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Montrose Collective: Office Building With Retail Coming To 888 Westheimer


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http://horticulturalbuildingsystems.com/?page_id=219    

Black brick on Westheimer.

Took This Aerial Shot of the Montrose Collective this morning.

Posted Images

By the time we hit two mil vaccinations in Houston and we get thumbs up to start lowering our guard, so early summer probably, this part of Montrose is going to be demonstrably different, with this and the other projects and the new pocket park. And this place will be close to opening up, given its current pace. All the while having an open-air design which alleviates some COVID-concerns. Fantastic timing and design. Thanks for the pics @hindesky 

I'm predicting this part of Montrose to be BUSY.

Edited by X.R.
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Montrose Collective On Track To Open First Phase In Late 2021

 

Montrose Collective is on pace to open in the fourth quarter of 2021, introducing new office and retail space to one of Houston’s most popular Inner Loop corridors.

The mixed-use project is located at the busy corner of Westheimer Road and Montrose Boulevard. Houston-based developer Radom Capital broke ground in February 2020 on the project’s first phase: a six-story, 197K SF building that contains both office and retail. The creative office component accounts for 119K SF, while retail makes up the remaining 78K SF.

Radom Capital Managing Principal and founder Steve Radom told Bisnow that the outer shell is scheduled to deliver by late summer. The building is 61% pre-leased, and the first office tenants should begin moving in during Q4. Retail and restaurant tenants are also expected to begin moving in around that time, through Q1 2022.

As part of Montrose Collective, the firm is also building a structure on the other side of Grant Street, immediately to the west of the main building and directly behind Japanese restaurant Uchi and Southside Espresso. That building will house the new location of the Freed-Montrose Neighborhood Library.

Construction is slated to break ground this week, and the shell will deliver during the summer. The city of Houston will then begin interior build-out of the library, which is expected to open to the public in early 2022.

Radom said the coronavirus pandemic didn't affect the construction timeline for the project, but leasing activity for the firm did slow, particularly in the first few months.

“We went from having ... [an] oversubscription of demand for almost every single space at the ground floor to like, the phone's not ringing for three to six months,” Radom said.

The leasing slowdown has since reversed. Radom signed nine new leases in January, a significant increase compared with the firm’s cumulative 32 leases that were signed between the onset of the pandemic in March and the end of 2020.

“We're fortunately back to where the last 60 days and specifically, last 30 days, have been the busiest in our firm's history,” Radom said.

When Radom Capital was founded in 2014, it mostly focused on small-scale retail projects, before gradually branching into creative office. The firm’s ambitious M-K-T mixed-use, adaptive reuse project in the Houston Heightsopened during the fourth quarter of 2020 and has received praise from industry professionals and the public.

M-K-T is a collection of five adapted industrial buildings along the hike-and-bike trail and has about 200K SF of creative office and retail space. Radom Capital partnered with Triten Real Estate Partners to develop the project. The firm brought on lauded Austin-based Michael Hsu Office of Architecture to design both M-K-T and Montrose Collective.

The success of Radom Capital’s Houston projects has prompted the firm to start looking at expanding into other asset classes, such as residential, as well as the prospect of taking on projects in other cities within Texas.

“We think at this point, to have a long-term sustainable company that is a little bit more diversified, it would make sense to have exposure to other markets and other asset classes,” Radom said.

Montrose Collective is not the only new mixed-use project underway in the immediate area. Skanska announced in August that it had acquired a 124K SF, 2.86-acre site at the corner of Westheimer Road and Montrose Boulevard, diagonal from Montrose Collective’s location.

Demolition of the existing retail center kicked off in January. Though Skanska has not released many details about the development, it is expected that the project will have both multifamily and retail. The proximity of the two mixed-use developments is expected to further improve the popularity and walkability of the area, Radom said.

D.E. Harvey Buildings is the general contractor for Montrose Collective. Project partners include Michael Hsu Office of Architecture, OJB Landscape Architecture, HOK, Kimley-Horn and DBR Inc. CBRE is overseeing office leasing, while Shop Cos. is handling retail leasing.

Radom secured $105M in financing for the project in March. JLL represented the firm in securing the loan from Bank OZK and joint venture equity from institutional investors advised by J.P. Morgan Asset Management. The project is the first joint venture between Radom Capital and J.P. Morgan Asset Management.

Contact Christie Moffat at christie.moffat@bisnow.com
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exciting stuff for sure! but yes Montrose if definitely changing...

i am so thankful to have experienced the old Montrose and while it is sad in some aspects, it is exciting to see the changes and growth. 

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

Why does that glass look so attractive? Is it the color of the glass, or is it because its new? I can't tell, but that brick plus that glass is gonna look great.

Also, I know we lamented the loss of the old library, and some part of me does too, but a rooftop reading deck sounds great. 

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On 3/4/2021 at 4:25 PM, X.R. said:

Also, I know we lamented the loss of the old library, and some part of me does too, but a rooftop reading deck sounds great. 

Do we know yet what the University of Saint Thomas is planning for the old Library/Black Lab property? I would HATE to see it demolished and replaced.

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On 3/4/2021 at 4:25 PM, X.R. said:

Why does that glass look so attractive? Is it the color of the glass, or is it because its new? I can't tell, but that brick plus that glass is gonna look great.

Also, I know we lamented the loss of the old library, and some part of me does too, but a rooftop reading deck sounds great. 

Pretty sure it’s the Guardian SNX 62/27. Super clear but has a lot of reflection. I’ve used it on other projects and it looks the same. 

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normally I like buildings that look and feel new.  Something about the garage on this job looks 10 or even 20 years old and I kinda dig it. 

Mad props to the developer for taking a risk, I hope it pays off for them and encourages others (hint Skanska) to see Montrose has an area that will allow for a bit more creativity than other parts of town.

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2 hours ago, tangledwoods said:

Mad props to the developer for taking a risk, I hope it pays off for them and encourages others (hint Skanska) to see Montrose has an area that will allow for a bit more creativity than other parts of town.

If you ask me, it’s the developers who are averse to creativity, not any particular parts of town. 

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16 hours ago, MidCenturyMoldy said:

If you ask me, it’s the developers who are averse to creativity, not any particular parts of town. 

You realize city permitting makes anything that is not super cookie cutter very expensive, time consuming, and risky to do right? Need variances for anything remotely pleasing to the eye. 

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10 hours ago, iah77 said:

You realize city permitting makes anything that is not super cookie cutter very expensive, time consuming, and risky to do right? Need variances for anything remotely pleasing to the eye. 

Does that include the Lyric Center parking garage or the Cambridge Office Building parking garage at Rice because both of those are excellent? Also the parking garage at the proposed development at Taft and Fairview was/is definitely not the ordinary schlocky garage.

Edited by MidCenturyMoldy
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On 3/10/2021 at 10:55 AM, texas911 said:

Whatever the cause, love love love the design of this project.

It’s not the permitting or the cost. It’s solely the developers risk tolerance. Radom Capital definitely sees the payoff in leasable spaces if they spend money on good design. 

Rice Design Alliance

Super in depth article on the project from Rice Design Alliance. 
 

 

1689357034_MontroseCollectiveRisingRiceDesignAlliance.pdf

Edited by architeckton
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14 hours ago, architeckton said:

It’s not the permitting or the cost. It’s solely the developers risk tolerance. Radom Capital definitely sees the payoff in leasable spaces if they spend money on good design. 

Rice Design Alliance

Super in depth article on the project from Rice Design Alliance. 
 

 

1689357034_MontroseCollectiveRisingRiceDesignAlliance.pdf 2.56 MB · 9 downloads

Cost is literally a synonym for risk tolerance, and yes for most small developers going bankrupt is something to advert lol. I think we can all agree that the city does not make it easy and encourages bad design. 

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6 hours ago, iah77 said:

Cost is literally a synonym for risk tolerance, and yes for most small developers going bankrupt is something to advert lol. I think we can all agree that the city does not make it easy and encourages bad design. 

In what way exactly (other than mandatory parking minimums) is Houston more egregious than any other city in America? I was under the impression that the city was generally more permissive than most cities when it came to permitting.

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17 hours ago, Big E said:

In what way exactly (other than mandatory parking minimums) is Houston more egregious than any other city in America? I was under the impression that the city was generally more permissive than most cities when it came to permitting.

FWIW, you didn't need the exception for mandatory parking minimums.  Houston is in no way an outlier in that regard. Overall we are probably have below average mandatory parking minimums.

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Risk intolerance by developers and  inflexible city codes aside, what role does the financial institution that puts up the money play in determining the creativity (or lack of same) in architectural design?
I have the impression that, in general, bankers believe that the more conventional the design, the lower the risk. 

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2 hours ago, cityliving said:

Parking garage panels were being installed on the Crocker street side this morning, looks like a freight elevator was put up on the Crocker street side also.

csY1A1n.jpg

The brick layers use that to install the brick.

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Oh ok. I thought they used scaffolding to install the bricks?

What you are looking at is a "Mast Climber" in the construction world it is a form of scaffolding but obviously very different from what you see on the other elevations.  Typically used on taller structures, not really sure why they are using one here.

SafRise® Mast Climbers | Hoists and Lifts (brandsafway.com)

 

 

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On 3/17/2021 at 4:25 PM, tangledwoods said:

What you are looking at is a "Mast Climber" in the construction world it is a form of scaffolding but obviously very different from what you see on the other elevations.  Typically used on taller structures, not really sure why they are using one here.

SafRise® Mast Climbers | Hoists and Lifts (brandsafway.com)

 

 

Complicated brick laying pattern here. Plus there is only brick on that stair tower so it doesn’t make sense to put scaffolding on the whole Crocker facade. 

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6 hours ago, thatguysly said:

I ate at Burger Joint Saturday and saw this for the first time in person. Having lived near there for 5 years and spending a lot of time at this intersection, I really love how this project fits into the neighborhood. I think they did a great good of building a midrise that really doesn't feel like it is taking over the area.

It's by far my favorite under-construction project in the entire city for that reason, among others :)

Edited by HouTXRanger
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