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Warehouse District: Mixed-Use By Urban Genesis


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https://www.urbanoarchitects.com/work#/new-gallery-2/            

This is old-school Urbannizer. Just dropping a bomb on us and walking away, whatever.  

There's a lot more to this - large scale mixed-use development I imagine. Several other plats filed for nearby land. Will post later.

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1 hour ago, j_cuevas713 said:

What prevents developers in cities like NY or Chicago from tearing down older buildings? Is there something in our ordinance’s? 

Those cities have ordinances that prevent property owners from making the best use of their properties by disallowing demolition. Houston generally allows property owners to do whatever meets their needs, except in the areas where overbearing ordinances force people to sell their property if their circumstances change and they can't update a property without going outside the guidelines set by the unelected Historic Commission.(I could be far more snarky about that, but it would take more effort than I want to spend right now)

Having said that, I am always happy when someone finds a way to rehab a building rather than demolishing. I am not going to run around chanting "Tear It Down". However, I am a strong supporter of property rights, and allowing owners to use their property in the manner they see fit, within life safety and anti-nuisance guidelines.

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12 hours ago, j_cuevas713 said:

What's crazy is that two Urban Genesis reps said they would use the bricks from the building to rebuild the facade. This was from a face to face meeting like 2 weeks ago. 

Business lie, like a lot, like constantly.

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On 5/23/2021 at 11:12 PM, sapo2367 said:

Thoughts?

FBD4D305-3B8B-4163-9217-99D5AF4C5999.png

Some people should move to a west Texas ghost town. Very historical. Nothing ever changes. Cities are living things, what sticks around and whats built are reflections of what we value. Even if it's a massive MATTRESS sign. People like sleeping in comfort. This is someone who wants to dictate to the rest of us what we should be valuing and is throwing a fit that we don't share their history hording disorder.

Just like that stupid river oaks theater, you had people out there making fools of themselves irrationally decrying that this place had so much value to them. But as soon as you spent more than a couple moments drilling into that you found how entirely vacuous their stances are.

... So you went like once or twice in the last decade and you feel nostalgic? Basically.

And for that we should all have to pay into your nostalgia tax to a parent corp who very well could have but opted to not pay the rent on the property that put them in violation of their lease contract? And further you'd want us to supersede the right of the actual land owner and steal their property from them. All so you can feel better about a place you never paid enough attention to so it died. No. Ridiculous.

The argument for a decrepit old warehouse no one cared enough about is even dumber.

Historic preservation often go way over board about places and things there's zero behavioral alignment in showing they really cared about it much less anyone else who doesn't share their history hording disease, in all but passing fancy, they are the senescent cells of urban development. But they want use all to pay the price for keeping things the same and the opportunity costs of business moving back in and moving forward. No thanks. Build whatever or keep whatever you think you can make successful.

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7 hours ago, Two said:

Some people should move to a west Texas ghost town. Very historical. Nothing ever changes. Cities are living things, what sticks around and whats built are reflections of what we value. Even if it's a massive MATTRESS sign. People like sleeping in comfort. This is someone who wants to dictate to the rest of us what we should be valuing and is throwing a fit that we don't share their history hording disorder.

Just like that stupid river oaks theater, you had people out there making fools of themselves irrationally decrying that this place had so much value to them. But as soon as you spent more than a couple moments drilling into that you found how entirely vacuous their stances are.

... So you went like once or twice in the last decade and you feel nostalgic? Basically.

And for that we should all have to pay into your nostalgia tax to a parent corp who very well could have but opted to not pay the rent on the property that put them in violation of their lease contract? And further you'd want us to supersede the right of the actual land owner and steal their property from them. All so you can feel better about a place you never paid enough attention to so it died. No. Ridiculous.

The argument for a decrepit old warehouse no one cared enough about is even dumber.

Historic preservation often go way over board about places and things there's zero behavioral alignment in showing they really cared about it much less anyone else who doesn't share their history hording disease, in all but passing fancy, they are the senescent cells of urban development. But they want use all to pay the price for keeping things the same and the opportunity costs of business moving back in and moving forward. No thanks. Build whatever or keep whatever you think you can make successful.

Ok lol

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I think most people here are upset with the fact that buildings are just not built like they used to be with more ornate decoration and sturdier and more costly materials. I don't see many fully brick and masonry façade buildings being built here in Houston. On top of that there are literally hundreds of empty grass fields in the core of the city, with ten times that number in asphalt surface parking lots and a hundred times that in shitty decaying strip centers.

Also I don't understand why some people demand that a building needs to be of exceptional historic and personal significance in order for it to be restored. 

Keeping these buildings keeps some character in the city. All the new apartment complexes look the same and get very tedious. I once heard a description of driving around Houston is like those old cartoon chase scenes where the background keeping repeating over and over. 

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Went by Tuesday, about the same stage as @hindesky posted above. The water hole has dried up, and every day a little more debris is hauled off. The lead excavator (my new buddy 😁) told me they have about 2 weeks left to scrape it clean, before they move on.

It's amazing how good the view of downtown Houston is from here.

mckee.jpg

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I'm confused (not an unusual state of mind for me 🙃). I thought this was a "mixed use" project--residences, restaurants, light retail, common dining areas, yada yada. Now it's just another apt complex? Or two complexes?

Excuse me... with "art walls".

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4 hours ago, Texasota said:

Hopefully they don't turn out like 850 McKee at least. Filled with confidence in these people I am not.

This is actually not bad. They’re pumping a lot of people in to this area which is what it needs to grow and thrive. It’s been stagnant for far too long. My only hope is that the core buildings in the district remain. Most of them are occupied. 

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It's ok. But in this neighborhood, that's disappointing! More people is absolutely good, but each mediocre building that goes up is a missed opportunity to do something really special. This is fine, but it aint special.

Edited by Texasota
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According to HCAD the owner of the bigger warehouse next to the Elysian is "UG Old Hardy" which is Urban Genesis. The owner of the smaller building next to McKee is Fast Equipment Rentals but I suspect that UG will probably buy that too.

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NxDf1PF.png

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Posted (edited)
On 5/28/2021 at 10:53 AM, H-Town Man said:

And here, by the way, is what the above building looked like before it was renovated. Wouldn't have stood a snowflake's chance in hell if it had been in Houston.

old-dark-warehouse-stylish-modern-galler

Not necessarily.  The old Oriental Textile Mill in the Heights was repurposed/renovated, and the condition wasn’t too much different than the structure you’ve posted an image of.  A shame, there are solid restoration architects here in the area (despite what one might think) and it is possible to salvage structures.

 

It just takes a developer who is 100% behind saving as much of the building as possible.  There aren’t too many developers in Houston interested in that, they know it’s easier to demolish a building and start with a clean slate.

 

*EDIT: I beg your pardon*

You are probably correct that the above would not have been renovated in Houston, but there are examples of similar structures being saved and restored locally - even if they are few and far between.  I think the ease with which someone can tear down a building is the issue here in Houston.  We don’t have enough people with money interested in saving properties.  I wonder if that is partly due to how many people have moved here since the ~1970s, and the fact many don’t have historical roots in this area?  At least until recently.

Edited by arche_757
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On 7/4/2021 at 2:48 PM, hindesky said:

I wonder if this or one of their other plots will have a restaurant, Gin Design Group specializes in retail design. 

https://www.gindesigngroup.com

sLQOTvy.jpg

gin design group is handling the interior design (finishes, hardware, plumbing fixtures, light fixtures, and accessibility equipment) for these projects.

 

Also, no restaurants are planed for 813 and 850 McKee (and nothing in the future that I am aware of).

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As mentioned above, I think Gin is expanding a lot more into general interior design. They did interior design work for Forth at Navigation which, at this time, still does not have any restaurants or other GFR (though the plan is still to have some).

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  • 2 weeks later...

I went by this week, first time in a while. Doesn't look like any change since @hindeskyposted pics a few weeks back. Demo seems to have come to a stop. No one on site, even the equipment looks to be in the same spot. The site had standing water, it's possible the rain is causing issues?

mckee.jpg

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