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How Dallas Is Getting One Over On Us...


heights_yankee

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Being new to the architecture thing, I've been doing some reading on the Brownstone designs mainly found in New York. Imo they are terrific and have great character. With the movement toward higher density living and throwback home buying, why isn't someone attempting to resurect these (Brownstone) designs.

Who knows, maybe I'm the only one who likes them <_<

Have you seen the townhomes (condos?) near S. Post Oak and Hidalgo (sorry, I don't know the name of the building)? Just south of Williams Tower.

They resemble some of the 19th century townhouses one might see in Brooklyn Heights or Boston.

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I know some of you here have been reading this as well...

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McKee Street Bridge

Group: Members

Posts: 32

Joined: Tuesday, June 7th, 2005

From: Woodland Heights

Member No.: 894

From a neighbourhood BB. Don't know of this house specifically, so it may have been an unsalvageable dump, but I'm surprised it was so easy to demo a place on the "National Register of Historic Places".

"1801 Ashland is gone.

Both Channel 13 and The Chronicle sent photographers.

Despite being listed on the National Register of Historic Places, it was not legally protected from demolition. The question that lingers is this - why wasn't anyone given a chance to move the building or salvage major parts of it?

The owner, Ryan Hildebrand, writes that he will put a "top drawer" restaurant there. We hear it will have a Victorian theme.

The owner was (and may still be) the chef at Vic and Anthony's, which is owned by the Landry Group.

ABOUT THE HOUSE:

Listed Individually on the National Register of Historic Places in 1983 - Site No. 90. McDonald House. 1801 Ashland. 1907 1900--. Two story frame house; combination roof with projecting gable bay on front with two gable ends; attached double gallery curves to both sides, supported by fluted columns; squared balusters, double French door to upstairs gallery; three sided bay window on lower gallery; single front entrance with transom; windows with one-over-one lights. Home of John E. McDonald, a real estate investor in the Heights; he purchased this property from O. M. Carter in 1907 and built this fine home, complying with the deed restrictions that prohibited construction of buildings costing less than $2000. It later served as the home of A.J. Foyt's grandfather. The area near 19th and Ashland was already established as the commercial center for the Heights; thus this house was in a prime spot from the beginning."

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So, the guy who demolished this historic building has told people essentially "Well, don't worry. We are going to build a new Victorian style building for our Victorian themed restaurant."

I know I am not the only one who thinks this is just plain STUPID. But in relation to this thread, it makes me wonder: They have already pi$$ed off 99% of Heights residents by doing this. So, instead of using it as an opportunity to do something different and creative, it sounds to me like they've probably contracted someone like Allegro to build it. Therefore it will look like every other building Allegro has built (except their own offices, which I like) and just annoy people all the more...

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I am posting this with a glimmer of hope some developer will read it....

We are having a contruction boom in Houston as far as my relatively uninformed eye can see. There are buildings going up everywhere and you know what? They stink! They all look the same.

Everytime I open a design magazine (and, granted, I read modern design mags) there is a story about some cool new highrise or townhome project or single fam re-do in DALLAS that people are raving about. They're getting spreads and huge amounts of coverage that just scream "wow- look how great and progressive and urban DALLAS is..." C'mon poeple, we all know this is a load of crap!!! I lived in Big D for 6 years. It's terrible... Yet it continues to outshine Houston in the national conscience. :angry2:

There is a gigantic complex of apartments going up on Allen Pkwy, right behind that cool warehouse that I would buy if I won the lottery. ^_^ Anyway, they've started the exterior finish. Faux stucco. Ugh! There is so much potential every time a new complex goes up, but everytime it's the same, generic crap.

Is there anything we can do?

Dallas does seem to have a lot of "new urban" projects going up, but then the style of New Urbanism is just a trendy movement among "hip" people. "Hip" people are simply those that keep pace with all the pop culture fads...they're the people that jump right aboard any broad trend, adopting it as their own to impress the neighbors. As far as I, a Houston resident, is concerned, a hip is the flesh that is attached to a femur. Nothing more.

Is urbanity really just a measure of density and walkability or is it something more? I would submit to you that urbanity is more associated with the aggregate influence of an independent and bohemian culture than with streets lined with mid-rise buildings. In that sense, Montrose, essentially a suburb in terms of density, is as urban as Uptown Dallas. Does a "lifestyle center" full of tenants like Pottery Barn and Banana Republic truely urban, or should that title fall to a run down single-tenant indie theater or the Menil Collection's neighborhood?

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Have you seen the townhomes (condos?) near S. Post Oak and Hidalgo (sorry, I don't know the name of the building)? Just south of Williams Tower.

They resemble some of the 19th century townhouses one might see in Brooklyn Heights or Boston.

Two words: Randall Davis

Although I appreciate his renovations of old loft buildings in Houston and Galveston and his new Cosmopolitan proposal project looks nice.

Edited by WesternGulf
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Is urbanity really just a measure of density and walkability or is it something more? I would submit to you that urbanity is more associated with the aggregate influence of an independent and bohemian culture than with streets lined with mid-rise buildings. In that sense, Montrose, essentially a suburb in terms of density, is as urban as Uptown Dallas. Does a "lifestyle center" full of tenants like Pottery Barn and Banana Republic truely urban, or should that title fall to a run down single-tenant indie theater or the Menil Collection's neighborhood?

I do agree about the concept of urbanity, but at this point in Houston a "lifestyle center" is better than more of the same, same, same IF the architecture is interesting and unique (unlike the lemon in Monstrose- you know the one behind the KFC).

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