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Levit Green: Life Science Mixed-Use District By Hines


TheNiche

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Is cost the only reason so many Texas highrises are reinforced concrete structures? I'm from NYC and almost everything there is made of steel beams (not just the supertalls)? Something like Downtown's Texas Tower would almost certainly be a steel skeleton in the northeast.

It's a real question. I just don't have the experience to hazard a guess.

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My oversimplified understanding: Cost of labor vs. cost of materials. 

In areas where labor is expensive, steel is used. In areas where labor is cheap, concrete is used. Basically because, especially when dealing with formwork, concrete can be much more labor-intensive. 

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10 hours ago, Texasota said:

My oversimplified understanding: Cost of labor vs. cost of materials. 

In areas where labor is expensive, steel is used. In areas where labor is cheap, concrete is used. Basically because, especially when dealing with formwork, concrete can be much more labor-intensive. 

Texas is also a major concrete supplier and the northeast is a major supplier of steel. Regional economics and supply chains have a hand in this difference I would assume. 

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

This replat seems very positive... I recall hearing that if Hines leased ~50% of Building 1, that they'd kick off Buildings 2 & 3.

I wonder if we'll see a major tenant announcement in the next several weeks...  Fingers crossed!

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3 hours ago, hindesky said:

From the article:

“Hines is working on designing the second building in the complex, although it has not set a timeline for breaking ground. Additional buildings will follow to meet market demand, Mooz said.”

 

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Topping out story in the Biz Journal.  "Hines is already planning the next phase of Levit Green’s development.  In a few weeks, the firm will break ground on Levit Green Boulevard, a key access point running through the complex. Hines and HOK are also already working on the design for the second building on the site."

https://www.bizjournals.com/houston/news/2022/05/20/hines-topping-out-levit-green.html

Levit Green Boulevard project on CivCast.

https://www.civcastusa.com/project/62322f42b739faa9ba635714/summary

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On 5/20/2022 at 2:59 PM, houstontexasjack said:

From the article:

“Hines is working on designing the second building in the complex, although it has not set a timeline for breaking ground. Additional buildings will follow to meet market demand, Mooz said.”

 

"Correction: This story has been updated to reflect that Hines has not yet hired an architecture firm for the second building. The architecture firm HOK designed the first building."

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On 5/20/2022 at 9:10 PM, strickn said:

Wish it weren't a Westchase office vibe all over again

Fair, only counter is that this type of design is what these companies know and are familiar with. Plus, that rendering is more lush and full of trees than anything on Westchase. 

Given their propensity to highlight access to public transit, the boulevard will probably will be pedestrian/bike friendly one would think. For projects like this, a little downtown Bagby street treatment should be in the cards.

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On 6/15/2020 at 9:30 PM, Lux said:

Synergism or competition with TMC3?  The references to Kendall Square in Cambridge, Mass. and Mission Bay in San Francisco are lifted directly from the TMC3 playbook.  An amalgam of life science clusters from 288 to the TMC would be a beautiful thing, and it’s going to take massive CRE Life Sciences investments, in addition to TMC3, for Houston to rise by leaps and bounds in the U.S. Life Science cluster rankings (JLL, CBRE, etc.).  Thoughts?

Two years on, I still think it will be impossible for us to rival those regions without the financial industry legacy tailwind that made it advantageous for them to develop as clusters to begin with.  And with no more backing than our area has, it might be better spent developing a cluster that is suited to our regional culture, rather than the most superheated (competitive but overpriced, where you rise the least in the rankings for the greatest table stakes) industry in the nation's economy.  But when I have to eat crow, then, to quote H Town Man, it will taste just fine.  And if our value play attracts a lot more people from around the world, provides careers that develop local talent without having to move away, and of course beats Dallas, then it will be hard to argue that our timing was wrong.  

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