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Web link to UHD announcement:

UHD.edu

New Building rendering due to be completed Summer of 2007, and ready for classes fall 2007

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Location X marks the spot:

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Old rendering for college of business. this building was going to be built near the Buffalo Bayou sandwiched in by I-45 off ramp that turns into Travis street and Louisiana St which flow onto the I-10. this building will not be built any time soon.

ml1aoj.jpg

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Great... thanks so much for posting.

For those of you that were skeptical of METRO's announcement of a new Central (intermodal) Station, the expansion of UH Downtown will now be a neighbor to the land for that project. Throw in Hardy Yards, as well as some of the artist warehouses in the area (DiverseWorks, Fotofest), and you've got some interesting and fun dynamics emerging here. As I mentioned in the METRO thread, this area will look radically different - in a very positive way - in the next five to six years.

Edited by firstngoal
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Big improvement. That will be one compact university. Doesn't UHD have more students than TSU now?

UHD has about 12,000 students give or take a few. But it's not the "typical" university, there is no student housing on campus and a large majority are older adults furthering thei studies in evening / night classes.

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Nice. The location is brilliant.

Looks like another Spaw Glass building to complement the other new building on Main on the other side of the bayou.

I hope they don't put up those corney "Universtiy District" flags that you see on Franklin.

Everything is a district nowadays.

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Nice. The location is brilliant.

Looks like another Spaw Glass building to complement the other new building on Main on the other side of the bayou.

I hope they don't put up those corney "Universtiy District" flags that you see on Franklin.

Everything is a district nowadays.

Ditto. Those flags are overkill. Skyline District, Minute Maid Park District, Toyota Center District, Theater District, The new Main Street, George R Brown, next thing you know Houston Pavilions District. :wacko:

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Great news! The Intermodal Center location is looking better and better.

While Houston has changed incredibly over the past 5-10 years, it is looking like the changes over the coming 5-10 years will be even more amazing.

As an aside, I've always wondered why so many Houstonians seem so averse to attaching names to areas/neighborhoods. Names can help provide the much-sought-after "sense of place" and help to add a little bit of soul to a city.

Edited by Houston19514
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As an aside, I've always wondered why so many Houstonians seem so averse to attaching names to areas/neighborhoods. Names can help provide the much-sought-after "sense of place" and help to add a little bit of soul to a city.

Sure, neighborhoods should have a name, but I refer to our "downtown" as DOWNTOWN. I understand the Theatre District moniker...it fits. But the rest of the names downtown seem artificial. Do we really need to subdivide it into Skyline District, MMP District, Toyota Center District? Where are the "Surface Parking District" flags? What about "Greyhound Bus Station District"?

Houstonians aren't anti-neighborhood names...we're just against the manufactured names (SoDo ring a bell? Has that one caught on yet?)

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Does anyone know if UHD has plans to build housing downtown for some of its students?

I don't know the answer to that one. But I have an opinion...

It seems to me that most UHD students are part-time students, and not the type that would live on campus. They've got lives somewhere else...jobs, homes, families, etc. So I'm not sure that UHD is the type of school that would be well-served by student housing. At least not at this point in time.

UH's central campus has some of the same demographics, but probably not to the same extent. At the central campus, 27% of the undergrads are part-time students, and the mean age of those undergrads is 22.8 years old...older than your typical undergraduate college student. Since UH (main campus) serves a lot of non-traditional students, on-campus housing is much lower. I think UH (main campus) has something like 5,000 students living on campus (out of a total enrollment of over 35,000).

Checking UH-D's website, somewhere between 50% - 88% of UH-D's undergrads are part-time students (depending on whether you use the 12-hr or 15-hr mark as the part-time/full-time boundary.) I don't think there will be much demand for on-campus housing at UH-D.

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Does anyone know if UHD has plans to build housing downtown for some of its students?

Not likely. UHD fits a specific need. It's for people going back to school long after graduation, not 18 yo HS grads. If you want the classic college experience (such as dorms/frats/etc.) UH Central is 5 miles away.

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As an aside, I've always wondered why so many Houstonians seem so averse to attaching names to areas/neighborhoods. Names can help provide the much-sought-after "sense of place" and help to add a little bit of soul to a city.

Becuase they are artifical. NoHo is a textbook example.

And if I can spit across the strett, and hit another "District", what's point?

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^ I hear there's a new city ordinance that prohibits spitting across district lines..... B)

The micro-districts do seem very manufactured. Eventually, all areas develop their own names on their own if they have some sort of personality and there's no way anyone is going to start calling each 3 block area something different.

Great to see more new development in " that N. Main area".

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Not likely. UHD fits a specific need. It's for people going back to school long after graduation, not 18 yo HS grads. If you want the classic college experience (such as dorms/frats/etc.) UH Central is 5 miles away.

That may be so, but in the mornings and daytime it is crawling with college age kids. Most look to be part-timers and stay-at-home types, so maybe dorms are not needed for them either.

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That may be so, but in the mornings and daytime it is crawling with college age kids. Most look to be part-timers and stay-at-home types, so maybe dorms are not needed for them either.

I go to UHD. About a year ago I had a conversation with one of the administrators for the school. It escapes me what his title was, but anyhow, he said that they are heavily recruiting freshmen students from local high schools. They want to become a more traditional four year University with dorms and all that "jazz." His word not mine.

UHD started as a trade school, for the purposes of providing companies in the CBD a reasonably close alternative for continuing education for their employees.

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As an aside, I've always wondered why so many Houstonians seem so averse to attaching names to areas/neighborhoods. Names can help provide the much-sought-after "sense of place" and help to add a little bit of soul to a city.

Part of the blame must be placed on local television news, which fails to make these distinctions.

It seems that everything happens "in Southwest Houston" or "in Northeast Houston". Very seldom are distinct neighborhoods mentioned. Whether this is through ignorance, laziness or a desire to appeal to the lowest common denominator is anyone's guess.

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This building will run up to Naylor Street. METRO owns the land north of Naylor, up to where Hardy Yards begin. Metro also owns the land on the west side of Main Street, up to Daly. Hardy Yards extends to Burnett. Once all three projects are completed, that will be one of the most impressive strtches of Main Street. This will surely trigger redevelopment north of these blocks, as the tunnel will be removed, opening that neighborhood to the southern portion. Additionally, UHD police will patrol the area, as well as METRO police and HPD. It will be one of the best patrolled areas of the city.

All of this development will increase pressure to do something with the I-10 overpass. Combined with the Buffalo Bayou improvements, this could really be nice.

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I go to UHD. About a year ago I had a conversation with one of the administrators for the school. It escapes me what his title was, but anyhow, he said that they are heavily recruiting freshmen students from local high schools. They want to become a more traditional four year University with dorms and all that "jazz." His word not mine.

UHD started as a trade school, for the purposes of providing companies in the CBD a reasonably close alternative for continuing education for their employees.

It would be great it some day UHD resembled Georgia Tech just outside downtown Altanta. I always wondered how they can have a real university downtown but it hasn't worked in Houston.

Also, I like the "district" names, it gives some character to each of these areas and is impressive to visitors.

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The 'master plan' is for UH to move "upmarket" in terms of admission standards, and offload less academically rigorous programs to UHD. That's why I expect UH Central to shrink, and become leaner and more focused, and for UHD to continue to grow. This is all from my anonymous sources high up in the UH system B)

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Sounds like an excellent plan to me.

I agree. I think UH's Central Campus will benefit in the long run from this move. It will improve the image as well as the profile of the students entering the school, and therefore it will increase the value of our degrees. If full-time student enrollment increases, it would follow that campus life would benefit, which is good for the city and just good all around for UH.

I imagine that College World Series, Final Fours and BCS Championships won't be far behind! :D;):huh::mellow::o:(:blink::wacko:

Edited by Original Timmy Chan's
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I agree. I think UH's Central Campus will benefit in the long run from this move. It will improve the image as well as the profile of the students entering the school, and therefore it will increase the value of our degrees. If full-time student enrollment increases, it would follow that campus life would benefit, which is good for the city and just good all around for UH.

I imagine that College World Series, Final Fours and BCS Championships won't be far behind! :D;):huh::mellow::o:(:blink::wacko:

You are right about the negative perception but only one thing. The University of Houston and The University of Houston Downtown are two separate entities. UH Downtown is part of the UH system, but in no way is it the same school. Their partner ship is one of convenience, meaning that they merge there utilities only when it is convenient. They both have different mascots UH has a Cougar and UHD has a Gator. As a student at UHD you can not take classes at UH Central with out first applying, and then registering, and so on.

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Anyone know what the combined student populations are for the 3 UH system campuses? (Houston only, not including Victoria)

The University of Houston System has a total enrollment of over 56,000 students. What a lot of people don't realize (as was mentioned earlier) is that each campus is a separate university, same relationship as UTEP or UT-Pan Am has to UT-Austin, or TAMU-Corpus Christi or TAMU-Galveston has to TAMU-College Station.

University of Houston - over 35,000 students (most ethnically diverse research university in the US, by the way); only doctoral program in the UH System.

UH-Downtown - 11,500 students; offers bachelors/graduate programs

UH-Clear Lake - 7,600 students; offers bachelors/graduate/Master's programs

UH-Victoria - 2,500 students; offers bachelors and graduate programs

So, to answer your original question, there are about 53,500 UH students from all UH System schools in Houston, excluding UH-Victoria.

Edited by Original Timmy Chan's
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The University of Houston System has a total enrollment of over 56,000 students. What a lot of people don't realize (as was mentioned earlier) is that each campus is a separate university, same relationship as UTEP or UT-Pan Am has to UT-Austin, or TAMU-Corpus Christi or TAMU-Galveston has to TAMU-College Station.

University of Houston - over 35,000 students (most ethnically diverse research university in the US, by the way); only doctoral program in the UH System.

UH-Downtown - 11,500 students; offers bachelors/graduate programs

UH-Clear Lake - 7,600 students; offers bachelors/graduate/Master's programs

UH-Victoria - 2,500 students; offers bachelors and graduate programs

So, to answer your original question, there are about 53,500 UH students from all UH System schools in Houston, excluding UH-Victoria.

Ahhh, UT-Pan AM. That brings back old memories. It will always be simply "Pan Am" to me (pre-UT-assimilation). I was raised in McAllen till about 20 years ago, when I moved to Houston. Pan Am was basically the only univeristy south of Corpus/Kingsville, and for the most part, still is.

By the way, March 2, 2006, is the exact 20 year aniversary of me moving to Houston...I will have spent half of my life here on that date. I Still havent lost the excitement of living in this great city. I think come March 2nd I will celebrate the event!!

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The University of Houston System has a total enrollment of over 56,000 students. What a lot of people don't realize (as was mentioned earlier) is that each campus is a separate university, same relationship as UTEP or UT-Pan Am has to UT-Austin, or TAMU-Corpus Christi or TAMU-Galveston has to TAMU-College Station.

University of Houston - over 35,000 students (most ethnically diverse research university in the US, by the way); only doctoral program in the UH System.

UH-Downtown - 11,500 students; offers bachelors/graduate programs

UH-Clear Lake - 7,600 students; offers bachelors/graduate/Master's programs

UH-Victoria - 2,500 students; offers bachelors and graduate programs

So, to answer your original question, there are about 53,500 UH students from all UH System schools in Houston, excluding UH-Victoria.

What about the Cinco Ranch and University Center at the Woodlands? What are their populations?

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  • Highrise Tower changed the title to University of Houston Downtown College of Business

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