H-Town Man

CULBER-GONE!

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H-Town Man    2,298

I felt this deserved its own thread. Time for Metro to pull out whatever money it has tucked away in mattresses and start laying track on Richmond a.s.a.p., and don't even think about Westpark until you're west of 610, go straight through Afton Oaks. Send the jackhammers out there tomorrow.

 

We wonnnnnnnnnnn, baby!

 

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Moderators    12

Thank God that thorn in the back side 

of Metro is gone. Metro now can

proceed with rail to the west side.of

town.

Very good night for rail fans in

Houston.

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innerloop    42

These have been my thoughts all along during the campaign.  Metro should act immediately to start a line down Richmond from Midtown to at least Sage.

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mfastx    469

Great news for Metro, but I have my doubts that they are in a position to begin construction on the old University line anytime soon.  Seems like they've given up on the line entirely.  

 

Plus, the law that Culberson got passed prohibiting federal funds for any rail down Richmond presumably still needs to be overturned. 

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Luminare    1,570
32 minutes ago, mfastx said:

Great news for Metro, but I have my doubts that they are in a position to begin construction on the old University line anytime soon.  Seems like they've given up on the line entirely.  

 

Plus, the law that Culberson got passed prohibiting federal funds for any rail down Richmond presumably still needs to be overturned. 

 

Remember that Dems also took the House. Plus Trump has been will to throw fed money for infrastructure projects. I think thats a good combination to both overturn the law and get the money flowing. This was an incredible coup.

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cspwal    2,140

I hope that it gets fully funded as a rail line for immediate construction

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H-Town Man    2,298

mfastx is probably right, it will take some time to undo the damage Culberson did, and of course Fletcher has to win again every two years. The state may also gerrymander the district so that Culberson can get it back (just shear off Montrose and add a little to the Cy-Fair portion), but that is probably a race against time since everything in Harris County is getting bluer due to Hispanic birth rate and alienation of educated conservatives.

 

Speaking of Harris County turning blue, amazing to see that Ed Emmett was ousted by a 27 year-old with no experience. That is actually kind of worrying. He single-handedly saved the Astrodome and had a good grip on the flood situation.

 

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j_cuevas713    1,251
25 minutes ago, H-Town Man said:

mfastx is probably right, it will take some time to undo the damage Culberson did, and of course Fletcher has to win again every two years. The state may also gerrymander the district so that Culberson can get it back (just shear off Montrose and add a little to the Cy-Fair portion), but that is probably a race against time since everything in Harris County is getting bluer due to Hispanic birth rate and alienation of educated conservatives.

 

Speaking of Harris County turning blue, amazing to see that Ed Emmett was ousted by a 27 year-old with no experience. That is actually kind of worrying. He single-handedly saved the Astrodome and had a good grip on the flood situation.

 

Emmett was one of the few Republicans I liked. But the county and state are getting bluer and bluer by the year. No surprise honestly. 

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KinkaidAlum    2,258

I lean Democratic but I always vote for several GOP folks, especially judges. 

 

Yesterday was the first time I voted straight party and I have no regrets. I like Ed, but a statement needed to be sent. The GOP in Texas should be very, very nervous. Every major county went Blue, including Republican strongholds like Williamson and Tarrant. 

 

Unfortunately, despite living 3 blocks from Kirby, I've been gerrymandered into TX 02 so I didn't get to vote for Lizzie. My good friend a grew up with, Todd Litton, did quite respectable considering how GOP leaning that district actually is. I don't think we've heard the last of Todd. 

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H-Town Man    2,298
18 minutes ago, KinkaidAlum said:

I lean Democratic but I always vote for several GOP folks, especially judges. 

 

Yesterday was the first time I voted straight party and I have no regrets. I like Ed, but a statement needed to be sent. The GOP in Texas should be very, very nervous. Every major county went Blue, including Republican strongholds like Williamson and Tarrant. 

 

Unfortunately, despite living 3 blocks from Kirby, I've been gerrymandered into TX 02 so I didn't get to vote for Lizzie. My good friend a grew up with, Todd Litton, did quite respectable considering how GOP leaning that district actually is. I don't think we've heard the last of Todd. 

 

I think the balance of power in Texas between Republican and Democrat is somewhere between the Beto/Cruz results where the GOP won by just 3% and the governor's race where the GOP won by 13%. Beto was a sensation while Cruz was the former enemy of Trump and someone most Republicans are not too enthusiastic about for various reasons. The Democrats rode a wave of enthusiasm while the Republicans filed out to do their duty. If someone were to galvanize the Republicans the way Beto did the Democrats, you would see something like a 10-15% victory. I do think the Democrats win a major Texas race in the next 5-10 years, not sure when/who it will be.

 

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Luminare    1,570
2 hours ago, H-Town Man said:

mfastx is probably right, it will take some time to undo the damage Culberson did, and of course Fletcher has to win again every two years. The state may also gerrymander the district so that Culberson can get it back (just shear off Montrose and add a little to the Cy-Fair portion), but that is probably a race against time since everything in Harris County is getting bluer due to Hispanic birth rate and alienation of educated conservatives.

 

Speaking of Harris County turning blue, amazing to see that Ed Emmett was ousted by a 27 year-old with no experience. That is actually kind of worrying. He single-handedly saved the Astrodome and had a good grip on the flood situation.

 

 

Montrose is actually districted to now Dan Crenshaw. One of the few new young GOP I actually like. He is more center-right. Many of the Dems that got voted in turning counties blue where center-left. The statements were clear, but it was a reject of extremism from both the right and left. Less Progressives and less Neo-Cons. I think the result will be fresh congress that will actually get a little work done.

 

I was sad to see Ed Emmett lose though. My guess is that they just didn't push for him enough. I know nothing about the new person. But from the comments it doesn't seem like its a welcomed change. Luckily as far as flood prevention goes, George P. Bush will continue as GLO and is looking to get the Feds involved with funding the Ike Dike and other flood preventions.

 

I'm looking forward to Lizzy, Shiela, and hopefully Ben go to the Feds and demand that we get the money that was promised us in that referendum and get a bunch of rail projects started immediately.

 

EDIT: While I state that I do like Dan Crenshaw, Montrose does not belong in his district. Montrose should be districted with Shiela Jackson Lee's district. We have more in common with the rest of the inner city than we do with people in Klein, and Spring. Even if the GOP does control the map after the census the demographics are vastly changing within Houston and I think it will be a lot harder to gerrymander Houston as many different people from many walks of life have entered the city. The city is just to diverse to gerrymander at in the upcoming census, I think.

 

CORRECTION: Dan Crenshaw

Edited by Luminare

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gmac    176

Ben Crenshaw was a helluva golfer, but I don't think he ever ran for office :rolleyes:

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mkultra25    606
1 hour ago, KinkaidAlum said:

I lean Democratic but I always vote for several GOP folks, especially judges. 

 

Yesterday was the first time I voted straight party and I have no regrets. I like Ed, but a statement needed to be sent.

 

And it will be both the first and the last time you vote a straight-party ticket, as the option to cast a straight-party vote will be removed in Texas starting with the next election. A long-overdue change, IMO, as it forces people to at least look at the candidates' names instead of just mindlessly opting for "D" or "R" (not saying you're part of that group, as you've clearly given your choices some thought). 

 

Ed Emmett was unquestionably collateral damage from the heavy straight-ticket voting. I am dismayed that he was thrown out in favor of someone who does not appear to be in the same ballpark as far as experience and qualifications, but I'm hopeful that Ms. Hidalgo will rise to the occasion and prove us doubters wrong. 

 

On the plus side, all the misdemeanor court judges who were fighting the Federal court ruling on the constitutionality of the county's bail system were summarily thrown out as well. I'm not entirely unsympathetic to some of their claims of doing so out of concern for judicial autonomy, but they picked the wrong hill to die on. 

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Luminare    1,570
1 hour ago, gmac said:

Ben Crenshaw was a helluva golfer, but I don't think he ever ran for office :rolleyes:

 

haha I knew it as soon as I walked out for Lunch I made that mistake.

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EllenOlenska    640

Straight ticket voting is good tbh 

Also: Anyone want to give me a plausible vision of this effecting metrorail expansion? 

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Reefmonkey    33
4 hours ago, mkultra25 said:

 

And it will be both the first and the last time you vote a straight-party ticket, as the option to cast a straight-party vote will be removed in Texas starting with the next election. A long-overdue change, IMO, as it forces people to at least look at the candidates' names instead of just mindlessly opting for "D" or "R" (not saying you're part of that group, as you've clearly given your choices some thought). 

 

Ed Emmett was unquestionably collateral damage from the heavy straight-ticket voting. I am dismayed that he was thrown out in favor of someone who does not appear to be in the same ballpark as far as experience and qualifications, but I'm hopeful that Ms. Hidalgo will rise to the occasion and prove us doubters wrong. 

 

On the plus side, all the misdemeanor court judges who were fighting the Federal court ruling on the constitutionality of the county's bail system were summarily thrown out as well. I'm not entirely unsympathetic to some of their claims of doing so out of concern for judicial autonomy, but they picked the wrong hill to die on. 

100% agree.

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kennyc05    75
4 hours ago, mkultra25 said:

 

And it will be both the first and the last time you vote a straight-party ticket, as the option to cast a straight-party vote will be removed in Texas starting with the next election. A long-overdue change, IMO, as it forces people to at least look at the candidates' names instead of just mindlessly opting for "D" or "R" (not saying you're part of that group, as you've clearly given your choices some thought). 

 

Ed Emmett was unquestionably collateral damage from the heavy straight-ticket voting. I am dismayed that he was thrown out in favor of someone who does not appear to be in the same ballpark as far as experience and qualifications, but I'm hopeful that Ms. Hidalgo will rise to the occasion and prove us doubters wrong. 

 

On the plus side, all the misdemeanor court judges who were fighting the Federal court ruling on the constitutionality of the county's bail system were summarily thrown out as well. I'm not entirely unsympathetic to some of their claims of doing so out of concern for judicial autonomy, but they picked the wrong hill to die on. 

Somebody is salty ;)

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mkultra25    606
2 hours ago, kennyc05 said:

Somebody is salty ;)

 

Nah, not salty at all. There was a lot to like in the election results. Very happy for state Sen. Sylvia Garcia, who won Gene Green's former Congressional seat without much opposition, but I'm not exactly an impartial observer as she's one of my neighbors. 

 

It's going to be interesting to see how the shift in power on Commissioner's Court plays out, as in addition to Emmett's loss Jack Morman was beaten by Adrian Garcia. Garcia wasn't shy about making changes when he was Sheriff, so I'm guessing he'll operate in similar fashion in his new job. 

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kennyc05    75
20 minutes ago, mkultra25 said:

 

Nah, not salty at all. There was a lot to like in the election results. Very happy for state Sen. Sylvia Garcia, who won Gene Green's former Congressional seat without much opposition, but I'm not exactly an impartial observer as she's one of my neighbors. 

 

It's going to be interesting to see how the shift in power on Commissioner's Court plays out, as in addition to Emmett's loss Jack Morman was beaten by Adrian Garcia. Garcia wasn't shy about making changes when he was Sheriff, so I'm guessing he'll operate in similar fashion in his new job. 

Yes it will be interesting to see how it all pans out. 

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ArchFan    277

I'm reminded of the old Wizard-of-Oz tune that began with the words "Ding-dong, the wicked witch is dead".  :-)

 

But ... upon reflection it may be that greater damage was done by Bob Lanier, who as mayor, raided the giant nest egg Metro had accumulated by the early 90s.  I don't recall the exact amount, but I think it was in the neighborhood of $700-800 million.  What would that be worth today?  A lot!

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august948    700
5 hours ago, j_cuevas713 said:

 

From the article:

Quote

 

But what does Fletcher’s election mean for any Richmond rail plans?

Patman said for cost reasons they’re now considering bus rapid transit for the Richmond corridor, to help provide better connections between downtown and The Galleria. But she added that project would also require help from Washington, D.C.

 

 

So it looks like Metro isn't planning rail on Richmond anyway.

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august948    700
9 hours ago, EllenOlenska said:

Straight ticket voting is good tbh 

Also: Anyone want to give me a plausible vision of this effecting metrorail expansion? 

 

Straight ticket voting is easy.  Whether or not it's good is debatable.  At any rate, sounds like it is going away.

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august948    700
13 hours ago, Luminare said:

 

Remember that Dems also took the House. Plus Trump has been will to throw fed money for infrastructure projects. I think thats a good combination to both overturn the law and get the money flowing. This was an incredible coup.

 

We'll have to see how this pans out.  The dems in the house may choose to #resist for the next two years, even on things they might otherwise agree on.  Remember how they bailed on a DACA fix?  Even if they can agree, which I think Trump is more likely to do since he's not really an ideologue, will the senate go along?  I'm thinking we're looking at two years of more gridlock.  Hope I'm wrong.

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tigereye    1,693
22 hours ago, H-Town Man said:

I felt this deserved its own thread. Time for Metro to pull out whatever money it has tucked away in mattresses and start laying track on Richmond a.s.a.p., and don't even think about Westpark until you're west of 610, go straight through Afton Oaks. Send the jackhammers out there tomorrow.

 

We wonnnnnnnnnnn, baby!

 

 

Hell yeah. A Blue Wave in this city at the polls might finally lead to a Blue Line train at last. 

 

With McNair’s The Post Oak development coming, I’d definitely run the Blue Line in its originally planned alignment voters in this city approved - right through Afton Oaks. Traffic on 59 is bad enough already. If Metro is serious about increasing ridership, they’ll do the full Blue Line, maybe even tie it into the planned Hobby extension (instead of 2 lines to Hobby) 

Edited by tigereye

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gmac    176

Hopefully they jackhammer your house (looking at you, H-Town Man) and build a parking lot on the land.

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UtterlyUrban    1,525
7 hours ago, ArchFan said:

I'm reminded of the old Wizard-of-Oz tune that began with the words "Ding-dong, the wicked witch is dead".  :-)

 

But ... upon reflection it may be that greater damage was done by Bob Lanier, who as mayor, raided the giant nest egg Metro had accumulated by the early 90s.  I don't recall the exact amount, but I think it was in the neighborhood of $700-800 million.  What would that be worth today?  A lot!

I remember Lanier doing this.

 

but, be careful.....  metro may not have been able to “invest that money” ...... I don’t know but they may have rules against it.  If so, that money would be worth less today.

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j_cuevas713    1,251
9 hours ago, august948 said:

 

From the article:

 

So it looks like Metro isn't planning rail on Richmond anyway.

I’m fine with that. As long as we connect both sides of the city somehow.

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H-Town Man    2,298
10 hours ago, august948 said:

 

From the article:

 

So it looks like Metro isn't planning rail on Richmond anyway.

 

Yet. They have surely not met and discussed plans since Fletcher's upset victory. It may be though that it starts out as a BRT line before becoming rail, due to cost.

 

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Luminare    1,570
7 minutes ago, H-Town Man said:

 

Yet. They have surely not met and discussed plans since Fletcher's upset victory. It may be though that it starts out as a BRT line before becoming rail, due to cost.

 

 

I think history has made METRO hopefully optimistic and prepare for the worst yet hope for the best. Lets remember that interview was done before she won. When people want things done in this town, things move incredibly quickly. Things are going to change pretty rapidly if this was a major issue she was campaigning on. I expect METRO to hang back until they meet with here and see what her ambitions are and then see what kind of pull she can get from Congress. Again these things take time, but will move very quickly once the dust settles.

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H-Town Man    2,298
30 minutes ago, Luminare said:

 

I think history has made METRO hopefully optimistic and prepare for the worst yet hope for the best. Lets remember that interview was done before she won. When people want things done in this town, things move incredibly quickly. Things are going to change pretty rapidly if this was a major issue she was campaigning on. I expect METRO to hang back until they meet with here and see what her ambitions are and then see what kind of pull she can get from Congress. Again these things take time, but will move very quickly once the dust settles.

 

Good comment. The one continuing problem though is the mystifyingly high cost of light rail. Unless they have a pretty good rainy day fund, I could see them having to do a bond election to jumpstart anything.

 

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Slick Vik    449
1 hour ago, H-Town Man said:

 

Good comment. The one continuing problem though is the mystifyingly high cost of light rail. Unless they have a pretty good rainy day fund, I could see them having to do a bond election to jumpstart anything.

 

 

The high cost is labor. Rail is built cheaper in other countries. 

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Luminare    1,570
1 hour ago, H-Town Man said:

 

Good comment. The one continuing problem though is the mystifyingly high cost of light rail. Unless they have a pretty good rainy day fund, I could see them having to do a bond election to jumpstart anything.

 

 

Honestly, with the biggest growth in the past 10 years have been people moving in from the East coast, West coast, and internationals. All from cities with better rail infrastructure. The demographics are such that the people living within Houston city limits will be asking for more rail. It might actually be a better idea to send Metro back to the drawing board. Really stuff a plan with as much rail as they would like possible and then put out an updated referendum in 2020. If the citizens were willing to vote for billions in flood infrastructure, are ok with getting Feds to pay for an ike dike, and ... hell... even voted for a terrible proposition to raise fire fighter wages, then that means people want the government to spend money and make serious upgrades to everything. I don't think we understand just how much Houston is on the brink to becoming a real player in terms of global cities. All it needs is just a little push.

Edited by Luminare

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dbigtex56    302
On 11/7/2018 at 11:07 AM, Luminare said:

Montrose should be districted with Shiela Jackson Lee's district.

Until 2013, portions of it were.
Imagine my shock and dismay when suddenly my neighborhood was cut from District 18 (Sheila Jackson Lee) and added to District 7 (John Culberson) in a shameless act of gerrymandering. 
I lived in the Montrose for nearly 35 years. I believe that the election of Kathy Whitmire in '81 scared the living crap out of Republicans, who suddenly realized that this little neighborhood had a great big voice. Since then it's purposely been chopped into mincemeat at the city, county, state, and federal level. 

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august948    700
18 hours ago, H-Town Man said:

 

Good comment. The one continuing problem though is the mystifyingly high cost of light rail. Unless they have a pretty good rainy day fund, I could see them having to do a bond election to jumpstart anything.

 

 

I remember reading somewhere that a bond proposal is in the works for next year.

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j_cuevas713    1,251
4 hours ago, august948 said:

 

I remember reading somewhere that a bond proposal is in the works for next year.

Do yall feel the people of this city would support such a bond with ease or will there be major push back much how the RedLine started?

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H-Town Man    2,298
21 minutes ago, j_cuevas713 said:

Do yall feel the people of this city would support such a bond with ease or will there be major push back much how the RedLine started?

 

As long as it does not require a tax increase, it will pass.

 

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Rehan    4
15 hours ago, dbigtex56 said:

Until 2013, portions of it were.
Imagine my shock and dismay when suddenly my neighborhood was cut from District 18 (Sheila Jackson Lee) and added to District 7 (John Culberson) in a shameless act of gerrymandering. 
I lived in the Montrose for nearly 35 years. I believe that the election of Kathy Whitmire in '81 scared the living crap out of Republicans, who suddenly realized that this little neighborhood had a great big voice. Since then it's purposely been chopped into mincemeat at the city, county, state, and federal level. 

Hoping that the next round of redistricting is not as ridiculous as the last. I took some creative liberties with a few voting districts to make smoother lines, but here is my CD-7 submission:

CD7.jpg

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Triton    9,105

I consider myself a moderate and I actually shared some of Culberson's enthusiasm for the space industry here in Houston. That being said, I think it's probably for the better that he was replaced, especially when it comes to mass transit that's desperately needed in this city.

 

I would challenge others here though on the University Line. If this project requires federal funds, then I would say let's make this a dedicated light rail system or hell, let's even talk about using the Boring Company to build a system underground. It's doable even with the type of ground we have here but the pushback has always been about cost... perhaps the Boring Company can bring that cost considerably down. I think the problem with the current light rail system is that it is SLOW. If you travel to any other city such as DC or Denver*, you literally fly past the traffic sitting on the highways while you wisp from one station to the next. Here, the light rail system has to slow down and wait for the "white light" signal to go forward at many intersections, it causes cars to sit longer at the lights waiting for the trains to pass through, and metro police rarely check to see if a person has a ticket to be on board, so you have tons of homeless people sleeping on the train.

 

I think mass transit's goals for this city should be the following:

Be faster than the congestion on the roads

Be safer so that more people feel comfortable getting on board (enforce ticket checks... increased revenue for Metro)

Be dedicated so that it doesn't affect the local traffic

 

 

*commuter rail

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Luminare    1,570
2 hours ago, Triton said:

I consider myself a moderate and I actually shared some of Culberson's enthusiasm for the space industry here in Houston. That being said, I think it's probably for the better that he was replaced, especially when it comes to mass transit that's desperately needed in this city.

 

I would challenge others here though on the University Line. If this project requires federal funds, then I would say let's make this a dedicated light rail system or hell, let's even talk about using the Boring Company to build a system underground. It's doable even with the type of ground we have here but the pushback has always been about cost... perhaps the Boring Company can bring that cost considerably down. I think the problem with the current light rail system is that it is SLOW. If you travel to any other city such as DC or Denver*, you literally fly past the traffic sitting on the highways while you wisp from one station to the next. Here, the light rail system has to slow down and wait for the "white light" signal to go forward at many intersections, it causes cars to sit longer at the lights waiting for the trains to pass through, and metro police rarely check to see if a person has a ticket to be on board, so you have tons of homeless people sleeping on the train.

 

I think mass transit's goals for this city should be the following:

Be faster than the congestion on the roads

Be safer so that more people feel comfortable getting on board (enforce ticket checks... increased revenue for Metro)

Be dedicated so that it doesn't affect the local traffic

 

 

*commuter rail

 

Thats the thing. I actually favored Culberson on a number of issues. He just wasn't very pragmatic. If anything is going to be done to improve, either the situation in Congress, or improvements to the city, then we need people that are going to be more pragmatic, flexible, and will to make a deal.

 

Even if we did lure a company like the Boring Company to do something of which you are supposing I would still do light rail. The best transit system is one that hits all levels.

 

Light rail - extremely local, most stops

Subway - gets you to key destinations within the city, general stops

Commuter Rail - same as subway, but then branches out to suburbs, good at getting people from destination to work and destination to where one lives

Regional Rail - good to get you from city centers to small towns or outside communities and eventually to other cities at slower speeds then

High Speed - city to city

 

They are all needed because they work at different levels. You are dead on about your assessment though and I do lean with you in your thoughts about Culberson.

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Luminare    1,570
3 hours ago, Rehan said:

Hoping that the next round of redistricting is not as ridiculous as the last. I took some creative liberties with a few voting districts to make smoother lines, but here is my CD-7 submission:

CD7.jpg

 

This is pretty great. One change. I would make Shepard the boundary between the districts.

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Rehan    4
7 minutes ago, Luminare said:

 

This is pretty great. One change. I would make Shepard the boundary between the districts.

Would not argue with that at all.

 

Of course it is all theoretical at this point until after the census and reapportionment. The blue area to the west was the newly created CD-39 in my model. It consists of all of western Harris County bounded by FM 2978, a tiny stretch of 249, Jones Rd, 1960/Hwy 6, and Westheimer. I had to shift CD-7 further east to make up for the population it ceded in the west.

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felt38    6

I won't miss Culberson with his anti-rail agenda. but am disappointed about some of the anti-NASA rhetoric toward him from Lizzie Fletcher.  Culberson was a strong supporter of Johnson Space Center and NASA, and the replacement of him with an apparent anti-space congressperson is disappointing.  I realize most here have Metrorail expansion farther up there priorities list, which is understandable, but I'll be watching how she votes on these issues.    NASA, too, is in part a form of infrastructure and we shouldn't let it be abandoned. 

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BigFootsSocks    2,852

Felt I’m not gonna lie I’m kind of in the same position. He was a HUGE proponent of a Europa lander, not just a probe, and I hope his replacement can push the same project as strong as he did. 

 

Public transit projects can be huge for our city in his absence too. 

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texas911    23

So people that are moving to Houston come from cities that have rail. What do they all have in common, its outrageously expensive to live in those cities! Thanks, but no thanks. You want to live in a city with rail, go move there! Options people, options.

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KinkaidAlum    2,258

Again, I've never voted straight party ticket until this year but I'd like to point out that it was the GOP who pushed the "straight slate" thing for decades here but now that it can hurt them, it's gone. Funny how that works.

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1 hour ago, texas911 said:

So people that are moving to Houston come from cities that have rail. What do they all have in common, its outrageously expensive to live in those cities! Thanks, but no thanks. You want to live in a city with rail, go move there! Options people, options.

 

Rail isn't some luxury item that cities buy as a present for their residents. It is (or should be) part of a toolbox of urban transportation solutions, to be used on highly trafficked corridors where cars aren't getting the job done.

 

Here's the throughput of a single 10-foot lane based on transportation mode: https://nacto.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Design-to-Move-People_all-e1461361807936.jpg. Because cars require so much space to operate and often only carry one person, they have a very low throughput. Bus and rail lines are extremely effective when the terminus of the line is a compact, highly popular destination. That's why our Park and Ride system is so much more efficient than driving for commuters heading downtown. It's able to transport many times the number of people without becoming congested on highly-trafficked corridors (the freeways) to a compact, walkable destination (the CBD). The low throughput of our freeway system exhibits itself every day during rush hour(s), when roadways which only have the capacity to move a few thousand people in an hour without congestion are suddenly packed with tens of thousands.

 

There is no evidence that building rail makes cities more expensive. Los Angeles has become expensive despite being the eternal stereotype of a car city. What does make cities expensive is unmet demand, both for housing and transportation. If Houston wants to avoid the costliness and congestion of L.A., we need to keep building as much housing as possible, and we need to keep an open mind to implementing higher-capacity modes of transportation, like BRT and rail, where they have been proven to work elsewhere.

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mkultra25    606
1 hour ago, KinkaidAlum said:

Again, I've never voted straight party ticket until this year but I'd like to point out that it was the GOP who pushed the "straight slate" thing for decades here but now that it can hurt them, it's gone. Funny how that works.

 

Those who were here in the 80s will no doubt associate "Straight Slate" with a very specific meaning that went well beyond simple straight-ticket voting. 

 

straight slate poster.jpg

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