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Seeking Real Estate Investment seminars


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UT Austin might have some seminars that you can attend. Also, if you go to Barnes & Noble and buy some of the more professional real estate investment books, the authors of those books usually have seminars. Some of them might even come to Texas.

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They say you should be able to average 10% a year investing in real estate. Is that before or after you pay the taxes, insurance, repairs and other cost of owning homes?

Who is they? What kind of real estate are they talking about (i.e. rental houses, apartment complexes, retail, office, medical office, warehouse, self-storage, vacant land, etc.)? Where is the real estate located? Building quality? Demographics? Firmographics? How do they expect that you'll finance the acquisition? Or are they talking about development?

There are too many variables and too many components of the realm that comprises 'real estate' to say that 10% is the magic number...much less your magic number.

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I just think the stock market is a better investment if 10% is average on real estate. When you consider all the things that can go wrong with renters and houses. Course real estate you can buy with someone elses money, set it up as a biz and if it doesn't work out you just go bankrupt, get foreclosed on and walk away. Charging people money telling them how to make money in real estate is an even safer way to go.

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I just think the stock market is a better investment if 10% is average on real estate. When you consider all the things that can go wrong with renters and houses. Course real estate you can buy with someone elses money, set it up as a biz and if it doesn't work out you just go bankrupt, get foreclosed on and walk away. Charging people money telling them how to make money in real estate is an even safer way to go.

You can do the same thing by opening up a margin account, but since it is viewed as so risky, many brokerages set limits on how much can be borrowed. In real estate, 80% loan-to-value on an investment acquisition is pretty standard. Anything above 50% in a margin account is basically impossible to come by, even if you're only involved in blue chips.

The thing about real estate that can be so lucrative is that there is asymmetrical information. If you know your ****, you can leverage the acquisition and really cash in on a specialty product or even arbitrage. In contrast, with the stock market, you have to outwit brokers that know (or at least have the ability to know) everything that you do, and then some.

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