 

Getting locked in your driveway is not a price you pay for "living in the city"

If you deliberately purchased a house on a narrow street bordered by ditches that are clearly too steep to allow cars to pull fully over when parking on a public thoroughfare and then try to access your driveway in a vehicle that is clearly too large for the circumstances then whose fault is that?

That's not the price you pay for "living in the city", it's the price you pay for making some lousy decisions.

Edited by august948
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Thats not really the issue here.  I have a driveway that goes 100' front the front of the property to my garage on the rear lot line.  The garage faces the street.  If someone legally parks in the street behind my driveway I can not get out of my driveway b/c the street is too narrow. 

 

I have enough parking to park 10 cars in my driveway - but it only takes one "legally" parked idiot to block all 10 in.  Do you not see the problem here?  The street is too narrow for trucks to get out of the driveway when people park on the street behind driveways - People parking on the street cant park with 2 wheels off the road and in the grass b/c my street has deep ditches that start not more than 6" from the white line....they would slide in the ditch if they got their wheels off the road....I cant fill the ditch across the street from me b/c I don't own it, and I doubt any neighbor wants to allow me to fill it so cars can park in what used to be his front ditch.

 

I have tons of parking - and its not a problem for me 99.99% of the time, but if a bar were to open up that expects 100 people a night in 60 cars every night, but only have 15 parking spots - then it could be a huge problem - and I am absolutely going to side with the homeowner when that problem arises....They have a legal right to access their driveway.

 

Getting locked in your driveway is not a price you pay for "living in the city"

 

Which I addressed:

 

 

I think that some narrow streets either have their street parking suspended entirely, or only allow it on one side of the street. That, or even certain streets that require a resident tag seem fine to me. Better than putting the onus on the businesses.
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If you deliberately purchased a house on a narrow street bordered by ditches that are clearly too steep to allow cars to pull fully over when parking on a public thoroughfare and then try to access your driveway in a vehicle that is clearly too large for the circumstances then whose fault is that?

That's not the price you pay for "living in the city", it's the price you pay for making some lousy decisions.

 

When I bought the house the street was narrow - but getting into my driveway was not a problem.  Still isn't a problem.  However, last year the new house across the street from me was completed and he (presumably required by the city) dug the ditch deep....when I bought the house I could have parked in his ditch without a problem as it was only a few inches deep....now, its at least 3' deep - something I am guessing the city requires of new construction as my ditch is also quite deep, and so is the ditch of the only other new construction on my block....everyone else has basically no ditch, or one thats only a few inches deep.

 

As to the vehicle being too large for the circumstances - nope - its big but its not too big unless something new changes the current circumstances...I have been blocked in my driveway 1 time where I had to get someone to move their truck (concrete pumping truck)...It was an inconvenience - nothing more.  If it was daily I would address the problem...its not....my previous arguments are for people that are actually having to deal with this problem. 

 

I don't consider any of my choices of house/driveway/street/truck lousy.  Given that Im not rich, and I need a big truck, it was the cheapest thing I could get to commute/work in - I made good decisions that were all based on my current circumstances.  Since I'm moving soon anyway - and there is nothing in the works for bar/resistant anytime soon, I'm not worried about.  The House has appreciated 30+%, the street has improved, the large lot/driveway are an asset, not a liability - so ya - I don't see any lousy decisions on my end - I am merely sympathizing for people who do have to deal with the BS of bar/restaurant parking on their streets... - Its not "the price you pay" to live in the city.  

 

Houston isnt NY - the Heights was a suburb - its now considered the city - but it was never intended to be a parking lot like NY, and it never should be.  That would truly ruin the attractiveness of the neighborhood.  

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Houston's a pedestrian hell because of the commitment to car culture.

Houston is only a pedestrian hell if you belong to the romantised NYC pedestrian mindset that thinks you should be able to walk everywhere. If that is what you desire then you're going to grow old waiting for it to happen here. Move to NYC while you are still young and don't mind the cramped apartment shared by two other room mates.

Most folks here enjoy the autonomy a car gives them, even if that means being stuck in traffic. It's their choice, and they relish having choices.

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Houston is only a pedestrian hell if you belong to the romantised NYC pedestrian mindset that thinks you should be able to walk everywhere. If that is what you desire then you're going to grow old waiting for it to happen here. Move to NYC while you are still young and don't mind the cramped apartment shared by two other room mates.

Most folks here enjoy the autonomy a car gives them, even if that means being stuck in traffic. It's their choice, and they relish having choices.

 

Things are already changing for the better. Passing Council today was a new exemption to the parking requirements allowing businesses to reduce their parking requirements by 10% by trading 1 car space for 4 bike spaces.

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Big Mamou had the 3rd best Gumbo on a 1/2 mile stretch of Studewood...  as much as I wanted to love the place (the owners are very nice people) it just never did it for me.  I appreciated the beignets the most... and if they would have been available all the time I would have went a lot more.  Great location, great building, great attitude, the food just wasn't good enough. 

 

I miss Big Mamou already. Contrary to your thoughts, I always thought their location was a terrible problem. It seemed almost invisible driving past it, the bright lights and traffic of the gas station next door attracted your eyes.  Even worse coming from the north.

I loved their red beans and rice, jambalaya, and a few other items I tried, but started going less and less when their hours started fluctuating. Some of my friends I took there thought the prices were a bit high for what you got. But once they started altering the hours (breakfast/lunch only on some days, Thursday-Sunday lunch only, etc) I figured they were on their last legs. They were nice people, hope they didn't lose too much.

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Things are already changing for the better. Passing Council today was a new exemption to the parking requirements allowing businesses to reduce their parking requirements by 10% by trading 1 car space for 4 bike spaces.

More power to businesses who can reduce their required parking space requirements. However reality is going to dictate that the majority of spaces that will be used by actual bike riders will be at hipster bars, coffee shops, yoga studios. (Or staff) You're not going to see a couple taking their tandem to a $$$+ restaurant in July. This just means more cars in neighborhoods.

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More power to businesses who can reduce their required parking space requirements. However reality is going to dictate that the majority of spaces that will be used by actual bike riders will be at hipster bars, coffee shops, yoga studios. (Or staff) You're not going to see a couple taking their tandem to a $$$+ restaurant in July. This just means more cars in neighborhoods.

I am really tired of the argument that cycling won't happen in Houston because it is hot in the summer. First, riding a bike in the evening during the summer is actually very pleasant. It is the least humid time of day and when you are out of the direct sunlight, it is very pleasant. Second, while people may not like riding three to four months out of the year, the other eight to nine months are wonderful for riding. Third, one of the most bike friendly cities I have ever visited in North America is Montreal. There are well protected bike lanes that go all over the core urban neighborhoods and longer trails like the Lachine canal that take you out to the suburbs completely protected from cars. For at least three months out of the year, there is so much snow and slush around and it is so cold that people do not ride their bicycles anywhere. But that did not stop them from creating an excellent cycling infrastructure that is essential in the dense urban core neighborhoods where parking is very limited.

Lastly, enough with the hipster crap. This is the Heights not Montrose. I see lots of families out biking in the Heights. I actually prefer taking a bike with my kids to go out to eat because it is easier to lock up a few bikes than to try to find parking on White Oak.

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Or put those big rocks between the ditch and the street.

 

I generally find these rocks to be incredibly offensive. Our neighbor has these blocking on-street parking in the part of their frontage not occupied by driveway.  As a result, theirs cars (or their guests' cars) either pull into the driveway outside the gate, blocking the sidewalk, or park in front of our house.  I realize we don't own the street parking in front of our house, but it's kind of dick move to block parking in front of your own house, and expect it to be available in front of someone else's.

 

But in the case where there's a legitimate need for an access easement, it's a reasonable solution.

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I am really tired of the argument that cycling won't happen in Houston because it is hot in the summer. First, riding a bike in the evening during the summer is actually very pleasant. It is the least humid time of day and when you are out of the direct sunlight, it is very pleasant. 

Lastly, enough with the hipster crap. This is the Heights not Montrose. I see lots of families out biking in the Heights. I actually prefer taking a bike with my kids to go out to eat because it is easier to lock up a few bikes than to try to find parking on White Oak.

 

This is not entirely correct. The lowest humidity occurs during times of highest temperature, generally early to mid afternoon. However, the evening humidity is generally still lower than in the morning, and after the sun goes down, the temperature drops as well.

 

Agreed that the Heights is decidedly not hipster, but in many ways Heights residents can be worse. But, I find most inner loop upper income residents to be the same. They want parking for their cars, but don't want parking where they can see it. And, they want to park on your street, but don't want anyone parking on their street. They are very bi-polar in this regard. 

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I am really tired of the argument that cycling won't happen in Houston because it is hot in the summer. First, riding a bike in the evening during the summer is actually very pleasant. It is the least humid time of day and when you are out of the direct sunlight, it is very pleasant. Second, while people may not like riding three to four months out of the year, the other eight to nine months are wonderful for riding. Third, one of the most bike friendly cities I have ever visited in North America is Montreal. There are well protected bike lanes that go all over the core urban neighborhoods and longer trails like the Lachine canal that take you out to the suburbs completely protected from cars. For at least three months out of the year, there is so much snow and slush around and it is so cold that people do not ride their bicycles anywhere. But that did not stop them from creating an excellent cycling infrastructure that is essential in the dense urban core neighborhoods where parking is very limited.

Lastly, enough with the hipster crap. This is the Heights not Montrose. I see lots of families out biking in the Heights. I actually prefer taking a bike with my kids to go out to eat because it is easier to lock up a few bikes than to try to find parking on White Oak.

 

Not my intent to hijack, but since I'm Canadian I thought I'd chime in on the bike thing for a quick second. The best trails I've seen are up there.  Vancouver, Calgary, etc and in areas and climates many reading this thread would argue is a waste.  But if Canada can build a 23,000 km coast to coast hike and bike trail, I think Houston can add a few paths in the city and people will use them. http://tctrail.ca/about-the-trail/

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Or put those big rocks between the ditch and the street.

 

I generally find these rocks to be incredibly offensive. Our neighbor has these blocking on-street parking in the part of their frontage not occupied by driveway.  As a result, theirs cars (or their guests' cars) either pull into the driveway outside the gate, blocking the sidewalk, or park in front of our house.  I realize we don't own the street parking in front of our house, but it's kind of dick move to block parking in front of your own house, and expect it to be available in front of someone else's.

 

But in the case where there's a legitimate need for an access easement, it's a reasonable solution.

 

You can call 311 and have ROW maintenance remove them or at least fine the homeowners. Putting boulders next to the ditch would be like someone with curb and gutter putting permanent orange cones out.  Another version of this are those people who illegally fill up their ditch with rocks to make an unpermited parking pad and then think that means nobody else can park there. A neighbor of mine once called a tow truck and threw a fit that somebody would have the audacity to park in his parking pad! waaaah!

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You can call 311 and have ROW maintenance remove them or at least fine the homeowners. Putting boulders next to the ditch would be like someone with curb and gutter putting permanent orange cones out.  Another version of this are those people who illegally fill up their ditch with rocks to make an unpermited parking pad and then think that means nobody else can park there. A neighbor of mine once called a tow truck and threw a fit that somebody would have the audacity to park in his parking pad! waaaah!

 

We must live on the same street.  I had an across the street neighbor screaming at the top of his lungs that a pizza delivery person parked in front of his house in the ROW that he put rocks over....the guy was there for maybe 2 minutes to walk to my house and deliver a pizza - literally just long enough to cross the street and hand me a pizza...he was irate...

 

I don't have any problems at all with street parking (other than I think its ugly) so long as its not inconveniencing others...Really everything were talking about here is a matter of common courtesy....if people used common sense and were polite and courteous things would be fine...problem is that there are not alot of intelligent people...and the ones who are smart enough to know they are causing a problem, are just too selfish to care.  The 1% of us who pay attention to others are usually the ones that are already being inconvenienced.

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I am really tired of the argument that cycling won't happen in Houston because it is hot in the summer. First, riding a bike in the evening during the summer is actually very pleasant. It is the least humid time of day and when you are out of the direct sunlight, it is very pleasant.

It is, which is why I choose my bike, rather than my car to exercise in the evening. If I want to actually go *somewhere* with more dining options (recall the title of this thread) I fire up the internal-combustion engine so I spend the least amount of time commuting to and from the restaurant.

I know that this modern world is painful for those that only use bikes, or envy NYC or DC's metro system, but I value my time and prefer not to bring a change of cloths with me when dining out.

Now, if we're talking drinks only, then skinny jeans, an ironic t-shirt, and vintage 80's Kaepa's are the perfect way of saying eff-you to the man while you ride your fixie to Antidote and then follow it with a growler at the place you've never heard of. When it comes to weaving on the way home, I'm cool with the double standard/benefit cyclists have.

Despite Historic efforts to price the "riff-raff" out the Heights still has hipsters. Hipsters. Hipsters on your front lawns, blocking the alleys, buying up all the cheap beer, having 11pm band practice in the garage apartment they rent from your neighbor, changing their '83 Renault Alliance CV joints on the street. Hipsters.

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Here's the deal; just because you don't do something doesn't mean that others don't as well.

 

I am typing this as I wait for my date to get ready. We're going to walk to dinner tonight.

 

I've used my bike/feet to get to tons of places since I moved back. Granted, I don't do it in the heat of the summer unless we're day drinking outside and I'm going to be sweating regardless.

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I've used my bike/feet to get to tons of places since I moved back. Granted, I don't do it in the heat of the summer unless we're day drinking outside and I'm going to be sweating regardless.

If you're pounding back drinks outdoors in the summer heat, then you probably should walk home.

I guess when your riding a tandem after drinking it does not matter who the designated pedaler is.

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Here's the deal; just because you don't do something doesn't mean that others don't as well.

 

I am typing this as I wait for my date to get ready. We're going to walk to dinner tonight.

 

I've used my bike/feet to get to tons of places since I moved back. Granted, I don't do it in the heat of the summer unless we're day drinking outside and I'm going to be sweating regardless.

 

I walk to Collinas on 19th from 11th along Nicholson all the time...every time of the year.  Its nice in the evening and I get a Menchi's to go on the way home.  Its a weekly event in my house - the kids love it and I dont have to park.  But at the same time - Collina's is a responsible neighbor - their parking lot does not spill into the neighborhood.  Nobody complains about Collina's being a good neighbor.  At least I have not heard of it.

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I skateboard everywhere in this city.  As long as they have a patio or outdoor seating its all good.  Moon Tower is a nice easy destination while on a board (or bike).  Heck I skated to juice box one time (awesome fruit w/ shaved ice and condensed milk place) over in chinatown (bellair and beltway 8).  There is no doubt that this city is already getting more bikeable... and the more trails they build the better and more used it will get (though cars will always be most peoples choice).  I really enjoy using my board to go to the bar though.  Skating after a drink or 7 is a way better option than driving.

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I skateboard everywhere in this city. As long as they have a patio or outdoor seating its all good. Moon Tower is a nice easy destination while on a board (or bike). Heck I skated to juice box one time (awesome fruit w/ shaved ice and condensed milk place) over in chinatown (bellair and beltway 8). There is no doubt that this city is already getting more bikeable... and the more trails they build the better and more used it will get (though cars will always be most peoples choice). I really enjoy using my board to go to the bar though. Skating after a drink or 7 is a way better option than driving.

My hats off to you. Given the condition of the city streets and my age-related center of gravity shift I would end up being a member of the "Broken" Bones Brigade.

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My hats off to you. Given the condition of the city streets and my age-related center of gravity shift I would end up being a member of the "Broken" Bones Brigade.

 

off topic**

The technology behind skateboards has actually made a huge difference.  Longboards take advantage of this the most (they use bigger wheels) because the biggest advantage nowadays is the advancements in urethane.  New skateboard wheels are made from urethane that is much softer than wheels of old... but at the same time they do not wear out quickly.  My go to board for long treks has very soft 75mm wheels... skateboards of the old days normally had 45-55mm wheels that were hard as rocks.  The big soft wheels allow you to run over sticks, cracks, pinecones, and etc. while also maintaining a longer wheel roll. 

 

 

sorta on topic**

I suspect over the next few years we will see more people using longboards to get to local businesses.  This is part of why I think it would benefit any new restaurant to ensure they have good outdoor seating available, if your already a little hot/sweaty from biking/skating/walking to the restaurant you probably won't mind (or would prefer) sitting outside (provided there is shade and fans).  BB's, Onion/Cedar/Dry Creek, Shepard Park, Cottonwood, Jus' Mac are just a few examples of the types of places that would fit that criteria.

 

 

on topic**

I'm curious of opening timelines for the brewery on Calvacade, Torcy's, Height General Store, TexMex place going in at white oak and studewood, Ruggles.

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Coltivare is seeking a parking variance tomorrow from the planning commission. Long story short, they want to use the parking spaces along the warehouse next door and keep the greenspace next to the building as a garden. The City is stuck on ROW issues again and thinks that the pull in parking spaces along the warehouse should not be used because they do not clear the ROW. Please email the planner Dipti.Mathur@houstontx.gov, and the planning commission pd.planning@houstontx.gov, Marlene.Gafrick@houstontx.gov to voice your support for the variance. If they do not get the variance, they will have to use the greenspace/garden as a parking lot. The parking crush along White Oak is far enough away from this location that there is no reason to be militant on parking for this restaurant.

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For once, I kind of agree. Check out these cars blocking the implied sidewalk. https://maps.google.com/maps?q=3320+White+Oak,+Houston,+TX&ll=29.781527,-95.394147&spn=0.001286,0.001206&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-a&channel=fflb&hnear=3320+White+Oak+Dr,+Houston,+Harris,+Texas+77007&gl=us&t=h&z=20&layer=c&cbll=29.781527,-95.394147&panoid=SL_1MTY8aGs1GCqG9BOv8Q&cbp=12,299.74,,0,6.11

 

Imagining every space full, getting down the sidewalk would be pretty tough.

I personally think street parking all the cars should be fine, but that's considered anathema to Houston's parking planners, so in that context, I'm agreeing with their opinion.

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off topic**

The technology behind skateboards has actually made a huge difference.  Longboards take advantage of this the most (they use bigger wheels) because the biggest advantage nowadays is the advancements in urethane.  New skateboard wheels are made from urethane that is much softer than wheels of old... but at the same time they do not wear out quickly.  My go to board for long treks has very soft 75mm wheels... skateboards of the old days normally had 45-55mm wheels that were hard as rocks.  The big soft wheels allow you to run over sticks, cracks, pinecones, and etc. while also maintaining a longer wheel roll. 

 

Long boards are nothing new.  We had those in the 70s.  Santa Cruz, Sims, etc.  The small wheels was a 90s-00s thing.  Dumb kids.  Kryptonics made 60, 65, and 70mm wheels in the 70s. Orange were soft, blue medium and green hard. 

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For once, I kind of agree. Check out these cars blocking the implied sidewalk. https://maps.google.com/maps?q=3320+White+Oak,+Houston,+TX&ll=29.781527,-95.394147&spn=0.001286,0.001206&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-a&channel=fflb&hnear=3320+White+Oak+Dr,+Houston,+Harris,+Texas+77007&gl=us&t=h&z=20&layer=c&cbll=29.781527,-95.394147&panoid=SL_1MTY8aGs1GCqG9BOv8Q&cbp=12,299.74,,0,6.11

 

Imagining every space full, getting down the sidewalk would be pretty tough.

I personally think street parking all the cars should be fine, but that's considered anathema to Houston's parking planners, so in that context, I'm agreeing with their opinion.

No, there is no problem with pedestrian access. Whoever built the warehouse built a sidewalk along the building. Unless you are incapable of making a 90 degree turn, you will not have any trouble walking by while people are parked in the parking spaces.

This is just the City literally saying "we allowed someone to build these parking spaces in the right of way, but now we won't let you count those parking spaces to meet your parking requirement."

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on topic**

I'm curious of opening timelines for the brewery on Calvacade, Torcy's, Height General Store, TexMex place going in at white oak and studewood, Ruggles.

 

 

Town-in-City (Cavalcade) is requesting a setback variance (15-ft instead of 25), and the current planning commission agenda indicates it will be deferred a 2nd time this week, so it won't see approval before the end of this month.

 

The eastern half of the old Harold's building (HGS) looks to have made significant progress on the demo, but signs of actual construction are not apparent from the outside.

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No, there is no problem with pedestrian access. Whoever built the warehouse built a sidewalk along the building. Unless you are incapable of making a 90 degree turn, you will not have any trouble walking by while people are parked in the parking spaces.

This is just the City literally saying "we allowed someone to build these parking spaces in the right of way, but now we won't let you count those parking spaces to meet your parking requirement."

 

Why isn't the sidewalk on the right of way? Supposing I want to protest the warehouse (not that I ever would, but just supposing) would I be trespassing if I were on the sidewalk, their property?

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Why isn't the sidewalk on the right of way? Supposing I want to protest the warehouse (not that I ever would, but just supposing) would I be trespassing if I were on the sidewalk, their property?

Ask the City. They permitted it long ago. If this really mattered to the City, why haven't they cited the property owner and forced them to fix the sidewalk? The fact of the matter is that without the variance, they are not going to be able to have a nice garden, people will still park in those spots along the warehouse when the surface lot is full and the sidewalk will still be along the building. If you think that is a good thing for the neighborhood and a reasonable way to treat a small business owner who has added a lot of value to the Heights with Revival Market, then that is unfortunate. But, everyone else wants to see a nice garden and not a parking lot next to this restaurant and sees that the City is being unreasonable in refusing to count parking spaces that the City has already approved as parking spaces and failed to enforce the right of way.

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Town-in-City (Cavalcade) is requesting a setback variance (15-ft instead of 25), and the current planning commission agenda indicates it will be deferred a 2nd time this week, so it won't see approval before the end of this month.

 

Thanks to pressure from the community, the City and Town in City have made peace on the variance issue. The deferral is to give Town in City time to have their architect finalize a compromise plan that the City will support for the 15 ft variance.

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I just don't think doubling down on a prior mistake is a good idea. Coltivare knew the city's parking requirements before (8 spaces per 1000 sf), which have also now been relaxed by 10% if Coltivare installs some bike parking.

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I just don't think doubling down on a prior mistake is a good idea. Coltivare knew the city's parking requirements before (8 spaces per 1000 sf), which have also now been relaxed by 10% if Coltivare installs some bike parking.

 

wow.  you'd think they could some how use the revival parking during peak dinner hours (say 7pm on ) or so. 

 

I am amazed that sidewalk access is an issue.  I have seen some of the most bizarre start\stop sidewalks or sidewalks with utility poles crossing through them all over town.  Am amazed that there is anybody looking at that stuff at all.

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Oh, I agree with that entirely. There are light poles dead center on sidewalks in the East End where utility realignment has already occurred for the rail. I've seen several that don't seem ADA compliant to me. The city (or Metro?) is risking a lawsuit, I think.

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Long boards are nothing new.  We had those in the 70s.  Santa Cruz, Sims, etc.  The small wheels was a 90s-00s thing.  Dumb kids.  Kryptonics made 60, 65, and 70mm wheels in the 70s. Orange were soft, blue medium and green hard. 

 

it's the actual formula used in pouring the urethane that is dramitically different.  There is no comparison to old wheels, they are completely inferior. 

 

Wheels were made of clay at one point. 

 

Of course longboards aren't new, but comparing old ones to new  (like foam core wrapped in carbon fiber) is comparing apples to hand grenades.

 

 

I was skating around yesterday and decided to go to happy fatz... forgetting they were closed on tuesday I was crushed! 

 

 

 

 

Also, not sure if many of you knew Art from Stanton's City Bites, he recently passed away and the heights area restaurant scene has truly lost a great person.

 

 

I encourage everyone to go there and get a big burger in the near future, they are now open on sundays!

Edited by SilverJK
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I just don't think doubling down on a prior mistake is a good idea. Coltivare knew the city's parking requirements before (8 spaces per 1000 sf), which have also now been relaxed by 10% if Coltivare installs some bike parking.

There is no doubling down. People who work in the warehouse currently park there and people going to the new restaurant will park there regardless of whether the variance is granted. If the City decides to improve the sidewalks along White Oak (don't hold your breath), they will be able to build across the parking spaces and Coltivare will have to find another lot or get rid of the garden. If someone redevelops the warehouse, the City will require them to build a sidewalk across the parking spaces and Coltivare will have to find replacement parking. But, the only difference between granting the variance and not granting it is a garden v. a parking lot. Building a parking lot will be a major expense for the owners as they will have to dig out a sewer connection for the drainage. Of course, they knew that parking was an issue when they bought it, but that doesn't mean the City should deny a variance in order to enforce a right of way requirement that they have never enforced. But, kicking a small business owner in the pants in order to celebrate form over substance is the kind of thing that keeps people from redeveloping the Heights.

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But, kicking a small business (or home) owner in the pants in order to celebrate form over substance is the kind of thing that keeps people from redeveloping the Heights.

 

Glad you are starting to notice. When you begin opposing these nut-crushing ordinances we'll really be making progress.

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Yeah, be careful s3mh, you're starting to sound like a Historic District opponent.

Sorry. Not taking the bait. Every thread ends up about the historic districts. It is old. And this is apples to oranges.

For those who are not obsessed with arguing about the historic districts, the City has agreed to defer the application to do further study to formulate the staff's recommendation. They will go back before the planning commission on March 28. I hope the Coltivare folks start lobbying the City and the planning commission members heavily. The City planning staff likes to hold their recommendation off until the day before the meeting, making it impossible to lobby the planning commission members to go against the planning commission. With enough time to lobby, you can get the PC to go against the staff (as they did with the new Audi store on Greenbrier and SW Freeway feeder). Hopefully, the City staff will get this worked out and support the variance.

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Here is the email appeal sent around to those on the Revival Market email list:

COLTIVARE NEEDS

YOUR HELP!

The Plea:

As many of you know, we are in the process of opening Coltivare, our interpretation of an Italian-inspired, American, neighborhood restaurant, at the corner of White Oak and Arlington Streets.

Undoubtedly, one of the most unique aspects to Coltivare, is the potential to have a 3,000 square foot, fully-functioning vegetable garden, directly to the East of our building.

From day one, we envisioned the green space as having the potential to become that, but knew we faced a few hurdles with the City of Houston, fulfilling our parking code requirement. We didn't let ourselves get our hopes up just yet.

Many of you have probably noticed a lot of "not much" going on with the construction process. This is because we've been going through the variance process with the City of Houston Planning Department.

The variance that we are seeking is one allowing us to utilize parking lots that we have leased adjacent to Coltivare, as spaces to count towards our code requirement.

Across Arlington Street on the North side of White Oak, sits a warehouse space that has been in existence since 1938, best we can tell. Dating back to the 50's, via Google satellite images, those same spaces have been used for parking. They are used for parking today as they will continue to be used for parking tomorrow. Over the last 80 years, as White Oak's right-of-way has widened, it has slowly encroached on the depth of these spaces. They sit between 15'-16' deep now. The City likes 19'. However, there is another 13' from the back of the spaces to the actual street, leaving plenty of room to maneuver safely. These spaces are already legally being used by the warehouse during they day; we simply want to use them at night.

These spaces are what we are trying to get the Planning Commission to approve regarding our variance. Spaces that are already in existence and being used for parking.

We have historically had a very good relationship with the Planning Commission and do not envy their jobs. Given everything that is thrown at them, they do a phenomenal job keeping the City moving in the right direction. The idea of turning existing green-space into another parking lot does seem counter intuitive to Mayor Parker's green initiatives though.

Regarding our variance, they have afforded the Heights community an opportunity to voice your support in their approving our parking plan.

In a perfect world, we would love for you to inundate their emails with a quick note saying you support our variance to utilize existing parking, rather than turn one of the few green-spaces the community has, into another ugly parking lot.

Contact Planner Dipti Mathur Dipti.Mathur@houstontx.gov

Dipti has been graciously reading through all of these emails, but she needs to hear from you.

Also wouldn't hurt to cc:

pd.planning@houstontx.gov

Marlene.Gafrick@houstontx.gov

We also would like to invite you to the Planning Commission hearing, March 28th, at 2:30pm, to verbally support the variance. We will send a follow up email as that date approaches, with more details.

Thank you all in advance for your support. We at Coltivare look very forward to serving you for years to come, and cannot imagine doing this in another neighborhood in Houston. The Heights is our home too.

Best Regards,

Morgan Weber & Ryan Pera

Owners, Revival Market & Coltivare Houston

Edited by s3mh
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I think I will oppose this change. People will never understand the problem of giving city government power if we keep asking for variances. It would be best for the neighborhood if Coltivaire is forced to play by the same rules the homeowners do.

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  • Highrise Tower changed the title to Restaurant Diversity In The Heights

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