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Studemont Junction Multifamily


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IronTiger, are you referring to the Kmart at 1431 West 20th? Because it opened earlier than the 70s, I believe it was opened in the early to mid 60s actually.

Any idea what will become of Arne's with all this new development going on around it? The old girl is beginning to stick out like a sore thumb.

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Any idea what will become of Arne's with all this new development going on around it? The old girl is beginning to stick out like a sore thumb.

 

I agree Arne's is in jeopardy because of the increasing value of the land but wouldn't it be a pity to loose the place. Architecturally the building is a cipher but the stuff inside and the way it is piled in there is a hoot. I've bought everything from chew toys for my dog to Cinderella themed plates, napkins, and table decorations for my daughter's 4th birthday party to a 6 quart pressure cooker for my kitchen (for a fraction of the price at a department store, BTW) at Arne's. My wife just got a new dog and bought all kinds of accessories for the pooch there for half what they would have cost at P--co.

 

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Not disagreeing with you that not every plot needs to be mixed use, full of towers, blah blah...Trust me, I think the constant cry for mixed use on this site is way excessive (and irritating at times). I'm just saying that taking a huge parcel of land like this (Grocer's Supply) and throwing in a retail development with seas of head-in parking kind of sucks and I would hope for at least a slightly more urban, pedestrian model in an area that's experiencing pretty rapid growth. But I know these developers do their due diligence (and have figured out what will work best for their bottom line $$) and have the right to put up whatever they want. I'm just hoping that the owners of the tile plant have a better model in mind. 

 

 

The problem lies in the fact that they ARE large parcels of land.  We'd be much more likely to end up with dense, urban development if these parcels were divided up into chunks from 1/10 to 1/2 acres with a street grid overlaid and platted for 5-ft setbacks.  Individual buyers could then mix use to their hearts' content: commercial, retail, single-family, small multi-family, small vertical mixed-use, etc.

 

Big chunks of land end up getting big boxes and big parking lots because it's 20 times easier to lease 60,000 s.f. at a time than 3000 s.f. at a time.

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I believe Arne's owns the land.  They have done a decent job of beating back the tax man without having to pay a law firm $150k to sue the county.  The store still prints money.  Every time I go there, the cash registers are screaming along.  People moving inside the loop will shop there for kids birthday parties, Halloween/Christmas supplies and pet stuff.  There are still plenty of Spanish speakers inside the loop to buy the Quinceanera stuff.  It is such a Houston institution and still relevant commercially that I think they can hang on to the location as long as they want. 

 

The main problem with Katyville is that it is an inefficient use of very scarce land.  When you underbuild, you cause inflation in real estate prices as land becomes more and more scarce without meeting demand.  The Walmart and Target properties could have been built up with an additional1,000 multifamily units and still had the same retail square footage.  But when they were developed, no one foresaw the current demand.  So, now there is again a big opportunity as the 1st Ward de-industrializes.  Developers can make good money strip malling up these properties, but their short term gain will result in long term pain for inner loop real estate. 

 

Also, the 1st Ward is truly a diamond in the rough.  The stretch of Washington Ave between Sawyer and Downtown has the potential to be the best stretch of restaurants/bars/retail and residential in all of Houston.  There is plenty of land for parking.  It is close enough to downtown that you can get lunch and after work business.  It is right off of the bayou and can attract lots of residential development.  But if every big tract ends up with a couple of strip malls on it, the momentum to redevelop the 1st Ward will not be as strong as it could be.

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290 & Beltway 8 ,90A & West Junction ,I-59/69,Sugarland, I-10/Channelview & Beltway 8 ,I-45 would be ideal locations for a bigger Grocer's Supply warehouse. Grocery retail is rapidly growing as the city expands meaning more jobs . It would create more variety in produce , dry foods , specialty foods and poultry . Being directly on a interstate would be good for local delivery traffic and arrival delivery traffic . Being located near freight rail would be essential due to refrigeration and container traffic importing huge quantities of perisheable items by rail . Rail to dock would be utilized quickly especially if it is being constructed near a SIT or Intermodal Classification yard . Food will spoil or expire if not kept in refrigeration or quickly shipped directly to the store especially poultry and dairy .

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290 & Beltway 8 ,90A & West Junction ,I-59/69,Sugarland, I-10/Channelview & Beltway 8 ,I-45 would be ideal locations for a bigger Grocer's Supply warehouse. Grocery retail is rapidly growing as the city expands meaning more jobs . It would create more variety in produce , dry foods , specialty foods and poultry . Being directly on a interstate would be good for local delivery traffic and arrival delivery traffic . Being located near freight rail would be essential due to refrigeration and container traffic importing huge quantities of perisheable items by rail . Rail to dock would be utilized quickly especially if it is being constructed near a SIT or Intermodal Classification yard . Food will spoil or expire if not kept in refrigeration or quickly shipped directly to the store especially poultry and dairy .

 

Not sure what your point is.  Grocers Supply has already selected their new location.  Pinto Business Park on the southwest corner of Beltway 8 and Interstate 45 North.

 

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  • 2 months later...

Forget the light, how tall will they have to build to have a 400 unit multifamily building in the lot to the west?

It should be tall, this area should not be built out with single story buildings. It should not be a sea of single story shopping centers with parking lots. Should be multi leveled buildings with parking garages.

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That light is extremely unlikely to approved.  While there isn't a law, there are design requirements which state that new signals should be spaced at least 1/4 mile away from existing signals. 

 

 

Both the  walmart light and the Target light are 1/10 a mile from the I-10 lights (according to google maps). 

 

The Center street light is 300 ft from the Washington light on Yale. 

 

Perhaps the second one is too old to qualify, but the first ones are pretty new.

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It should be tall, this area should not be built out with single story buildings. It should not be a sea of single story shopping centers with parking lots. Should be multi leveled buildings with parking garages.

 

I agree 100%.  My point is that the foot print for the proposed 400 unit multifamily project looks to be way too small to do the usual Houston wrap 5-6 story apartment complex.  I am not even sure a 20-25 story highrise would be tall enough.  I am just wondering whether someone is really planning to do 400 units?  Or are they planning on acquiring more land?  Or are they really going to do a highrise there? 

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Both the  walmart light and the Target light are 1/10 a mile from the I-10 lights (according to google maps). 

 

The Center street light is 300 ft from the Washington light on Yale. 

 

Perhaps the second one is too old to qualify, but the first ones are pretty new.

 

True. Looking closer, this particular design requirement speaks more to mid-block signals.  The Walmart and Target ones are located at existing streets and are therefore ok with the requirements. Since this newly proposed signal is at an existing street Summer St I guess I could see it getting approved also. However if they had built this one on Summer St before the Kroger light, the Kroger light probably wouldn't have been approved because it is mid-block.

 

I reread the signal design requirements and it uses words like "avoid" and "should" so they probably have a lot of free range to do what they want.

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I agree Arne's is in jeopardy because of the increasing value of the land but wouldn't it be a pity to loose the place. Architecturally the building is a cipher but the stuff inside and the way it is piled in there is a hoot. I've bought everything from chew toys for my dog to Cinderella themed plates, napkins, and table decorations for my daughter's 4th birthday party to a 6 quart pressure cooker for my kitchen (for a fraction of the price at a department store, BTW) at Arne's. My wife just got a new dog and bought all kinds of accessories for the pooch there for half what they would have cost at P--co.

 

 

Im very fond of that old building. The old wooden floors in the back section are nice. So is the ghost sign on the southern exterior wall. Hope it survives the gentrification intact. 

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  • 3 months later...

 

I'm also not optimistic about the Tarkett site, given its feeder road access and its location between Kroger and Target. There's a reason this area was industrial, squeezed in between a freeway and a railroad. When you remove the industry and add a feeder road, you tend to get feeder-road development.

 

 

 

Sold. Story here.

 

 

A Houston retail developer has won a bid to purchase 21 acres just west of downtown, giving the buyer a rare opportunity to remake a large parcel of urban land.
 
Gulf Coast Commercial Group, which builds mostly suburban shopping centers, is expected to close on the property in June. It is still determining plans for the site, just south of Interstate 10 between Sawyer and Studemont streets.

 

 

 

...

 

Egan gave few details about the developer's planning process for the property or potential tenants but said multiple options will be considered. That could include a mixed-use project with perhaps retail, residential and office space.
 
At this point, Gulf Coast is considering developing the entire project itself as opposed to selling off parcels. It may, however, bring in another company with mixed-use expertise to work with on the site.
 
While much of the company's development is suburban, it is familiar with this close-in area. It had acquired a site along Studemont nearby where Kroger recently built a store. Some of its other recent developments include Kroger-anchored centers in Kingwood, Cypress and Baytown.

 

 

 

This site is sandwiched between the Studemont Kroger and the Sawyer Target. Access to the feeder road is poor, with the main access via Summer St.

 

If this were developed together with the Kroger site, there would have been an opportunity to run a street grid between Studemont and Olive streets. As an isolated site, it might make sense as mid-rise commercial/office with some limited retail included.

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Sold. Story here.

 

This site is sandwiched between the Studemont Kroger and the Sawyer Target. Access to the feeder road is poor, with the main access via Summer St.

 

If this were developed together with the Kroger site, there would have been an opportunity to run a street grid between Studemont and Olive streets. As an isolated site, it might make sense as mid-rise commercial/office with some limited retail included.

 

It's being talked about here:  http://www.houstonarchitecture.com/haif/topic/31776-21-acre-industrial-site-west-of-downtown/

Edited by HoustonMidtown
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Was this the same sight where the street was sold to Grocers?  If I remember correctly, at that time I believe they argued they needed it for their business operation.  It seems they probably needed that land connection to make the place more marketable to developers! 

 

The Heights Mercantile proposal could actually work very nicely in this location, as opposed to 7th/Heights.

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Was this the same sight where the street was sold to Grocers?  If I remember correctly, at that time I believe they argued they needed it for their business operation.  It seems they probably needed that land connection to make the place more marketable to developers! 

 

The Heights Mercantile proposal could actually work very nicely in this location, as opposed to 7th/Heights.

 

Yes, lets put a walk-able style development in a place where you can barely even get to by car, let alone by foot.  Good plan.

 

I wouldn't mind if they tore down the Kroger and put a half way decent replacement in.

Edited by jstigall
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The Heights Mercantile proposal could actually work very nicely in this location, as opposed to 7th/Heights.

 

There is so much wrong with this it is hilarious.  

 

The only thing I can give you is I would not be surprised by whatever development that does go in there, will most likely have "Heights" in the title somewhere.

 

"Oaks of Heights River Boulevard Tarkett Vinyl Heights -  A south Heights establishment"

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A big mixed use project would work well here.  The property has access to the hike and bike path on the NE corner.  It is an easy walk up to the restaurants and bars on White Oak.  There is already a large apartment complex in the Sawyer Heights development and another is planned for the Studemont Junction project across the street.  So, some residential density could push more redevelopment of the surrounding industrial sites.  The more the area is turned into Katyville, the less interested people will be in doing big projects to redevelop 1st ward. 

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  • 2 months later...
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  • 3 weeks later...

Washington Heights Mixed-Use Finally Underway

 

A hotly anticipated mixed-use project in the Washington Heights is finally moving forward.

 

Demolition has begun on a 280,000-square-foot refrigerated warehouse on 15 acres on Studemont Street south of Interstate 10, which was purchased in late 2013 by Houston-based firms Capcor Partners and Kaplan Management.

 

Demolition began roughly 30 days ago and should wrap up in around 30 to 45 days, said Josh Aruh, managing partner at Capcor. Houston-based M.G. Excavators Inc. is completing the excavation. Plans call for a mixed-use project, dubbed Studemont Junction, which will be composed of up to 400 upscale apartments, as well as retail such as grocers, restaurants and health care.

 

Groundbreaking on a 44,000-square-foot Memorial Hermann Health Systemconvenient care center began Feb. 16, Aruh said, and that should be complete before the end of the year.

 

The developer for Studemont Junction is Edifis Group, a separate company owned by Aruh. Shaw MacIntyre, vice president of Houston-based Streetwise Retail Advisors, which is handling the leasing for Studemont Junction, said the project should be complete around early 2017.

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Its funny because I was just in this area today and I was like why the hell don't they make this area more pedestrian friendly... it has some elements of that but man why doesn't this city go crazy with laying sidewalks? Like consistent sidewalks with the same width from downtown and everywhere expanding from the cities core. If you added more pedestrian friendly areas for people to simply cross the damn street, you'll get a denser city with higher quality. Instead all these developments are half ass, with sidewalks to nowhere or that end out of nowhere and so much landscaping that it becomes hard to maintain all that crap. Instead if you made everything simple and just have all sidewalks come to the edge of the curb, you would find a nicer city with less maintenance. I just don't get it. And all these lots that are empty or overgrown, man fence that crap off. Is the city that strapped for money that they can't section off eyesore lots? 

Edited by j_cuevas713
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13 hours ago, j_cuevas713 said:

Its funny because I was just in this area today and I was like why the hell don't they make this area more pedestrian friendly... it has some elements of that but man why doesn't this city go crazy with laying sidewalks? Like consistent sidewalks with the same width from downtown and everywhere expanding from the cities core. If you added more pedestrian friendly areas for people to simply cross the damn street, you'll get a denser city with higher quality. Instead all these developments are half ass, with sidewalks to nowhere or that end out of nowhere and so much landscaping that it becomes hard to maintain all that crap. Instead if you made everything simple and just have all sidewalks come to the edge of the curb, you would find a nicer city with less maintenance. I just don't get it. And all these lots that are empty or overgrown, man fence that crap off. Is the city that strapped for money that they can't section off eyesore lots? 

 

It's largely because there's nowhere to walk from. As these large tracts became available, starting with the Target several years ago, instead of extending the street grid into these formerly industrial areas, they were/are being developed as standalone big-box centers. 

 

Imagine what kind of neighborhood would emerge if the entire area bound by Houston Ave, I-10, Studemont and Washington was laid out as a street grid with lots (of various sizes) sold off piecemeal, some for retail, some for multifamily, some for single family. You'd have a walkable neighborhood (with a built-in transit right-of-way) within minutes of downtown. Instead we'll get 4-6 large commercial developments, each with their own large surface parking lot.

 

 

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2 hours ago, Angostura said:

 

It's largely because there's nowhere to walk from. As these large tracts became available, starting with the Target several years ago, instead of extending the street grid into these formerly industrial areas, they were/are being developed as standalone big-box centers. 

 

Imagine what kind of neighborhood would emerge if the entire area bound by Houston Ave, I-10, Studemont and Washington was laid out as a street grid with lots (of various sizes) sold off piecemeal, some for retail, some for multifamily, some for single family. You'd have a walkable neighborhood (with a built-in transit right-of-way) within minutes of downtown. Instead we'll get 4-6 large commercial developments, each with their own large surface parking lot.

 

 

And I totally get that, but even if an area is not on a grid, why can't the city at least develop it to meet the needs of the average walker? 

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18 hours ago, j_cuevas713 said:

Its funny because I was just in this area today and I was like why the hell don't they make this area more pedestrian friendly... it has some elements of that but man why doesn't this city go crazy with laying sidewalks? Like consistent sidewalks with the same width from downtown and everywhere expanding from the cities core. If you added more pedestrian friendly areas for people to simply cross the damn street, you'll get a denser city with higher quality. Instead all these developments are half ass, with sidewalks to nowhere or that end out of nowhere and so much landscaping that it becomes hard to maintain all that crap. Instead if you made everything simple and just have all sidewalks come to the edge of the curb, you would find a nicer city with less maintenance. I just don't get it. And all these lots that are empty or overgrown, man fence that crap off. Is the city that strapped for money that they can't section off eyesore lots? 

Does the city build or maintain any sidewalks? Around my house they've all been built by homeowners or businesses. The only time you get new or updated sidewalks is when the city forces a developer to build them. 

 

Edit: The Shepherd drive drainage project is putting in new sidewalks and fixing old ones so I guess there are at least some publicly funded sidewalks.

Edited by jgriff
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Just now, jgriff said:

Does the city build or maintain any sidewalks? Around my house they've all been built by homeowners or businesses. The only time you get new or updated sidewalks is when the city forces a developer to build them. 

Yeah I know but the city pump so much money downtown and then neglects the neighborhoods around it. Why doesn't the city just take over all infrastructure. If business owners have to create their own sidewalk, then all you're gonna get is a bunch of patchwork sidewalks trying to fit together. 

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Things are improving a lot in the city, but there is still a tremendous amount of pro-car bias in public works and safety.  Residents in the Heights have been screaming for some pedestrian protection where the hike and bike path crosses Yale and W 11th.  Thanks to Trammel Crow agreeing to pay for it, the city finally gave in and put in a TUCAN signal at Yale and the hike and bike path (still has not been activated).  But the city resisted because there were no reports of accidents and the traffic counts did not justify it. 

The Walmart/Sprouts developments are another example.  The city gave the developers 380 cash for infrastructure improvements, but the "upgrades" were crap.  The city required wider sidewalks, but just let the developers pave over the grassy strips between the sidewalk and the street.  Trees in the right of way were removed and mitigated with trees above the grade separation by the train bridge.  And after a couple of years, there is still no sidewalk between the Yale St. Bridge and Koehler on the west side of Yale. 

When the City runs the show, they can do nice things, like the improvements on Navigation.  But when it is just developers working directly with the city, there is endless deference to the developer and little vigilance for pedestrian issues.

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5 hours ago, j_cuevas713 said:

And I totally get that, but even if an area is not on a grid, why can't the city at least develop it to meet the needs of the average walker? 

Be a little hard for the City to develop that as a grid, given the property was privately owned for the most part. Unless you think it's OK for the City to force a developer to put in a grid, rather than what the developer thinks will actually sell.

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13 minutes ago, Ross said:

Be a little hard for the City to develop that as a grid, given the property was privately owned for the most part. Unless you think it's OK for the City to force a developer to put in a grid, rather than what the developer thinks will actually sell.

No I'm not saying that nor am I saying it needs to be a grid. What I am saying is that when the city approves a particular development, they need to fully consider how it interacts with pedestrians. And unless the developer can meet those needs, then the project should be postponed, etc. The problem is every project is approved. Developers seem to run this city and the city does little to create a standard for development. 

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  • Highrise Tower changed the title to Studemont Junction Multifamily

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