Jump to content

Studemont Junction Multifamily


Urbannizer

Recommended Posts

Quote
Houston developers will build a mixed-use project, including upscale apartment and retail components, on a 15-acre tract of desirable that is close in to downtown, replacing a large produce warehouse that occupied the space for decades.

 

Capcor Partners and Kaplan Management, which develop retail and residential properties, bought the land this week from Houston-based Grocers Supply, which has occupied the site at the corner of Studemont and Interstate-10 for 42 years.

 

The developers did not disclose the land sale price.

 

Grocers Supply, a Houston-based wholesale supplier for independent grocery stores in Texas and Oklahoma, will remain in the location until its new facility is completed within the next two years. Jim Arnold, vice president of real estate at Grocers Supply, said the company has property under contract for the replacement site, but does not yet own the land. The company has not yet announced its new location.

 

Josh Aruh of Capcor, which specializes in retail developments, said it's rare to find such a large piece of land in the Inner Loop and the new project will make a "big footprint" on the area.

 

"There is tremendous, continuous demand in this sub-market," Aruh said. "We believe the scarcity of such a large, contiguous tract so close to downtown Houston, the Heights and entertainment districts is primed for a strong multifamily component. And with frontage near I-10, this property is ideally suited for retail. The size of the tract invites many possible other uses and users that we are currently exploring."

 

Aruh said he has already discussed possibilities for the property, including grocers, cinemas, restaurants and several big box retailers. The developers also are working with the city to expand a road to split the property and reduce traffic, he said.

 

Michael Kaplan of Kaplan Management, which specializes in multifamily developments, said he hopes to include up to 400 high-end apartments, on the land, on top of the retail and commercial uses, to meet the demand for housing in the area.

 

When Grocers Supply put its property up for sale, several firms submitted offers. Kaplan said he believes his group was chosen, in part, because they were willing to be flexible and allow the company to stay on site until its new building was completed.

 

"It's exceedingly unusual to find such a piece of property like this," Kaplan said. "We are excited about developing this."

 

Ed Wulfe, chairman and CEO of retail development and brokerage firm Wulfe & Co., said as Houston becomes more dense and urban that more and more warehouses will be converted into residential and commercial properties.

 

"We are changing land-use patterns," Wulfe said. "Now, the need is greater and the market is stronger. Warehouses can only command so much economic benefit."

 

He said the Grocers Supply location is an area, between the Heights and Montrose, is ripe for development, both for mulitfamily and retail.

 

"That area is really coming to fruition," he said.

 

http://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/real-estate/article/Grocers-Supply-warehouse-on-Interstate-10-to-5079374.php?cmpid=btfpm

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It looks like it's Hicks Road that would be doing the splitting, as it seems that they own the property across the street near the railroad (Hicks Street doesn't seem to very good demarcations between the property and the road--no sidewalks, ROW, or curbs.

 

Was this the original GSC building before they built that big one that the railroad spur leads to?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Im not sure if there is already a topic for this.....new mixed use development in the planning stages across the street from Studemont Krogers

 

http://swamplot.com/grocers-supply-sale-will-supply-15-acres-for-apartments-shops-across-from-studemont-kroger/2013-12-20/

 

Also article in Chron (subscription needed to read the full text)

http://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/real-estate/article/Upscale-apartments-to-go-on-warehouse-site-near-5079374.php

 

 

Edited by HoustonMidtown
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 months later...

This would be the greatest thing. I don't care how much of suburbia this reminds people. To me, this is revitalization. I don't see people complaining about all the shopping centers near 59 around Buffalo Speedway. I live close to this development and, in my opinion, it would be fantastic to have a movie theater that I can just ride my bike to instead of having to drive down to the Edwards at the Marqee. The huge problem that I actually see is for Studemont. It can't even handle the current traffic so I don't see how it can handle this development.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This would be the greatest thing. I don't care how much of suburbia this reminds people. To me, this is revitalization. I don't see people complaining about all the shopping centers near 59 around Buffalo Speedway. I live close to this development and, in my opinion, it would be fantastic to have a movie theater that I can just ride my bike to instead of having to drive down to the Edwards at the Marqee. The huge problem that I actually see is for Studemont. It can't even handle the current traffic so I don't see how it can handle this development.

 

I agree that another, more traditional movie theater inside the loop would be very nice. We basically have Edwards and nothing else. There is the Sundance film center downtown, and there will be that luxury version of Alamo Draft House opening up at the River Oaks district.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very interesting. I suppose it's possible that the railroad spur that leads straight into the warehouse at Holcombe might be abandoned? (Too bad: I would love to see them demolish the expansion of GSC and build some sort of commuter line on the ROW back to downtown--but the light rail being built there as well kind of limits that)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree that another, more traditional movie theater inside the loop would be very nice. We basically have Edwards and nothing else. There is the Sundance film center downtown, and there will be that luxury version of Alamo Draft House opening up at the River Oaks district.

 

Well, you'll also have a real Alamo Drafthouse at Reagent Square, but that's still years away.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Well there could be future apartments in the plan.  Me, I've never quite understood the importance of mixed use.  It seems that sometimes "mixed use" gets tossed around like magic words.  

 

mixed use = likely more activity at more times of day on the same piece of land = more urban/interesting environment

 

In a nutshell.

 

That said, this location in the middle of Katyville was not likely to be a very urban development, just given what's around it. I think Washington Avenue is about the only street around there that could support urban mixed use.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's funny that I'm apparently the only person that thinks this project is great in taking over another warehouse. Let me tell you why...

 

I've been a suburbanite nearly all my life. I first lived in Spring and then moved to Pearland. Then about 2 years ago, I moved to the Woodland Heights area which, at the time from my suburban perspective, felt like it had nothing but the Target and its associated shopping centers. I felt I had to drive far just to go to Chipotle, for example... the nearest one was near Shepherd and San Felipe. It was quite common for me to have to drive to Memorial City to get what I need. But it seems like the inner city is becoming favorable to pull people away from the endless sprawls of Katy and Sugarland and bring the suburban amenities that sometimes the innercity needs. I'm actually quite glad we have a new Krogers and Walmart now. And all the other food places that have come here such as Which Wich, Chic-fil-a, and Chipotle definitely feel like a plus. I honestly think the negative Katy-ville label is a little absurd... I don't see anyone coming up with a cute name for the even more suburban feel of the Northline Commons area at I-45 and E. Crosstimbers.

 

I certainly understand people's frustrations here that it's not some giant mixed-use development with several midrises and one giant hotel or something, but sometimes that's just not always appropriate, especially for a road like Studemont that can't even handle the current traffic levels as it is. Sometimes it's the smaller things that progress the community, even if it's full of suburban type parking lots. Whether people want to accept it or not, gentrification is going to make the innercity feel more suburban by pulling in people who would have normally moved out to the far flung suburbs. 

 

You didn't hear this from me but the next big area to change dramatically will be the Taylor/Sawyer St. corridor. Most of those warehouses will be gone in several years and will be replaced with more developments such as this, especially after the Sawyer St. expansion which I don't believe has been announced yet. There may even be some more multi-family development in the works.  :ph34r:

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

"mixed-use."

 

haha.

 

 

Hey, it's got a bank AND a drive-thru restaurant, that's a little bit mixed.

 

 

This site reminds me of the Walmart site on Yale in that it's a very central location, but also kind of a no-man's-land, with nothing anywhere near it. Despite having two large-ish multifamily sites relatively nearby (Sawyer Heights Lofts and 4th & Oxford), there is essentially no way to walk to this site without crossing a freeway, a bayou or a RR track. In that sense, I can see why you wouldn't bother to make it pedestrian-centered.

 

Disappointing, but understandable.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not so fast, Grasshopper.  The area bounded by the Katy, Shepherd/Durham, Memorial, and Studemont is just a smidge smaller than downtown inside its necklace of freeways.  Yes, it's got a train track down the middle; so does downtown (granted, the light rail trains are only 200' long rather than a mile or so).  Considering the economic incentives the city is handing out, it's not that big a stretch to include a requirement that the parking consist of something other a fifteen acre field of uninterrupted concrete - which would in turn make it much more walkable.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

his site reminds me of the Walmart site on Yale in that it's a very central location, but also kind of a no-man's-land, with nothing anywhere near it. Despite having two large-ish multifamily sites relatively nearby (Sawyer Heights Lofts and 4th & Oxford), there is essentially no way to walk to this site without crossing a freeway, a bayou or a RR track. In that sense, I can see why you wouldn't bother to make it pedestrian-centered.

 

Disappointing, but understandable.

 

Just wait a few more years. This area will be unrecognizable. Many of these warehouses will be gone and the plan to connect Studemont's Summer St. to Sawyer's Summer St. will make this area feel a lot more different. The city has already created parallel parking (new curbs, sidewalks, parallel parking markers) on Edwards St. between Sawyer and Silver in anticipation for new development that is coming to the area.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So, a lot of commenters are disappointed with the low density and the extent of surface parking. Many commenters on Swamplot (myself included) would like to see HEB/Central Market on this site, so let's compare the two.

 

The "broken-L" half of this development is 66.3k s.f. on 4.9 acres. Central Market on Westheimer is also 66.3k s.f., but sits on 8.2 acres.

 

The land value per square foot under all that surface parking at Westheimer and Weslayan is probably double that for this site. The additional surface parking at CM is roughly equivalent in size to a Walmart Supercenter, yet at the same time, it's often difficult to find a parking space there. This is despite being in a much more pedestrian-friendly area (next to Highland Village) with a lot more residences within walking distance. (Despite its central location, the Grocer's Supply site is all but inaccessible to pedestrians or cyclists.)

 

I'm also not optimistic about the Tarkett site, given its feeder road access and its location between Kroger and Target. There's a reason this area was industrial, squeezed in between a freeway and a railroad. When you remove the industry and add a feeder road, you tend to get feeder-road development.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But then you have to ask yourself, is it a bad thing to get feeder-road development in an area that has always lacked such amenities, especially one in an urban environment? I don't see anyone complaining here about the suburban-ness of the Buffalo Speedway/Highway 59 area.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But then you have to ask yourself, is it a bad thing to get feeder-road development in an area that has always lacked such amenities, especially one in an urban environment? I don't see anyone complaining here about the suburban-ness of the Buffalo Speedway/Highway 59 area.

 

Perhaps if it's one of the only ones left in the city.  No one really likes the Buffalo Speedway/59 area, do they?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Besides, that was developed over 10 years ago, Houston was very different then.

 

So 10 years later, we shouldn't expect suburban-type development in the inner-city? No retail and grocery stores with a large amount of parking? It's going to come to areas where the growth is and where the need is. So what if this same type of development comes to the east of downtown along I-45? Are we going to be upset? What if it comes to Third Ward? Remember, this isn't the beautiful Heights... this is very much a warehouse district with most of the current manufacturing moving to areas along the beltway.

 

As many have said over at Swamplot, this would be a prime location for a HEB and it would be a store I would absolutely go to weekly... especially if it was like the one on West Alabama and Dunlavy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think an area has to go through phases. going from industrial to highly urban is probably a far stretch. It also doesnt help that there isn't a grid system here. We will have to accept the improvement here.

 

I love the urban setting. I am exciting to see Houston going this direction. However, I don't think the area above Washington avenue has the "need" to be highly urban. I enjoy the diversity of development. As long as they use nice materials, plant lots of trees, and invest in the infastructure - I think it will end up nice. After a few years, we might see some of this land go through more changes. Please reference the Target on San Felipe near uptown. High rises are going right next to that large target parking lot. I can bet that this parking lot won't last. And in time - the same for this area. When the need is there, it will come. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You can still get all the amenities you want with all the parking you need, it just doesn't need to be with such a suburban mindset and design, that's all. It could be something like this:

The_Building.jpg

or this:

thefront-e1371793319702.jpg

Thank you! First pic looks great. Maybe the post office site will be something like this.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You can still get all the amenities you want with all the parking you need, it just doesn't need to be with such a suburban mindset and design, that's all. It could be something like this:

 

The_Building.jpg

 

 

 

 

First picture is in the middle of a high-density neighborhood near downtown Seattle, surrounded by residential high-rises and offices, along a light rail line. None of these descriptions apply to the Grocer's Supply site.

 

The nearest equivalent neighborhood in Houston is Midtown, where something very similar to that picture is getting built.

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

First picture is in the middle of a high-density neighborhood near downtown Seattle, surrounded by residential high-rises and offices, along a light rail line. None of these descriptions apply to the Grocer's Supply site.

 

The nearest equivalent neighborhood in Houston is Midtown, where something very similar to that picture is getting built.

 

I'm from Seattle originally and recognized that development the instant I saw the picture you posted - it's in the Denny Triangle/South Lake Union area! It's crazy for me to think how much that area has changed!  ^_^

 

Much like Houston, the area it sits is an area that was very different even just 10 years ago - transitioning from a somewhat blighted area of the city filled with warehouses and vacant lots to a fast growing neighborhood of apartments, retail, biotech companies and even the new headquarters for Amazon. I like to think Midtown could transition into something similar. Both have many elements in common, such as prime location and light rail connection.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

There will be more that follow.  :ph34r: Keep your eye on this area.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tile plant sale fits redevelopment pattern

By Nancy Sarnoff

July 18, 2014 | Updated: July 20, 2014 10:01pm

784x2048.jpg

Powers Brown

Rendering shows the expanded offices in Katy of Norwegian company DNV GL.

A 21-acre parcel sandwiched between the Katy Freeway and the Washington Avenue corridor that has been held by the same owner for more than eight decades has hit the market in what is expected to result in a significant re-development for the area.

Texas Tile Manufacturing, an affiliate of Tarkett USA, is selling its manufacturing plant at 2728 Summer between Studemont and Sawyer streets.

The company plans to vacate the property this summer, as it is relocating its vinyl flooring operations to a sister plant in Florence, Ala.

"This is one of the larger redevelopment tracts, under one ownership, to come on the market in the Heights/Memorial area in some time," said Conrad Bernard of Boyd Commercial, which is marketing the property.

 

http://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/columnists/sarnoff/article/Tile-plant-sale-fits-redevelopment-pattern-5631957.php?cmpid=twitter-premium&t=d1b7473136

 

Edited by Triton
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Well, if the Grocer's Supply development is any indication of what is to come on the Tile Plant site, I wouldn't get too excited. Hoping for the best though.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is in Katy Fernz? I thought it was between 45 and 610?

As for the "Grocery Distributor Warehouse" plot not being exciting.. I'm not sure every large available piece of property in the city is best suited for ultra dense mixed use developments with towers..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is in Katy Fernz? I thought it was between 45 and 610?

As for the "Grocery Distributor Warehouse" plot not being exciting.. I'm not sure every large available piece of property in the city is best suited for ultra dense mixed use developments with towers..

 

cloud713 with the false dichotomy of the morning! ;-)

 

Katyville is lingo from the Swamplot commenters for the quasi-suburban area a couple miles northwest of downtown that aspires to look and feel exactly like something along I-10 west of Highway 6.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is in Katy Fernz? I thought it was between 45 and 610?

As for the "Grocery Distributor Warehouse" plot not being exciting.. I'm not sure every large available piece of property in the city is best suited for ultra dense mixed use developments with towers..

 

Not disagreeing with you that not every plot needs to be mixed use, full of towers, blah blah...Trust me, I think the constant cry for mixed use on this site is way excessive (and irritating at times). I'm just saying that taking a huge parcel of land like this (Grocer's Supply) and throwing in a retail development with seas of head-in parking kind of sucks and I would hope for at least a slightly more urban, pedestrian model in an area that's experiencing pretty rapid growth. But I know these developers do their due diligence (and have figured out what will work best for their bottom line $$) and have the right to put up whatever they want. I'm just hoping that the owners of the tile plant have a better model in mind. 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

cloud713 with the false dichotomy of the morning! ;-)

Katyville is lingo from the Swamplot commenters for the quasi-suburban area a couple miles northwest of downtown that aspires to look and feel exactly like something along I-10 west of Highway 6.

Ahh... I don't comment on swamplot much. Thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wouldn't complain that Houston's becoming too "suburban" especially since the historically low-density did that years ago. In the 1970s, the Heights got a Kmart (decades before the maligned Walmart near I-10) and Montrose got a Kroger (with a relatively large parking lot) with the gamut of fast food (Wendy's, Burger King, McDonald's) in that same era. And no one here is arguing that Montrose is too "suburban" (at least, I hope not).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • The title was changed to Studemont Junction Multifamily

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...