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City Development Around The World


shasta

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West Dallas, West Clay, & West Gray are going to have quite the 10 year transformation, in terms of High rises and urban infill.

Autry Park and Regent Square recently completed their early phases and still have many tall buildings to add.

The Driscoll was recently completed with GLR.

This project caps the end of West Clay @ Waugh plus TONS of potential with the shopping center site fronting West Gray.

The end of West Dallas @ Waugh is getting a  new multi Family project.

I would think the Kroger on West Gray site also prime for another high profile urban project.

I've often thought about how Houston is developing and which cities are comparable.

It is not like the typical American City that focuses on one center business district, instead it is developing more like International cities.

This may have been a crazy take a decade or two ago but Houston is actually starting to develop like London. the are adding mid/high rises, or clusters of mid/high rises, in the middle of infill.

I'm sure there are other non-American examples.

 

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17 hours ago, shasta said:

This may have been a crazy take a decade or two ago but Houston is actually starting to develop like London. the are adding mid/high rises, or clusters of mid/high rises, in the middle of infill.

😆 By London, surely you must be thinking LA.

16 hours ago, BEES?! said:

I’ve always felt like Houston develops more like an Asian city: not one central core, but many. I think it’s really been to our advantage, and I’m really interested to see what pops up next. 

If by Asian city, you mean city with a lot of Asian neighborhoods, OK.  LA yet again!

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3 hours ago, mattyt36 said:

😆 By London, surely you must be thinking LA.

If by Asian city, you mean city with a lot of Asian neighborhoods, OK.  LA yet again!

We were initially designed to copy a LA type of a city but the recent development of clusters a tall buildings outside of Downtown, Med Center, Uptown, Greenway, etc. is similar to a London type of city where they pop up randomly. This is happening on Allen Parkway (the 3 West Streets), Upper Kirby,  and Montrose.

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1 hour ago, shasta said:

We were initially designed to copy a LA type of a city but the recent development of clusters a tall buildings outside of Downtown, Med Center, Uptown, Greenway, etc. is similar to a London type of city where they pop up randomly. This is happening on Allen Parkway (the 3 West Streets), Upper Kirby,  and Montrose.

OK buddy.  Have you even been to LA?

You're describing a lot of cities there, including LA.

Name any city of size without multiple activity centers.  If your only distinction is our buildings are taller as if that's the distinguishing development characteristic, I suppose that's possible, but I think even that's a stretch.  Take a look at the urban infrastructure (the "inital design" you're referring to, if you will)--spoler alert--it's still LA!  Large developments popping up in multiple locations within a 5-mile radius, in particular at the intersection of large arterials (it ain't "random"!!!!!), doesn't change that . . . in fact it makes it more like LA!

Houston is just now getting these large-scale mixed-use development.  We are probably a good 10 years behind other comparable cities in this regard.  And thus far, the results seem decidedly, er, mixed (pun!) . . . take a look at the vacant commercial space in the Regent Square and Autry Park developments.

To say Houston is developing like London is beyond absurd.  What is Seattle developing like then?  How about Atlanta?  Austin?  Maybe, maybe, maybe I will give you Houston is developing like Toronto, albeit probably 20 years behind.

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14 minutes ago, mattyt36 said:

OK buddy.  Have you even been to LA?

You're describing a lot of cities there, including LA.

Name any city of size without multiple activity centers.  If your only distinction is our buildings are taller as if that's the distinguishing development characteristic, I suppose that's possible, but I think even that's a stretch.  Take a look at the urban infrastructure (the "inital design" you're referring to, if you will)--spoler alert--it's still LA!  Large developments popping up in multiple locations within a 5-mile radius, in particular at the intersection of large arterials (it ain't "random"!!!!!), doesn't change that . . . in fact it makes it more like LA!

Houston is just now getting these large-scale mixed-use development.  We are probably a good 10 years behind other comparable cities in this regard.  And thus far, the results seem decidedly, er, mixed (pun!) . . . take a look at the vacant commercial space in the Regent Square and Autry Park developments.

To say Houston is developing like London is beyond absurd.  What is Seattle developing like then?  How about Atlanta?  Austin?  Maybe, maybe, maybe I will give you Houston is developing like Toronto, albeit probably 20 years behind.

Yes, I've been to both Los Angeles and London as well as many other cities, including Austin, Atlanta, & Seattle mentioned in your diatribe. Haven't made it to Toronto yet so I'll send you a report when I do.

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28 minutes ago, shasta said:

Yes, I've been to both Los Angeles and London as well as many other cities, including Austin, Atlanta, & Seattle mentioned in your diatribe. Haven't made it to Toronto yet so I'll send you a report when I do.

Must have been quite the, er, "trip" if you were walking around Piccadilly Circus and seeing, um, GreenStreet.  That 17th century street design, no grid and all . . . WOWZA!!!!!  I definitely DO eagerly await a trip report from Toronto!

tedlassogifs-when-harry-met-sally.gif

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22 hours ago, mattyt36 said:

Must have been quite the, er, "trip" if you were walking around Piccadilly Circus and seeing, um, GreenStreet.  That 17th century street design, no grid and all . . . WOWZA!!!!!  I definitely DO eagerly await a trip report from Toronto!

tedlassogifs-when-harry-met-sally.gif

I specifically mentioned in  "the areas OUTSIDE of downtown, Med Center, Uptown".

FYI- GreenStreet is in downtown Houston

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1 hour ago, shasta said:

I specifically mentioned in  "the areas OUTSIDE of downtown, Med Center, Uptown".

FYI- GreenStreet is in downtown Houston

Ah, then, my mistake!  Makes total sense now . . . how could I not see something so clear?  Houston is indeed just like London, especially when it comes to areas outside of downtown.  I have zero doubt that if you ask any of the nearly 20K native born Brits who live here now, they'll say, yep, they're developing so similarly, it's almost like they didn't leave home!  Maybe we can get the AIA Houston Chapter to jointly sponsor an exhibition with the British Consulate exploring the vastly similar urban fabric of these twin cities.  We can put aerial photos side by side and people will see, "Look, there's a tall building over there!  And there's one over there!  And another group over there!  It's like they're the same!  There certainly aren't any other cities in the world that can lay claim to this wildly unique development feature."

(It's always fascinating to see what hills people will die on.  I never would've guessed it would be claiming that Houston was developing like London, but this site never disappoints.  At least I did learn GreenStreet was downtown and therefore was not like Piccadilly Circus, had been admittedly confused about that one.)

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47 minutes ago, mattyt36 said:

Ah, then, my mistake!  Makes total sense now . . . how could I not see something so clear?  Houston is indeed just like London, especially when it comes to areas outside of downtown.  I have zero doubt that if you ask any of the nearly 20K native born Brits who live here now, they'll say, yep, they're developing so similarly, it's almost like they didn't leave home!  Maybe we can get the AIA Houston Chapter to jointly sponsor an exhibition with the British Consulate exploring the vastly similar urban fabric of these twin cities.  We can put aerial photos side by side and people will see, "Look, there's a tall building over there!  And there's one over there!  And another group over there!  It's like they're the same!  There certainly aren't any other cities in the world that can lay claim to this wildly unique development feature."

(It's always fascinating to see what hills people will die on.  I never would've guessed it would be claiming that Houston was developing like London, but this site never disappoints.  At least I did learn GreenStreet was downtown and therefore was not like Piccadilly Circus, had been admittedly confused about that one.)

Maybe if you are posting on a Houston City forum, you should focus on understanding Houston better.

And don't be dramatic, no one is saying Houston IS London.

They are saying the non zoning, no master plan approach leads to more of a London style city (with random clusters of high rises)  than a rigid zoned American City with a definite boundary between a  high rise district and lower height districts...or even another European example like Paris with a defined Business District (la Defense).

Houston AND London..do NOT follow those planning rules but nice trying to  project your comprehension of what you want us to think.

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3 hours ago, mattyt36 said:

Ah, then, my mistake!  Makes total sense now . . . how could I not see something so clear?  Houston is indeed just like London, especially when it comes to areas outside of downtown.  I have zero doubt that if you ask any of the nearly 20K native born Brits who live here now, they'll say, yep, they're developing so similarly, it's almost like they didn't leave home!  Maybe we can get the AIA Houston Chapter to jointly sponsor an exhibition with the British Consulate exploring the vastly similar urban fabric of these twin cities.  We can put aerial photos side by side and people will see, "Look, there's a tall building over there!  And there's one over there!  And another group over there!  It's like they're the same!  There certainly aren't any other cities in the world that can lay claim to this wildly unique development feature."

(It's always fascinating to see what hills people will die on.  I never would've guessed it would be claiming that Houston was developing like London, but this site never disappoints.  At least I did learn GreenStreet was downtown and therefore was not like Piccadilly Circus, had been admittedly confused about that one.)

It'll make more sense if you go to the Red Lion and drink gin and tonic until your vision starts to blur. 😛

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17 hours ago, shasta said:

They are saying the non zoning, no master plan approach leads to more of a London style city (with random clusters of high rises)  than a rigid zoned American City with a definite boundary between a  high rise district and lower height districts...or even another European example like Paris with a defined Business District (la Defense).

Houston AND London..do NOT follow those planning rules but nice trying to  project your comprehension of what you want us to think.

So . . . you think London has no zoning, eh?

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In A Robotic voice to appease mattyt36:

LONDON IS A PERFECT CENTRAL NODE CITY WITH A DEFINED DOWNTOWN DISTRICT IN THE CENTER...THERE ARE ZERO SKYSCRAPERS OUTSIDE OF THAT NODE.

IT IS IN NO WAY SIMILAR TO THE ORGANIC WAY HOUSTON IS DEVELOPING WHICH SPROUTS SKYSCRAPERS ANYWHERE.

ANYONE WHO COMPARES THE TWO CITIES IS DELUSIONAL

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3 hours ago, mattyt36 said:

So . . . you think London has no zoning, eh?

The UK doesn't really have zoning as such, and that includes London. 

48 minutes ago, shasta said:

In A Robotic voice to appease mattyt36:

LONDON IS A PERFECT CENTRAL NODE CITY WITH A DEFINED DOWNTOWN DISTRICT IN THE CENTER...THERE ARE ZERO SKYSCRAPERS OUTSIDE OF THAT NODE.

IT IS IN NO WAY SIMILAR TO THE ORGANIC WAY HOUSTON IS DEVELOPING WHICH SPROUTS SKYSCRAPERS ANYWHERE.

ANYONE WHO COMPARES THE TWO CITIES IS DELUSIONAL

I am assuming this is sarcasm, since London has any number of high rise buildings outside what passes for "Downtown", which isn't really the same as a US downtown, ie the City of London.

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1 hour ago, shasta said:

In A Robotic voice to appease mattyt36:

LONDON IS A PERFECT CENTRAL NODE CITY WITH A DEFINED DOWNTOWN DISTRICT IN THE CENTER...THERE ARE ZERO SKYSCRAPERS OUTSIDE OF THAT NODE.

IT IS IN NO WAY SIMILAR TO THE ORGANIC WAY HOUSTON IS DEVELOPING WHICH SPROUTS SKYSCRAPERS ANYWHERE.

ANYONE WHO COMPARES THE TWO CITIES IS DELUSIONAL

@shasta, buddy, no need to be so sensitive.

This began with you and your claim that Houston was "developing like London."  There was no clarification that such a statement was "aspirational," or "perhaps a bit of an exaggeration," or you were "half-kidding."  Quite the contrary, you dug in!

After a lot of back and forth, I think it's accurate to say that the only reason you think that is because London has tall buildings in scattered places.  I mean, OK . . . but, man.  How absolutely vacuous of an observation.  You might as well say Houston is like London because we have multiple airports, too.  Seriously, brother, what major cities can you not make a similar observation about?  I mean if you want to go on and on about loose land use restrictions, why not pick any major city in Latin America?  London?!

Let's talk some more . . . I've obviously got lots to learn.

1 hour ago, Ross said:

The UK doesn't really have zoning as such, and that includes London. 

It may not have US-style zoning, per se, but if you don't think the permitting process is wayyyyyyyyyyy more complex than Houston, I'd say you and Shasta probably have a good deal in common.

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58 minutes ago, mattyt36 said:

 

It may not have US-style zoning, per se, but if you don't think the permitting process is wayyyyyyyyyyy more complex than Houston, I'd say you and Shasta probably have a good deal in common.

I've lived in London. I've worked with people from the UK for all of my career. I am reasonably familiar with what they go through to build something.. The permitting process there is far different than here, but if you can convince the planning authorities, you can build almost anything.

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2 hours ago, Ross said:

The UK doesn't really have zoning as such, and that includes London. 

I am assuming this is sarcasm, since London has any number of high rise buildings outside what passes for "Downtown", which isn't really the same as a US downtown, ie the City of London.

100% Sarcasm to troll mattyt36

1 hour ago, mattyt36 said:

@shasta, buddy, no need to be so sensitive.

This began with you and your claim that Houston was "developing like London."  There was no clarification that such a statement was "aspirational," or "perhaps a bit of an exaggeration," or you were "half-kidding."  Quite the contrary, you dug in!

After a lot of back and forth, I think it's accurate to say that the only reason you think that is because London has tall buildings in scattered places.  I mean, OK . . . but, man.  How absolutely vacuous of an observation.  You might as well say Houston is like London because we have multiple airports, too.  Seriously, brother, what major cities can you not make a similar observation about?  I mean if you want to go on and on about loose land use restrictions, why not pick any major city in Latin America?  London?!

Let's talk some more . . . I've obviously got lots to learn.

It may not have US-style zoning, per se, but if you don't think the permitting process is wayyyyyyyyyyy more complex than Houston, I'd say you and Shasta probably have a good deal in common.

only talking about the high rises in random places and I did mention there are multiple "non 'American cities" that are more similar to HOW Housron is developing.

Please take your blood pressure medicine now.

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On 10/31/2022 at 4:29 PM, shasta said:

This may have been a crazy take a decade or two ago but Houston is actually starting to develop like London. the are adding mid/high rises, or clusters of mid/high rises, in the middle of infill.

I'm sure there are other non-American examples.

reading comprehension...mattyt36

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4 hours ago, Ross said:

I've lived in London. I've worked with people from the UK for all of my career. I am reasonably familiar with what they go through to build something.. The permitting process there is far different than here, but if you can convince the planning authorities, you can build almost anything.

“If you can convince people who have power to let you do something, they’ll let you do something.”

That is what we call a truism, @Ross.

4 hours ago, shasta said:

reading comprehension...mattyt36

And it’s still a crazy take. Especially considering London two decades ago. It’s like your sequencing is reversed. London developing like Houston, well that’d be at least a mildly interesting and novel take.

 

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