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Hanover Rice Village: Multifamily At 2455 Dunstan Rd.


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That pic Pumapayam uses above gets me every time. Man, that's funny.

The Pre-sales ads typically mean they are trying to get a certain number of contracts (not reservations like 2727, but i digress) so they can move forward with construction. I called number and spoke to sales lady who tells me actual project launch is in March. Lots of buzz on this project though. Hope it goes!

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  • 4 weeks later...

So what. Is this project dead? I thought construction was supposed to in the near future. Has anyone heard any promising news?

Edited by C2H
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So what. Is this project dead? I thought construction was supposed to in the near future. Has anyone heard any promising news?

Randall Davis has such a succesful track record that he has a hoard of investors following him anywhere he goes - of course when I say succesful I'm talking about the investor point of view, and NOT the architectural point of view!!!

That rendering from the ZCA postcard shown above is over two years old. In the meantime, he must have done his due dilligence, refined his market study, talked to his investors and his lenders, redesigned the building to look like the newer rendering (based on the market response) and finally launched his website and presales effort, which is probably a requiremnt from the lenders.

As ugly as most of his buildings are (yes, that is my opinion) at least he knows what he's doing. I would say that if he's gotten this far in the course of two years it means the project is definetly not dead.

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From the article:

"I just hope that it doesn't attract people who are going to stay up all night driving down our streets keeping everybody awake," [Joe Hightower, vice president of the Southampton Place Extension Property Owner's Association] says.

So let's get this logic right.

The Village is home to lots of bars & restaurants.

The developer puts up a sign hoping to appeal to customers who might like to live near said bars & restaurants.

...And the civic club guy is worried that the sign is going to attract the wrong kind of people to his neighborhood?

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it's just a corny advertisement

Bill Fogarty of local ad agency Fogarty Klein Monroe sees the sign as an effort to define Sonoma's market.

"That sign tells me that the project is being built to appeal to people who follow a certain lifestyle because bohemians and hippies follow similar lifestyles, and I guess adding attorneys implies that they recognize that attorneys have the income to live there," Fogarty says.

:rolleyes:

i think this one is the one to be worried about, though:

We didn't create West U living, we're just perfecting it

Edited by sevfiv
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The Rice Village Arcade is NOT in West U. It is in the City of Houston!

As for the parking, do you really think parking will continue to be a breeze as Houston continues to grow? It's about the easiest big city in the country to drive in but it wont be for much longer as we add an estimated 3 million more people to the metro in the next 25 years. Of course, I also don't think it's such a bad thing for parking to become harder. People will just have to make choices on where to live and shop and developers will have to start building things beyond the faux Spanish strip mall and big box developments!

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As for the parking, do you really think parking will continue to be a breeze as Houston continues to grow? It's about the easiest big city in the country to drive in but it wont be for much longer as we add an estimated 3 million more people to the metro in the next 25 years. Of course, I also don't think it's such a bad thing for parking to become harder. People will just have to make choices on where to live and shop and developers will have to start building things beyond the faux Spanish strip mall and big box developments!

i agree that parking will become more critical and choices will have to be made by consumers. I know i usually stay clear of the village for that reason except for a couple of restaurants i frequent with their own parking. parking will be around as long as the car is.

we were at the dietrich's on montrose a few weeks ago and people were complaining about the parking situation there.

Edited by musicman
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aren't the children of the sixties now attorneys, ad execs, investment bankers and so on? i think the advertisement is meant to provoke feelings of nostalgia to those who once were bohemian or hippie, and who can now afford a high standard of living. the responses by the civic associations were missing the point.

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aren't the children of the sixties now attorneys, ad execs, investment bankers and so on? i think the advertisement is meant to provoke feelings of nostalgia to those who once were bohemian or hippie, and who can now afford a high standard of living. the responses by the civic associations were missing the point.

Ditto. Bohemians and hippies can't afford this place.

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  • 1 month later...

I really cannot get excited about this project. Traffic and parking are already ridiculous in the Village. Also, as in many of Randall Davis's other developments, the architecture is cheesy to the point of being downright ugly. The development will definitely put another nail in the coffin of the Village's unique character, but it will probably be financially successful - the sole virtue to which all Houston commercial buildings aspire. <_<

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I really cannot get excited about this project. Traffic and parking are already ridiculous in the Village. Also, as in many of Randall Davis's other developments, the architecture is cheesy to the point of being downright ugly. The development will definitely put another nail in the coffin of the Village's unique character, but it will probably be financially successful - the sole virtue to which all Houston commercial buildings aspire. <_<

I completely agree. This will turn into another ugly, banal enclave for those who wish to spend big bucks on poor quality. Again, don't 'cha just love Houston developers. "Please, give us your first born for mediocrity. For mediocrity's sake...."

Edited by Subdude
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I really cannot get excited about this project. Traffic and parking are already ridiculous in the Village. Also, as in many of Randall Davis's other developments, the architecture is cheesy to the point of being downright ugly. The development will definitely put another nail in the coffin of the Village's unique character, but it will probably be financially successful - the sole virtue to which all Houston commercial buildings aspire. <_<

My only real concern is the traffic flow in the area, the parking will be resolved after the construction is complete, it will be interesting to see what traffic solutions are going to be implemented in the area.

I'm not really for or against the project specifically, but I do think that it will bring some a positive change in Rice that will probably occur to the rest of the village over the next couple of decades.

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I completely agree. This will turn into another ugly, banal enclave for those who wish to spend big bucks on poor quality. Again, don't 'cha just love Houston developers. "Please, give us your first born for mediocrity. For mediocrity's sake...."

This overgeneralization isn't fair at all. Houston-based developers have and continue to build top-notch projects here and elsewhere. Finger and Hanover are 2 of the top multifamily developers around, building interesting luxurious apartments. Borlenghi has done some nice stuff, as have many others. and lest we forget Hines. Sure, Houston developers also build some crap, but the quality of product produced by many Houston developers stacks up with anybody out there.

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name three NICE projects they've developed.

Exactly my point. Aside from a few Po Mo examples in the 70s and 80s there has been a dearth of buildings with real architectural significance built in Houston in the last couple of decades (one recent example might be the University of Texas Nursing School completed in 2004). Compared to cities like Chicago, New York and L.A. we haven't seen substantive examples of 'real' architecture in quite some time. I'm talking cutting edge buildings that will stand the test of time and actually make a statement. And you know what? Developers in Houston will probably not develop anything in our current mini boom that bucks the trend. That probability is frustratingly difficult to embrace.

I hope that the MFA will decide to build something with real merit when they expand in the next few years. The Moneo-designed Beck building was somewhat of a disappointment considering his other designs. How about some Calatrava or Herzog & de Meuron? By the way, is Asia House (Taniguchi) going to happen? It's been pretty quite on that front for some time.

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Exactly my point. Aside from a few Po Mo examples in the 70s and 80s there has been a dearth of buildings with real architectural significance built in Houston in the last couple of decades (one recent example might be the University of Texas Nursing School completed in 2004). Compared to cities like Chicago, New York and L.A. we haven't seen substantive examples of 'real' architecture in quite some time. I'm talking cutting edge buildings that will stand the test of time and actually make a statement. And you know what? Developers in Houston will probably not develop anything in our current mini boom that bucks the trend. That probability is frustratingly difficult to embrace.

I hope that the MFA will decide to build something with real merit when they expand in the next few years. The Moneo-designed Beck building was somewhat of a disappointment considering his other designs. How about some Calatrava or Herzog & de Meuron? By the way, is Asia House (Taniguchi) going to happen? It's been pretty quite on that front for some time.

Agreed 100%. I've been crabbing about the same thing for a long time (usually in the context of the Hobby Center, new downtown cathedral or the Beck Building at MFAH). Houston has been content to throw away its architectural reputation. W.r.t. the next MFAH expansion I don't care as much about getting a "starchitect" as much as their focusing on getting a great design. I think with the Beck they went the famous name route and thought that was enough, instead of pushing him to come up with something more interesting than the box with blank walls.

My understanding is that Asia House is a go but they are still working on getting funding.

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As Houston is such an dismal place for architecture, I'm very surprised HAIF was ever created in the first place. Maybe I'm completely missing the point of this website, this isn't an architecture forum at all - it's more like a complaint desk to nowhere.

Not only is the architecture in Houston a complete waste of building materials, but there isn't even any hope for any good architecture in the future. As architecture enthusiast, how can you guys sleep at night? It must be unending torture living in Houston. That must be why this site is run from Chicago.

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As Houston is such an dismal place for architecture, I'm very surprised HAIF was ever created in the first place. Maybe I'm completely missing the point of this website, this isn't an architecture forum at all - it's more like a complaint desk to nowhere.

Not only is the architecture in Houston a complete waste of building materials, but there isn't even any hope for any good architecture in the future. As architecture enthusiast, how can you guys sleep at night? It must be unending torture living in Houston. That must be why this site is run from Chicago.

:lol::lol: :lol:

Well said. I wonder about some of the people on here at times as well.

Edited by ricco67
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name three NICE projects they've developed.

I don't buy the idea that you need cutting edge architecture to have a quality project. Heck, I don't want to see a Guggenheim on every street corner. There have been numerous quality projects built in Houston in the last several years- Museum Tower, Sabine Lofts, Esplanade at Museum Circle (or whatever its called), Five Houston Center, Villa d'Este, Market Street in Woodlands, Anadarko Tower, Jackson Hill Apartments, etc.. All are quality representations of what the developers sought to achieve, not just ugly crap quickly thrown together. These are real buildings done well.

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As Houston is such an dismal place for architecture, I'm very surprised HAIF was ever created in the first place. Maybe I'm completely missing the point of this website, this isn't an architecture forum at all - it's more like a complaint desk to nowhere.

Not only is the architecture in Houston a complete waste of building materials, but there isn't even any hope for any good architecture in the future. As architecture enthusiast, how can you guys sleep at night? It must be unending torture living in Houston. That must be why this site is run from Chicago.

My favorite piece of architecture in Chicago is Wrigley. I've been told the've expanded the number of restrooms in the place, provided it has been the busiest place in the building for the last 99 years. Too bad the architecture hasn't translated to the on field performance of the team. Cabrito anyone?

There's bad architecture everywhere. Chicago is no exception....wannabee NYC.

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My favorite piece of architecture in Chicago is Wrigley. I've been told the've expanded the number of restrooms in the place, provided it has been the busiest place in the building for the last 99 years. Too bad the architecture hasn't translated to the on field performance of the team. Cabrito anyone?

There's bad architecture everywhere. Chicago is no exception....wannabee NYC.

I agree, and it's been discussed in a thread around here somewhere, is that modern building architecture is rarely appreciated in the immediate time after it's built and that it would only take several decades before someone is able to fully take in the beauty of a building with lines that are not in vogue for that particular time it was built.

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Not only is the architecture in Houston a complete waste of building materials, but there isn't even any hope for any good architecture in the future.

I agree, look at the real estate forum for proof. Some guy is asking for help finding an "architect" to do a Mediterranean house, and he got lots of replies.

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I don't buy the idea that you need cutting edge architecture to have a quality project. Heck, I don't want to see a Guggenheim on every street corner. There have been numerous quality projects built in Houston in the last several years- Museum Tower, Sabine Lofts, Esplanade at Museum Circle (or whatever its called), Five Houston Center, Villa d'Este, Market Street in Woodlands, Anadarko Tower, Jackson Hill Apartments, etc.. All are quality representations of what the developers sought to achieve, not just ugly crap quickly thrown together. These are real buildings done well.

hey everybody let's all rush down to the jackson hill apartments!! now be honest, that statement has NEVER BEEN SAID!

Edited by musicman
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Houston is so hopeless that everybody should just put a bullet through their head and be done with it all. Maybe we will be reincarnated as New Yorkers and then we won't have any problems. :D

I agree with Subdude, the negativity make this place interesting. But luckily for me, I'm one of the many who likes most of the high profile buildings in Houston so I get to live in ignorant bliss, while the sophistocates are forced to wallow in the bowels of architecture hell. :P

On the upside, I hear there are escape routes out of this void for those who can't handle it.

Edited by Mister X
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I agree with Subdude, the negativity make this place interesting.

I prefer the term "constructive criticism".

On the upside, I hear there are escape routes out of this void for those who can't handle it.

On the upside, there are those who believe Houston can be molded (albeit kicking and screaming) into a first-class city.

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And on the upper side - there are people who already like the architecture in Houston and don't have to do anything but sit back, enjoy it, and watch the silly, frustrated, and angry people knock their heads together to make Houston first class in the eyes of New York and Chicago. :rolleyes:

But seriously, I'm glad people want to make Houston first class or better, I just don't have a lot of faith that typing negitive comments all day on the internet is going to make Houston a first class city. Houston has plenty of problems, I just don't think that the architecture is a big one. In fact, I think the architecture and the people are Houston's strongest assets.

Now if we start talking freeway blight, open ditches, inadequate light rail, humidity, mosquitos, brown water, flooding, crime, lack of theme parks, lack of major league hockey, pollution, rap music, suburban sprawl, and big butts - I say type away - and use all capital letters for Christ's sake! Of course, I wouldn't expect the water to get any clearer, but at least I could understand the negitivity. (It's all about opinion here anyway - some people probably like rap music and mosquitos)

If you guys can get us some world class architecture by whining on HAIF - more power to you. If it works, I'll be your cheerleader :) - or should I say jeerleader. :ph34r:

Edited by Mister X
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This will turn into another ugly, banal enclave for those who wish to spend big bucks on poor quality.

Constructive criticism?

Sounds like negativity to me. But like Sub said, it keeps HAIF interesting. It's been a while since I've seen Rice Village, but the renderings look better than the way I remember it being.

Edited by Mister X
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And on the upper side - there are people who already like the architecture in Houston and don't have to do anything but sit back, enjoy it, and watch the silly, frustrated, and angry people knock their heads together to make Houston first class in the eyes of New York and Chicago. :rolleyes:

Enjoying (some of) our current architecture does not change the fact that new buildings are going up, both in Houston and the rest of the world. When it becomes apparent that what is being built in Houston is not as bold and distinctive as what was being built 25 or 30 years ago, people are inclined to comment.

To "sit back (and) enjoy it" is known as resting on one's laurels. It would be "silly" to give up on Houston now.

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I thought commenting on HAIF - WAS resting on one's laurels. Maybe you're right about not sitting back and enjoying life. Worrying over something that doesn't bother me and that I have no control over makes makes much more sense.

But seriously, I absolutely agree. It would be beyond silly to give up on Houston now or ever.

If the architecture in Houston really bothers you, by all means voice your opinion. But it's no crime to be content with what's going up either if one is inclined to do so. You guys can type yourselves silly and maybe Houston will be home to the next penis tower, oh wait that's on another thread.

I'm kidding, I really hope Houston gets something spectacular and if that happens because the involved architects or builders get a sense of the angst of a few HAIFers, then I'll be greatful for all the noise.

Give 'um hell! Far be it for me to be the one to discourage some brand new, world class architecture for Houston. Keep those complaint letters to architecture Santa Claus coming (by way of HAIF) and maybe Houston will get a spire in it's stocking for Christmas.

Everyone is entitled to their comments, positive, negitive, constructive or just plain b*ching - it's just that listening to a bunch of complainers get's old fast. So I feel a need to brighten your day - you're welcomed. :)

Edited by Mister X
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hey everybody let's all rush down to the jackson hill apartments!! now be honest, that statement has NEVER BEEN SAID!

If your condescension makes you feel better, good for you. But those apartments are 93% occupied with rents over $1,500 a door, one of the highest rates in the city. Perhaps they are not architecturally significant, but they are quite pleasant. Since when is designing a nice apartment complex that people want to live in a crime?

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If your condescension makes you feel better, good for you. But those apartments are 93% occupied with rents over $1,500 a door, one of the highest rates in the city. Perhaps they are not architecturally significant, but they are quite pleasant. Since when is designing a nice apartment complex that people want to live in a crime?

no condescension at all. basically everything that is being built is being occupied fairly quickly. because someone charges high rents doesn't mean a quality structure has been built. go take a look at some of those in midtown. i know a friend lived in the amli over there but moved out due to water leaking in around the windows. that's one of those apartment complexes that looks "quite pleasant"

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And on the upper side - there are people who already like the architecture in Houston and don't have to do anything but sit back, enjoy it, and watch the silly, frustrated, and angry people knock their heads together to make Houston first class in the eyes of New York and Chicago. :rolleyes:

But seriously, I'm glad people want to make Houston first class or better, I just don't have a lot of faith that typing negitive comments all day on the internet is going to make Houston a first class city. Houston has plenty of problems, I just don't think that the architecture is a big one. In fact, I think the architecture and the people are Houston's strongest assets.

Now if we start talking freeway blight, open ditches, inadequate light rail, humidity, mosquitos, brown water, flooding, crime, lack of theme parks, lack of major league hockey, pollution, rap music, suburban sprawl, and big butts - I say type away - and use all capital letters for Christ's sake! Of course, I wouldn't expect the water to get any clearer, but at least I could understand the negitivity. (It's all about opinion here anyway - some people probably like rap music and mosquitos)

If you guys can get us some world class architecture by whining on HAIF - more power to you. If it works, I'll be your cheerleader :) - or should I say jeerleader. :ph34r:

Any change has to begin somewhere. Every revolution in history began with a few people complaining about how dissatisfied they were with things. Do I expect a discussion on HAIF to directly influence how an architect designs a building or whether a developer goes through with a project? Of course not. But as the saying goes, a butterfly flaps its wings in Tokyo and it changes the weather in New York....

People come by chance to this site, read something, and get interested. They keep reading more, learning about the city and its architectural heritage. Then they go to the Brazos Bookstore and buy books about the city's architecture, and when the books sell out, publishers become more willing to publish books on Houston architecture. Eventually you have twice as many titles in the "Local Interest" section related to architecture. The academic community starts to take notice. It becomes easier for Rice or UH to lure a professor of architecture if he doesn't feel he'd be coming to a backwater. A great emerging architect based locally will be more hesitant to move his practice elsewhere if Houston possesses a strong, homegrown architectural "scene." Sort of like New Orleans has in the culinary world, or Nashville in the music world.

And besides all that, people who love something like architecture just love talking about it. Discussion is an end in itself. And when we are angry or disappointed about a building, instead of keeping our thoughts to ourselves we can complain to a group of people who will listen to our complaints and agree, or perhaps disagree, and have a (hopefully) thoughtful and stimulating discussion about why they disagree. We end up learning more, and developing our ideas further than if we kept them to ourselves.

Edited by H-Town Man
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no condescension at all. basically everything that is being built is being occupied fairly quickly. because someone charges high rents doesn't mean a quality structure has been built. go take a look at some of those in midtown. i know a friend lived in the amli over there but moved out due to water leaking in around the windows. that's one of those apartment complexes that looks "quite pleasant"

Did he ask management to fix it? If so, did they respond?

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I lived in the Jackson Hill Apartments and I have to say it was a very nice experience for my wife and I. The walls are a bit thin, but most apartments don't have the most sound proof walls. However, the community and the surrounding area made it fantastic. We would step out and take the pedestrian bridge across to the bayou and go walking in the evenings. If I had to rent again, I would definitely consider it.

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Any change has to begin somewhere. Every revolution in history began with a few people complaining about how dissatisfied they were with things. Do I expect a discussion on HAIF to directly influence how an architect designs a building or whether a developer goes through with a project? Of course not. But as the saying goes, a butterfly flaps its wings in Tokyo and it changes the weather in New York....

People come by chance to this site, read something, and get interested. They keep reading more, learning about the city and its architectural heritage. Then they go to the Brazos Bookstore and buy books about the city's architecture, and when the books sell out, publishers become more willing to publish books on Houston architecture. Eventually you have twice as many titles in the "Local Interest" section related to architecture. The academic community starts to take notice. It becomes easier for Rice or UH to lure a professor of architecture if he doesn't feel he'd be coming to a backwater. A great emerging architect based locally will be more hesitant to move his practice elsewhere if Houston possesses a strong, homegrown architectural "scene." Sort of like New Orleans has in the culinary world, or Nashville in the music world.

And besides all that, people who love something like architecture just love talking about it. Discussion is an end in itself. And when we are angry or disappointed about a building, instead of keeping our thoughts to ourselves we can complain to a group of people who will listen to our complaints and agree, or perhaps disagree, and have a (hopefully) thoughtful and stimulating discussion about why they disagree. We end up learning more, and developing our ideas further than if we kept them to ourselves.

I mostly agree with all this. No one is right or wrong here, it's all just opinion. But some these posts sound like Houston is a complete architectural waste land with no hope for the future and it isn't. Things aren't all bleek in Houston. If it were I don't believe this website would have ever been created and have as much activity as it does.

Sure there are better places with better architecture, but I bet there are a lot of people who live in other cities that would love to get their hands on some of the architecture that Houston has. After all, who wouldn't KILL for a Williams tower and a TMC in their town. There are a lot of cities that would love to have the economy that Houston has. Houston today is a sucess story and mostly has been since it was founded. Sometimes people don't appreciate the good things that are right in front of them. And that's sad.

Focusing strictly on the negitives won't accomplish anything. And while I would agree that focusing strictly on the positives won't get you anywhere either, at least it's better than moping around all day, angry and frustrated with nothing to do but gripe over things you can't change. Houston isn't some urban utopia, and not everyone's going to like it, but it IS possible to live here and enjoy it too. In fact, with the way people are moving to this area by the thousands every year, there must be something good happening around here.

Edited by Mister X
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I don't think it's terribly important if posters focus on positives or negatives. This is the the site to express your opinion about Houston architecture, so whether that is postive or negative, speak up and have some fun with it. We don't expect people to just sit around and say nice things.

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Sure enough.

I suppose if all I ever heard around here was that everything was so wonderful in Houston, I'd probably feel the need to do a reality check to point out what's wrong with Houston. But I doubt things will ever get too postive or negitive around here with out someone offering an opposing viewpoint.

For the last day I've been the positive ying to the negitive yang.

Edited by Mister X
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For the last day I've been the positive ying to the negitive yang.

Generalizing about people on this forum as ineffectual, silly, negative, unappreciative, sad, angry, frustrated whiners is not positive. It's called trolling.

Please stop it.

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I live close to the Rice Village and am eagerly awaiting more news on this project. HAIF is my primary source for any updates, and it is frustrating to check this message board once a week......only to find endless banter and pontification about anything but the Rice Village.

Please keep it on topic.

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I live close to the Rice Village and am eagerly awaiting more news on this project. HAIF is my primary source for any updates, and it is frustrating to check this message board once a week......only to find endless banter and pontification about anything but the Rice Village.

Please keep it on topic.

You make an excellent point.

You might also want to explore the options for subscribing to this thread. That way you'll be e-mailed when something new is posted and you won't have to remember to check on your own, you'll get reminders.

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  • The title was changed to Hanover Rice Village: Multifamily At 2455 Dunstan Rd.

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