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Howard Hughes in Houston


LarryDallas

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Close! The Hughes family home on Yoakum is part of the University of St. Thomas campus.

More info can be found here.

The notable locations in Houston of the Howard Hughes Family:

1404 Crawford: Howard Hughes, Sr., and his pregnant wife lived in a house located within the confines of the present day Toyota Center(believe it or not). The mother was afraid of the mosquitos and moved to Humble to deliver Howard, Jr. in 1905.

McKinney street: The Hughes family lived on McKinney street in Eastwood, but the exact address is debatable.

2nd street & Girard: The original Sharp-Hughes Tool company was located here on present day University of Houston Downtown campus. There is a art/sculpture that depicts the three headed drill bit that Howard, Sr. invented (1909) and patented.

1700 Main street: The Hughes family lived in the Beaconsfield apt/hotel in 1916(room 2A). Howard was 11 years old. The hotel still stands and has been renovated.

3921 Yoakum street: The Hughes family home was built in 1918 and Howard, Jr., spent his teenage years here. The home transferred to the University of St. Thomas in 1953. They currently teach theology out of his house. Howard kept the home so that his aunt could live there after he went to Calfornia in 1925.

1212 Main street(Humble building): Howard Hughes, Sr., died in his office on the 5th floor in 1924.

2525 Washington Avenue(Glenwood cemetery): Howard, Jr., Sr., and his aunt are all buried in a plot long the western edge of the cemetary.

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The notable locations in Houston of the Howard Hughes Family:

1404 Crawford: Howard Hughes, Sr., and his pregnant wife lived in a house located within the confines of the present day Toyota Center(believe it or not). The mother was afraid of the mosquitos and moved to Humble to deliver Howard, Jr. in 1905.

McKinney street: The Hughes family lived on McKinney street in Eastwood, but the exact address is debatable.

2nd street & Girard: The original Sharp-Hughes Tool company was located here on present day University of Houston Downtown campus. There is a art/sculpture that depicts the three headed drill bit that Howard, Sr. invented (1909) and patented.

1700 Main street: The Hughes family lived in the Beaconsfield apt/hotel in 1916(room 2A). Howard was 11 years old. The hotel still stands and has been renovated.

3921 Yoakum street: The Hughes family home was built in 1918 and Howard, Jr., spent his teenage years here. The home transferred to the University of St. Thomas in 1953. They currently teach theology out of his house. Howard kept the home so that his aunt could live there after he went to Calfornia in 1925.

1212 Main street(Humble building): Howard Hughes, Sr., died in his office on the 5th floor in 1924.

2525 Washington Avenue(Glenwood cemetery): Howard, Jr., Sr., and his aunt are all buried in a plot long the western edge of the cemetery.

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I can see that, as you're up to FOUR posts now with the exact same information: two new threads and two replies to previous posts. :lol:

Let me give you an unofficial welcome to HAIF... Welcome! You only need to post something once. We'll see it. :)

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I can see that, as you're up to FOUR posts now with the exact same information: two new threads and two replies to previous posts. :lol:

Let me give you an unofficial welcome to HAIF... Welcome! You only need to post something once. We'll see it. :)

awwww......new haifers are so cute when their numbers are low. that have that new haif smell. :)

Welcome to the system.

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Welcome to The HAIF.

Most of the regulars use the "View New Posts" feature, so they saw all of your posts about where Howard Hughes lived come out in one big blurp.

Yeah, I was wondering if I was having Deja Vu or if it was just the beer.

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I saw a television program on Howard Hughes recently. It told of his secluded childhood with his mother, her paranoia (he later inherited), his mental issues. It was really sad, that he was so intelligent, but had mental problems that went undiagnosed & untreated. Several documentary style moving films were featured within the show, displayed how Howard Hughes disorders were apparent from his mannerisms. One example was how he tugged at his pants leg during an interview. The injuries he suffered in the plane crashes hastened his mental collapse. The TV program also said that anyone else would have been dead long before he died, with all the physical problems and chronic pain.

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I saw a television program on Howard Hughes recently. It told of his secluded childhood with his mother, her paranoia (he later inherited), his mental issues. It was really sad, that he was so intelligent, but had mental problems that went undiagnosed & untreated. Several documentary style moving films were featured within the show, displayed how Howard Hughes disorders were apparent from his mannerisms. One example was how he tugged at his pants leg during an interview. The injuries he suffered in the plane crashes hastened his mental collapse. The TV program also said that anyone else would have been dead long before he died, with all the physical problems and chronic pain.

The Hollywood plane crash in 1946 was the CENTRAL event in Hughes life. The bogus movie, 'The Aviator', incorrectly overstated his OCD symptoms as a young man - his problems were caused by drugs which he took from 1946 on(age 40).

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The Hollywood plane crash in 1946 was the CENTRAL event in Hughes life. The bogus movie, 'The Aviator', incorrectly overstated his OCD symptoms as a young man - his problems were caused by drugs which he took from 1946 on(age 40).

Pain meds are a quick fix, but have huge side-affects, after a while you need more to achieve the same results. I understood and agree, as well, that the head injury was the main spiral. Hollywood most always takes extreme liberties when telling stories on-screen, to suit the time frame they have to work with.

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Pain meds are a quick fix, but have huge side-affects, after a while you need more to achieve the same results. I understood and agree, as well, that the head injury was the main spiral. Hollywood most always takes extreme liberties when telling stories on-screen, to suit the time frame they have to work with.

True. People should never get their history from Hollywood. In Hughes case, there was no need to rewrite history for the sake of drama...Hughes real life was amazing enough.

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I saw a television program on Howard Hughes recently. It told of his secluded childhood with his mother, her paranoia (he later inherited), his mental issues. It was really sad, that he was so intelligent, but had mental problems that went undiagnosed & untreated. Several documentary style moving films were featured within the show, displayed how Howard Hughes disorders were apparent from his mannerisms. One example was how he tugged at his pants leg during an interview. The injuries he suffered in the plane crashes hastened his mental collapse. The TV program also said that anyone else would have been dead long before he died, with all the physical problems and chronic pain.

What station had this program? Remember the name of it?

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1. Hughes's family was at Beaconfield at (1700?) Main but for a short time. One story is that he was actually born in Humble, some others say Houston. The story is that his birth records were falsified. According to Howard Hughes: The Secret Life, his birthdate is even innacurate; Should be August 24th instead of December 24th. As difficult as this man was in so many areas of his life, leave it to him to not have an easily identifiable birthday.

2. The "Hughes House" is on Yoakum and currently houses Religious Studies for USThomas. After he "fled" to Los Angeles, he begged his aunt and uncle to stay in the house and paid for an addition to the house to keep them there.

3. HH married Ella Rice at a church on Texas Ave. downtown, across the street from the current Magnolia Hotel.

4. His closest relative is William Lummis, who is President of the Houston Country Club and resides in Tanglewood (an easily recognizable modern home very near the HCC).

5. Buried at Glenwood Cemetery by George Lewis & Sons on Washington Ave.

6. Hobby Airport was once named after HH until the name was taken away - I'd love to hear why this happened.

7. Apparently used to eat at the "Pig Stand" on Washington Ave. Cannot verify that, unfortunately.

8. Does anyone know if Hughes Tool still possesses any of that furniture they wanted to sell?

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What station had this program? Remember the name of it?

Sorry that I can't be sure, but I think it could be this one, from the description it gives...I got the impression that it came out after The Aviator, to try to explain the whole story. A&E, History channel or Biography would be the third guess (we watch a lot of those). I had never seen the documentary shots/interview of him standing outside like this program had in it, he was fidgeting with his pant leg. It started out with scenes (reinactments) of how his mother would obsessively wash him, and how he was isolated. Really sad. Had the usual govt. documentary film included later. Link:

http://www.filmmonthly.com/Video/Articles/...wardHughes.html

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6. Hobby Airport was once named after HH until the name was taken away - I'd love to hear why this happened.

In July 1938, after setting a new speed record flying his Lockheed 14 Super Electra around the world, Howard Hughes flew to Houston for a 3 day celebration.

During a banquet at the Rice Hotel, the City announced that the recently opened Houston Municipal Airport would be renamed the Howard Hughes Municipal Airport.

A few months later, it was learned that the airport would not be eligible for Federal funding if it was named after a living person.

So the name was changed back to Houston Municipal Airport, and that was the end of that.

Edited by FilioScotia
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1. Hughes's family was at Beaconfield at (1700?) Main but for a short time. One story is that he was actually born in Humble, some others say Houston. The story is that his birth records were falsified. According to Howard Hughes: The Secret Life, his birthdate is even innacurate; Should be August 24th instead of December 24th. As difficult as this man was in so many areas of his life, leave it to him to not have an easily identifiable birthday.

2. The "Hughes House" is on Yoakum and currently houses Religious Studies for USThomas. After he "fled" to Los Angeles, he begged his aunt and uncle to stay in the house and paid for an addition to the house to keep them there.

3. HH married Ella Rice at a church on Texas Ave. downtown, across the street from the current Magnolia Hotel.

4. His closest relative is William Lummis, who is President of the Houston Country Club and resides in Tanglewood (an easily recognizable modern home very near the HCC).

5. Buried at Glenwood Cemetery by George Lewis & Sons on Washington Ave.

6. Hobby Airport was once named after HH until the name was taken away - I'd love to hear why this happened.

7. Apparently used to eat at the "Pig Stand" on Washington Ave. Cannot verify that, unfortunately.

8. Does anyone know if Hughes Tool still possesses any of that furniture they wanted to sell?

-----

JWW, read my initial post for addresses.

1) 'Hughes' by Richard Hack is a more accurate book than 'Hughes - The Secret Life' by Charles Higham. I read both of them...Hack investigated deeper than Higham.

Howard was born in Humble on September 24, 1905.

2) They currently teach Theology out of Hughes house on Yoakum.

3) Miss Ella Rice and Howard Hughes married at 7:00 P.M., June 1st, 1925, at 10 Remington Lane.

10 Remington Lane is adjacent to Sunset blvd at Rice University(expensive).

7) The Pig Stand was built in 1921...so it is possible, but I don't know.

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In July 1938, after setting a new speed record flying his Lockheed 14 Super Electra around the world, Howard Hughes flew to Houston for a 3 day celebration.

During a banquet at the Rice Hotel, the City announced that the recently opened Houston Municipal Airport would be renamed the Howard Hughes Municipal Airport.

A few months later, it was learned that the airport would not be eligible for Federal funding if it was named after a living person.

So the name was changed back to Houston Municipal Airport, and that was the end of that.

So that 'rule' was changed before Intercontinental took George Bush's name, I assume? Where did you read about the statute regarding federal funding for airports with living names? I read it was due to opposition from people who preferred posthumous naming ?

Edited by JWW
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So that 'rule' was changed before Intercontinental took George Bush's name, I assume? Where did you read about the statute regarding federal funding for airports with living names? I read it was due to opposition from people who preferred posthumous naming ?

Policies are changed all the time. I'm willing to believe -- that in 1938 -- the government had a firm policy against naming things after living people. That policy has obviously changed.

Count me as one of those who doesn't like putting names of living people on things that will be around long after they're gone. I've never believed it's a good idea, but, the government doesn't ask me for advice anymore.

Anyway, I got my information from the website created and maintained by the Houston Aeronautical Heritage Society, the group that's restoring the airport's original 1940 terminal building.

http://www.1940airterminal.com/

Click on "Houston's Aviation History Timeline" on the left side of the page.

And while I'm on the subject, I'm asking everybody here to check out that website. The Society is raffling off an antique 1947 Cessna 140 this weekend. There's still time to get in on it. And if you've never been to that wonderful old building, you owe it to yourself to check out a real piece of real Houston history.

Edited by FilioScotia
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  • 5 months later...
Close! The Hughes family home on Yoakum is part of the University of St. Thomas campus.

More info can be found here.

When the aviator movie was out in 2005?, I believe the Houston Chronicle did an interview with one of Howard Hughes neighbors and class mate at school. I believe her name is Mrs. Pressler and she would have been in her early 90s.

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